New answers tagged

1

Keg, 8 bytes «H%c¡|,! Just the standard hello world program!¡


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W, 11 bytes Just a compressed source literal. „o⑻'Ė⑨↷⑴Ï⑽Š


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W, 10 bytes Glad that none of the characters appear in the compressed source. ,⬤⑭¿ƒ⓺⑧ėg5


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naz, 80 bytes 9a8m1o9a9a8a3a1o6a1a1o1o3a1o0m9a4m8a1o9s3s1o3m9s1o9a9a6a1o3a1o6s1o8s1o0m4a8m1a1o Breaks rule 2 only.


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naz, 64 bytes 9a8m1o3d4m5a1o7a2o3a1o3d7a1o9s3s1o3m9s1o9a9a6a1o3a1o6s1o8s1o3d1o naz is my new language where every command is given by a number and a letter. Programs operate on a single register whose value can be between -127 and 127, inclusive. This program uses the instructions for add, subtract, multiply, and divide to set the register to the ASCII ...


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tq, 15 bytes "Hello, World!" Pretty much just defines a list with the only item as the string "Hello, World!".


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Underload, 24 bytes (Goodbye Cruel World!)S* Try it Online! (Goodbye Cruel World!)S | Puts "Goodbye Cruel World!" onto the stack, then pops and prints it. * | Tries to concatenate two items of an empty stack.


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Symbolic Raku, 34 bytes $_='(%,,/ @)/),$!'~^'`@@@@ `~@[@@' Try it online! My newest language, though it's not too original. This is inspired by FlipTack's Symbolic Python, which bans the use of alphanumeric characters, but otherwise executes as Python code. In this case, I've used the language Raku (previously known as Perl 6), which takes input ...


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Ruby, 41 bytes / 2 = 20.5 bytes! "Goodbye Cruel World!"&$><<"Hello World!" Try it online! $><< is a very useful method of output for Ruby golfing--syntax around it is very forgiving("Goodbye Cruel World!"&puts"Hello World!" would be a syntax error, for example, rather than the runtime exception we need), and << has medium ...


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Spice, 20 bytes @OUT "Hello, World!" Explanation Should be pretty straight forward what's happening, but we use some undefined behaviour to shave off 2 bytes (interpreter version 1.1.0.0, which is current at time of submission). The program should read: ;@ OUT "Hello, World!"; as per the spec, but we drop the ; as we only have one instruction and don't ...


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Ral, 103 bytes What better way to introduce a new language than by posting the 768th "Hello, World!"? Hand-made code, can probably be improved a lot. 11+:+:+:0=1+:+:+::+:.+0*/-::1+.0*+:::..1+1+1+::.0*:+:+:11+1+:+:++..10*1+1+1+:+:+:+-..1+1+1+...0*:+:+1+. Try it online!


2

Wren, 37 bytes -System.print("Goodbye Cruel World!") Try it online! Explanation "Goodbye Cruel World!" // Define the string "Goodbye Cruel World!" System.print( ) // Output the string to STDOUT - // Apply negation upon the returned string // ...


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W d, 17 bytes Weirdly enough, I got the same bytecount when I avoided the bonus! ¿M•}®0(`3‡Ƕ∑⑴⅀⅍ø≤ Unpacked: CD(IdK815Ak]T&:Q>`P/ After string-decompression: Goodbye Cruel World!"P/ Explanation "Goodbye Cruel World!" % Define the string "Goodbye Cruel World!" P % Output the string to STDOUT with a newline ...


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W, 34 33/2 = 16.5 bytes s|x@`p"Goodbye Cruel"" World!"P+/ Explanation "Hello"p % Print "Hello" to STDOUT without a newline " World!"P % Output " World" to STDOUT with a newline "Goodbye Cruel" + % Join "Goodbye Cruel" with the string / % Perform ...


1

Intcode, 83 72 70 bytes 204,8,109,1,1205,8,0,99,72,101,108,108,111,44,32,87,111,114,108,100,33 Try it online! Old 83 byte version: 1106,0,17,72,101,108,108,111,44,32,87,111,114,108,100,33,0,204,3,109,1,1205,3,17,99


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