17
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Last time you made a square of text, but now, can you make a cube of text?

The Challenge

Given a string, output the string in the form of a cube.

You can assume the string will always have 2 chars or more, and will only have printable ascii characters.

How to Make a Text Cube

terrible mspaint skills.png

Test Cases

Input:
Test

Output:
   Test
  e  ss
 s  e e
tseT  T
s  e e
e  ss
Test

Input:
Hello, world!

Output:
            Hello, world!
           e           dd
          l           l l
         l           r  r
        o           o   o
       ,           w    w

     w           ,      ,
    o           o       o
   r           l        l
  l           l         l
 d           e          e
!dlrow ,olleH           H
d           e          e
l           l         l
r           l        l
o           o       o
w           ,      ,

,           w    w
o           o   o
l           r  r
l           l l
e           dd
Hello, world!

Input:
Hi

Output:
 Hi
iHH
Hi

Reference Implementation in Python

text = raw_input("Enter a string: ")

print " " * (len(text) - 1) + text

spaces = len(text) - 2
_spaces = spaces

for i in range(1, len(text) - 2 + 1):
    print " " * spaces + text[i] + " " * _spaces + text[(i + 1) * -1] + " " * (_spaces - spaces) + text[(i + 1) * -1]
    spaces -= 1

print text[::-1] + " " * _spaces + text[0]

spaces = _spaces - 1

for i in range(1, len(text) - 2 + 1):
    print text[(i + 1) * -1] + " " * _spaces + text[i] + " " * spaces + text[i]
    spaces -= 1

print text

Rules

  • This is , so shortest answer in bytes wins! Tiebreaker is most upvoted.
  • Standard loopholes are disallowed.
  • Trailing newline and trailing spaces are allowed.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Are trailing spaces allowed? \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Sep 6 '16 at 23:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Neil Yes. (15 chars) \$\endgroup\$ – acrolith Sep 7 '16 at 0:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Just curious, what's with the additional characters in the challenge title? \$\endgroup\$ – AdmBorkBork Sep 7 '16 at 18:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @TimmyD "A cube of text" is 14 characters long, the title needs to be at least 15 characters long, so I added a small dot. I think it's this one. \$\endgroup\$ – acrolith Sep 7 '16 at 18:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ah, OK. It shows up as a much larger circle in IE on my computer, hence my question. \$\endgroup\$ – AdmBorkBork Sep 7 '16 at 18:35
2
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Pyth, 78 bytes

AtBtlQJ_SH
+*dGQVJs[*Nd@Q-GN*dHK@QN*d-HNK;
++_Q*dHhQVJs[@QN*dH@Q-GN*dtN@Q-GN;

With trailing newline. Inspired by Joshua de Haan's Python 3 answer.

Try it online here!

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4
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Python 2, 228 223 221 203 199 195 189

t=input()
x=" "
l=len(t)-1
q=l-1
f=range(q,0,-1)
print x*l+t
for i in f:print x*i+t[l-i]+x*q+t[i]+x*(q-i)+t[i]
print t[::-1]+x*q+t[0]
for i in f:print t[i]+x*q+t[l-i]+x*(i-1)+t[l-i]
print t

Python 3, 192 188 182

t=input()
x=" "
l=len(t)-1
q=l-1
p=print
f=range(q,0,-1)
p(x*l+t)
for i in f:p(x*i+t[l-i]+x*q+t[i]+x*(q-i)+t[i])
p(t[::-1]+x*q+t[0])
for i in f:p(t[i]+x*q+t[l-i]+x*(i-1)+t[l-i])
p(t)
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  • \$\begingroup\$ That's 203 bytes. Also, you can save 4 bytes by replacing raw_input() with input(). \$\endgroup\$ – acrolith Sep 6 '16 at 23:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Right you are, thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – Joshua de Haan Sep 6 '16 at 23:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ x*(q)? You should be able to remove the parens, yes? \$\endgroup\$ – Value Ink Sep 7 '16 at 0:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ You're right, silly me ;) Fixing it now haha \$\endgroup\$ – Joshua de Haan Sep 7 '16 at 0:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ x*(i-1) -> x*~-i \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Sep 7 '16 at 20:26
3
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x86 (IA-32) machine code, 126 bytes

Hexdump:

60 8b f9 57 33 c0 f2 ae 5e 2b fe 4f 87 fa 8d 1c
12 8b c3 48 f6 e3 c6 04 07 00 48 c6 04 07 20 75
f9 8b ea 4d 53 8d 04 2a 50 53 8b c5 f6 e3 8d 44
68 01 50 53 2b c2 8b c8 50 4b 53 55 53 03 c5 50
f7 d3 53 50 53 95 f6 e2 6b c0 04 50 43 53 51 6a
01 4a 52 6a 01 50 6a ff 51 b0 0a 6a 0b 8b dc 59
8b 6c cb fc 88 04 2f 03 2c cb 89 6c cb fc 83 f9
0a 75 01 ac e2 ea 4a 79 e0 83 c4 58 61 c3

This is a bit long, so to explain it I'll give C code first:

void doit(const char* s, char out[])
{
    int n = strlen(s);
    int w = 2 * n;
    int h = w - 1;
    int m = n - 1;

    memset(out, ' ', h * w);
    out[h * w] = 0;

    int offset1 = n + m;
    int offset2 = w * m + 2 * m + 1; // 2 * n * n - 1
    int offset3 = offset2 - n; // 2 * n * n - n - 1
    int offset4 = 4 * n * m; // 4 * n * n - 4 * n

    int offsets[] = {
        offset3, -1,
        offset4, 1,
        m, 1,
        offset3, 1 - w,
        offset4, -w,
        offset2 - 1, -w,
        offset2 - 1, w - 1,
        m, w - 1,
        offset3, w,
        offset2, w,
        offset1, w,
    };

    do
    {
        char c = *s++;
        for (int i = 0; i < 11; ++i)
        {
            if (i == 9)
                c = '\n';
            int offset = offsets[i * 2];
            assert(offset > 0 && offset < w * h);
            out[offset] = c;
            offsets[i * 2] += offsets[i * 2 + 1];
        }
    } while (--n);
}

Here n is the length of the input string.

The dimensions of the output area are 2n (width) by 2n-1 (height). First, it fills everything with spaces (and adds a terminating null byte). Then, it travels along 11 straight lines in the output area, and fills them with text:

  • 2 lines are filled with end-of-line bytes (=10)
  • 9 lines are filled with the consecutive bytes of the input string

Each line is represented by two numbers, a start offset and a stride. I stuffed them both into the array offsets, to make access "easy".

The interesting part is filling the array. There is little importance for the order of the entries in the array; I tried to rearrange them to minimize the number of register conflicts. In addition, quadratic formulas have some freedom in choosing the way of calculation; I tried to minimize the number of subtractions (because additions can be implemented by the flexible LEA instruction).

Assembly source:

    pushad;

    ; // Calculate the length of the input string
    mov edi, ecx;
    push edi;
    xor eax, eax;
    repne scasb;
    pop esi; // esi = input string
    sub edi, esi;
    dec edi;

    ; // Calculate the size of the output area
    xchg edi, edx;  // edx = n
                    // edi = output string
    lea ebx, [edx + edx]; // ebx = w
    mov eax, ebx;
    dec eax; // eax = h
    mul bl; // eax = w * h

    ; // Fill the output string with spaces and zero terminate it
    mov byte ptr [edi + eax], 0;
myfill:
    dec eax;
    mov byte ptr [edi + eax], ' ';
    jnz myfill;

    mov ebp, edx;
    dec ebp; // ebp = m

    ; // Fill the array of offsets
    push ebx; // w
    lea eax, [edx + ebp];
    push eax; // offset1
    push ebx; // w
    mov eax, ebp;
    mul bl;
    lea eax, [eax + 2 * ebp + 1];
    push eax; // offset2
    push ebx; // w
    sub eax, edx;
    mov ecx, eax; // ecx = offset3
    push eax; // offset3
    dec ebx;
    push ebx; // w - 1
    push ebp; // m
    push ebx; // w - 1
    add eax, ebp;
    push eax; // offset2 - 1
    not ebx;
    push ebx; // -w
    push eax; // offset2 - 1
    push ebx; // -w
    xchg eax, ebp; // eax = m
    mul dl;
    imul eax, eax, 4;
    push eax; // offset4
    inc ebx;
    push ebx; // 1 - w
    push ecx; // offset3
    push 1;
    dec edx; // edx = n - 1
    push edx;
    push 1;
    push eax;
    push -1;
    push ecx;

    ; // Use the array of offsets to write stuff to output
myout:
    mov al, '\n';
    push 11;
    mov ebx, esp;
    pop ecx;
myloop:
    mov ebp, [ebx + ecx * 8 - 4];
    mov [edi + ebp], al;
    add ebp, [ebx + ecx * 8];
    mov [ebx + ecx * 8 - 4], ebp;
    cmp ecx, 10;
    jne skip_read;
    lodsb;
skip_read:
    loop myloop;
    dec edx;
    jns myout;

    add esp, 11 * 8;

    popad;
    ret;

I used byte multiplications here, limiting the length of the input string to 127. This avoids clobbering the register edx - the product is calculated in ax instead.

A minor glitch: when filling the array, the length of the string gets decreased by 1. So I adjusted the loop exit condition:

    jns myout

It counts down to -1.

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3
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Ruby, 148 144 bytes

+1 byte from the n flag. Shows newlines instead of semicolons for readability (same functionality).

S=" "
X=S*s=$_.size-2
puts X+S+I=$_,(r=1..s).map{|i|c=I[~i];S*(s-i+1)+I[i]+X+c+S*~-i+c},I.reverse+X+I[0],r.map{|i|c=I[i];I[~i]+X+c+S*(s-i)+c},I

Run like so. Input is a line of STDIN, with no trailing newline, so it likely needs to be piped from file.

ruby -ne 'S=" ";X=S*s=$_.size-2;puts X+S+I=$_,(r=1..s).map{|i|c=I[~i];S*(s-i+1)+I[i]+X+c+S*~-i+c},I.reverse+X+I[0],r.map{|i|c=I[i];I[~i]+X+c+S*(s-i)+c},I'
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1
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Javascript, 225 198 bytes

Saved 27 bytes thanks to @Neil

f=(s,l=s.length-2,d=' ',r='repeat',t=d[r](l))=>[d+t+s,...a=[...Array(l)].map((_,i)=>d[r](l-i)+s[i+1]+t+(p=s[l-i])+d[r](i)+p),[...s].reverse().join``+t+s[0],...a.map(v=>v.trim()).reverse(),s].join`
`
  • [...] instead of .concat
  • [...]+map instead of for loop
  • only one statement by moving variables as function parameters
  • better initialization for l and t

Original answer:

f=s=>{l=s.length,d=' ',r='repeat',a=[],t=d[r](l-2)+s;for(i=1;i++<l-1;)a.push(d[r](l-i)+s[i-1]+d[r](l-2)+(p=s[l-i])+d[r](i-2)+p);console.log(d+[t].concat(a,[...t].reverse().join``+s[0],a.map(v=>v.trim()).reverse(),s).join`
`)}
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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Nice, although golfable: (s,l=s.length-2,d=' ',r='repeat',t=d[r](l))=>[d+t+s,...a=[...Array(l)].map((_,i)=>d[r](l-i)+s[i+1]+t+(p=s[l-i])+d[r](i)+p),[...s].reverse().join``+t+s[0],...a.map(v=>v.trim()).reverse(),s].join`\n` (using \n because you can't put newlines in comments). \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Sep 7 '16 at 0:03
0
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Java 7, 283 bytes

void a(String s){int h=s.length(),n=h*2-1,t=n-h,u=n-1;char[][]c=new char[n][n];for(int i=0;i<h;i++){c[0][t+i]=c[i][t-i]=c[t][t-i]=c[t+i][t]=c[t+i][u-i]=c[t-i][t+i]=c[t-i][u]=c[u][i]=c[u-i][0]=s.charAt(i);}for(int y=0;y<n;y++){System.out.println(new String(c[y]).replace('\0',' '));}}

Try it here!

Ungolfed:

void a(String s) {
    int length=s.length(),
        n=length*2-1,
        mid=n-length,
        doubleMid=n-1;
    char[][]c=new char[n][n];
    for(int i=0;i<length;i++) {
        c[0][mid+i]= 
        c[i][mid-i]=
        c[mid][mid-i]=
        c[mid+i][mid]=
        c[mid+i][doubleMid-i]=
        c[mid-i][mid+i]=
        c[mid-i][doubleMid]=
        c[doubleMid][i]=
        c[doubleMid-i][0]=s.charAt(i);
    }
    for(int y=0;y<n;y++){
        System.out.println(new String(c[y]).replace('\0',' '));
    }
}
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