12
\$\begingroup\$

Given the following Python 3 script:

def greet():
    print("Hello, world!")

greet()

Prepend some lines to this text file so that it can be both executed as a Python program as well as compiled and run as a C++ program producing the same output Hello, world! (including the newline at the end):

$ python3 bilingual.py.cpp
Hello, world!
$ g++ bilingual.py.cpp && ./a.out
Hello, world!

The solution will be scored by the count of non-whitespace characters of the entire program, including the Python script:

sed 's/\s//g' bilingual.py.cpp|wc -c
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5
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ In the title you say add comments, however in the body you say you only have to prepend some lines. Which is it? \$\endgroup\$ – Wheat Wizard Nov 5 '16 at 17:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ @WheatWizard The title is a hint. If you can solve this by prepending arbitrary lines (non-comments) I will be puzzled. \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Nov 5 '16 at 17:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is a very nice question. My only remark would be to just stick to the byte count for scoring in the future. It's simpler to check for those on different systems. \$\endgroup\$ – Linus Nov 5 '16 at 21:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Linus I admit that selecting the score in a non standard way was a mistake. Will not repeat it in the future. \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Nov 5 '16 at 21:56
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Just a note: the provided sed command count the newlines, that are whitespace characters \$\endgroup\$ – edc65 Nov 6 '16 at 7:39
11
\$\begingroup\$

Score 116

Prepend:

#include<cstdio>
#define print(A)main(){puts(A);}
#define greet()
#define \

The preprocessor backslash \ pulls the nasty : containing line into an unused macro. Try it here.

Thanks to edc65's answer for the note about implicit int in C++4.
Thanks to PieCot's answer for suggesting <cstdio> over <stdio.h>.
Thanks to Leon for suggest I remove the X in the original #define X\.

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5
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't have sed, if someone could verify my score I'd greatly appreciate it. \$\endgroup\$ – Linus Nov 5 '16 at 20:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Removing all whitespace, my count (by hand) is 110 (but I was wrong... it's 111) \$\endgroup\$ – edc65 Nov 5 '16 at 20:09
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @Linus Why do you need the X in `#define X\`? \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Nov 5 '16 at 21:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Leon good catch! \$\endgroup\$ – Linus Nov 5 '16 at 21:11
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ For anyone wondering what C++4 is: In this case it is short for "The C++ that gcc 4.3.2 accepts". \$\endgroup\$ – nwp Nov 6 '16 at 11:06
11
\$\begingroup\$

Score 119

(Thx @Linus for the byte count)

(1 byte saved thx @Conor O'Brien) (1 byte saved thx @PieCot)

Counting bytes again by hand, I found 113. Maybe it's right this time. No it's not

#include <cstdio>
#define def main(){0?
#define print(x) puts(x);}
#define greet()

Notes: stdio and puts are still alive and kicking in C++. The missing int type is valid in C++ 4. Test

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8
  • \$\begingroup\$ The score must be computed against the full program (including the python code). \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Nov 5 '16 at 18:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Since the ternary conditional can have an empty second portion, you can remove the trailing 0 on line 2. Test. \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien Nov 5 '16 at 18:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ OK I don't see why, as the python code will be the same for every answer, but you are the boss. I did the count by hand, not having sed, I hope it's right \$\endgroup\$ – edc65 Nov 5 '16 at 18:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ConorO'Brien it really can! I did not know! Thx \$\endgroup\$ – edc65 Nov 5 '16 at 18:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can use <cstdio> rather than <stdio.h> \$\endgroup\$ – PieCot Nov 5 '16 at 19:54
7
\$\begingroup\$

Score 131 130 134

The lines to be prepended are:

#import <iostream>
#define def int main(){0?
#define greet()
#define print(A) 0;std::cout<<A"\n";}

And the resulting code:

#import <iostream>
#define def int main(){0?
#define greet()
#define print(A) 0;std::cout<<A"\n";}
def greet():
    print("Hello, world!")

greet()

Testing

C:\Users\Conor O'Brien\Documents\Programming\golf
λ type bilingual.py.cpp

#import <iostream>
#define def int main(){0?
#define greet()
#define print(A) 0;std::cout<<A"\n";}
def greet():
    print("Hello, world!")

greet()
C:\Users\Conor O'Brien\Documents\Programming\golf
λ sed 's/\s//g' bilingual.py.cpp|wc -c
134

C:\Users\Conor O'Brien\Documents\Programming\golf
λ g++ bilingual.py.cpp 2>nul && a
Hello, world!

C:\Users\Conor O'Brien\Documents\Programming\golf
λ python bilingual.py.cpp
Hello, world!

C:\Users\Conor O'Brien\Documents\Programming\golf
λ 
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9
  • \$\begingroup\$ The output of the C++ version is not identical to the python version - it misses a newline. Added that clarification to the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Nov 5 '16 at 18:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Leon This is now fixed. \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien Nov 5 '16 at 18:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ #import is not valid C++ \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Nov 5 '16 at 18:17
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Clever handling of : \$\endgroup\$ – edc65 Nov 5 '16 at 18:19
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @Leon Our site rules say that if it works in one environment, it's a valid submission. \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien Nov 5 '16 at 18:35
5
\$\begingroup\$

Score 110 104

Improving upon Linus' answer:

#include <cstdio>
#define print main(){puts
#define greet() ;}//\
def greet():
    print("Hello, world!")

greet()

Test as C++

Test as Python

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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have get 109... \$\endgroup\$ – Linus Nov 5 '16 at 21:21
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Linus I have a new line at the last line \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Nov 5 '16 at 21:23
5
\$\begingroup\$

Score 136

Only for the records:

#include <cstdio>
#define def class a{public
#define greet()
#define print(a) };int main(){puts(a);}

Another (less efficient) way to handle the colon.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ But cstdio should be noted. \$\endgroup\$ – edc65 Nov 5 '16 at 20:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think the score for this ends up being 136. You don't count the spaces. \$\endgroup\$ – Linus Nov 5 '16 at 21:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Linus: Thanks! I think you are right. If I use this command: tr -d '[:space:] ' < bilingual.py.cpp | wc -c I get 128, while this one: tr -d '[:blank:] ' < bilingual.py.cpp | wc -c provides 136 \$\endgroup\$ – PieCot Nov 5 '16 at 21:52

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