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Results tagged with Search options user 56819

A competition to solve a particular problem through the usage and manipulation of strings.

1
vote
string to process: \x02abcde. Try it online! In this TIO, a newline character is the index, which means an index of 0x0a = 10. Test cases! These use hex input + printf to make it clearer what's … flipped with an xor gate ({), which is almost negation. Then, for each character of the string, this value is incremented via some half-adders (@). When this value is incremented from 0xff to 0x00, it …
answered May 19 '17 by Phlarx
3
votes
Chip, 2 bytes *f Try it online! Chip reads in a byte, does whatever calculations are in the code, and writes a byte. So, for each byte of input, we ignore the input and write 0x20 instead. The emp …
answered May 26 '17 by Phlarx
1
vote
detecting 'hello' and terminating once it is found. The algorithm I use is to locate differences between the string 'hello' and the five most recent bytes. If no differences are found, then we have …
answered Apr 17 '17 by Phlarx
0
votes
string to process: \x02abcde. Try it online! In this TIO, a newline character is the index, which means an index of 0x0a = 10. Test cases! These use hex input + printf to make it clearer what's … (\). The index bits have been flipped with an xor gate ({), which is almost negation. Then, for each character of the string, this value is incremented via some half-adders (@). When this value is …
answered May 19 '17 by Phlarx
0
votes
Chip, 59 bytes ))))))))-v~. ABCDEFGHS<8< 01234567 >9s ))))))))~\t abcdefgh Try it online! Requires either a null terminator, or the -z flag (which handles that for you). Since I use the flag only …
answered Aug 14 '17 by Phlarx
0
votes
Chip, 19+3 = 22 bytes +3 for flag -z, which adds an infinite stream of 0x00 bytes to the end of the input. cCGgbbBAa fF^~^dDEe Try it online! The behavior, in pseudocode: out_byte := in_byte if …
answered Jun 5 '17 by Phlarx
1
vote
Chip, 5 bytes g*A~a Try it online! Maps all characters to either @ or A, so that the lowest bit always differs from the input: 0, @, ~, etc. map to A 1, a, A, etc. map to @
answered May 31 '17 by Phlarx
0
votes
Chip, 6 bytes A~ae*f Try it online! A Take bit 0x01 of input ~ Invert it a Set bit 0x01 of output to that value * Provide a constant 1 value to neighbors e f Set bits 0 …
answered Jul 5 '17 by Phlarx
0
votes
| )\')\')\')\')\')\')\')\' `--^--^--^--^--^--^--' Try it online! Takes input as a 4-character string. The first two are the characters a and b, followed by the byte value m, and then the byte value n. For example, the TIO includes input ab …
answered Jul 17 '17 by Phlarx
1
vote
Chip, 16 bytes AabBCcdDEefFGghH Try it online! How it works: Each capital letter corresponds to one bit of the input, and each lowercase letter to a bit of the output. An input element, B will …
answered Jan 31 '17 by Phlarx
1
vote
Chip -z, 41 bytes S >vvvvvv~t ABCDEFG |Zz||Zz zbcZzfg a de Try it online! Assumes that either the byte string does not contain zero (\0), or that it designates the end of the string. Alternate solution (45 bytes): azABZbczCDZdezEFZfgzG S-^^----^^----^^----^~t Try it online! …
answered Mar 18 by Phlarx
0
votes
Chip, 62 59 bytes h* Z~. z.g+b >xv< ||sf Zx^< Z< | A/a/D B/b C/c E/d F/e G/f Try it online! I suspect I can golf it more, just gotta figure out how... Chip reads in each byte of input as a colle …
answered Apr 21 '17 by Phlarx
1
vote
Chip, 60 bytes )//Z )/\Z )\/^. )\x/Z )\\\+t |???`~S |z* `{'AabBCcdDEefFGghH Try it online! The three ?'s each produce a random bit. On the first cycle, these bits are run through the switches abov …
answered Jul 17 '17 by Phlarx
5
votes
TIS, 670 666 bytes -4 bytes for jumping forward to jump back Code: @0 MOV UP RIGHT @1 MOV ANY ACC SUB 41 NOP NOP NOP NOP NOP NOP NOP NOP MOV ACC DOWN @2 NOP MOV 124 LEFT @3 MOV ANY DOWN @4 MOV UP A …
answered Apr 3 '18 by Phlarx
5
votes
encodes the target string Hello, World! as a bit matrix, somewhat reminiscent of core memory. The leftmost column of )'s and x's corresponds to H in the output, the rightmost column to !. The ) is an …
answered Feb 1 '17 by Phlarx

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