35
\$\begingroup\$

Write a program or function that finds the number of zeroes at the end of n! in base 10, where n is an input number (in any desired format).

It can be assumed that n is a positive integer, meaning that n! is also an integer. There are no zeroes after a decimal point in n!. Also, it can be assumed that your programming language can handle the value of n and n!.


Test cases

1
==> 0

5
==> 1

100
==> 24

666
==> 165

2016
==> 502

1234567891011121314151617181920
==> 308641972752780328537904295461

This is code golf. Standard rules apply. The shortest code in bytes wins.

Submissions

To make sure that your answer shows up, please start your answer with a headline, using the following Markdown template:

# Language Name, N bytes

where N is the size of your submission. If you improve your score, you can keep old scores in the headline, by striking them through. For instance:

# Ruby, <s>104</s> <s>101</s> 96 bytes

If there you want to include multiple numbers in your header (e.g. because your score is the sum of two files or you want to list interpreter flag penalties separately), make sure that the actual score is the last number in the header:

# Perl, 43 + 2 (-p flag) = 45 bytes

You can also make the language name a link which will then show up in the leaderboard snippet:

# [><>](http://esolangs.org/wiki/Fish), 121 bytes

Leaderboard

Here is a Stack Snippet to generate both a regular leaderboard and an overview of winners by language.

/* Configuration */

var QUESTION_ID = 79762; // Obtain this from the url
// It will be like https://XYZ.stackexchange.com/questions/QUESTION_ID/... on any question page
var ANSWER_FILTER = "!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe";
var COMMENT_FILTER = "!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk";
var OVERRIDE_USER = 43444; // This should be the user ID of the challenge author.

/* App */

var answers = [], answers_hash, answer_ids, answer_page = 1, more_answers = true, comment_page;

function answersUrl(index) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/" +  QUESTION_ID + "/answers?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + ANSWER_FILTER;
}

function commentUrl(index, answers) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/" + answers.join(';') + "/comments?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + COMMENT_FILTER;
}

function getAnswers() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: answersUrl(answer_page++),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      answers.push.apply(answers, data.items);
      answers_hash = [];
      answer_ids = [];
      data.items.forEach(function(a) {
        a.comments = [];
        var id = +a.share_link.match(/\d+/);
        answer_ids.push(id);
        answers_hash[id] = a;
      });
      if (!data.has_more) more_answers = false;
      comment_page = 1;
      getComments();
    }
  });
}

function getComments() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: commentUrl(comment_page++, answer_ids),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      data.items.forEach(function(c) {
        if (c.owner.user_id === OVERRIDE_USER)
          answers_hash[c.post_id].comments.push(c);
      });
      if (data.has_more) getComments();
      else if (more_answers) getAnswers();
      else process();
    }
  });  
}

getAnswers();

var SCORE_REG = /<h\d>\s*([^\n,]*[^\s,]),.*?(\d+)(?=[^\n\d<>]*(?:<(?:s>[^\n<>]*<\/s>|[^\n<>]+>)[^\n\d<>]*)*<\/h\d>)/;

var OVERRIDE_REG = /^Override\s*header:\s*/i;

function getAuthorName(a) {
  return a.owner.display_name;
}

function process() {
  var valid = [];
  
  answers.forEach(function(a) {
    var body = a.body;
    a.comments.forEach(function(c) {
      if(OVERRIDE_REG.test(c.body))
        body = '<h1>' + c.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG, '') + '</h1>';
    });
    
    var match = body.match(SCORE_REG);
    if (match)
      valid.push({
        user: getAuthorName(a),
        size: +match[2],
        language: match[1],
        link: a.share_link,
      });
    
  });
  
  valid.sort(function (a, b) {
    var aB = a.size,
        bB = b.size;
    return aB - bB
  });

  var languages = {};
  var place = 1;
  var lastSize = null;
  var lastPlace = 1;
  valid.forEach(function (a) {
    if (a.size != lastSize)
      lastPlace = place;
    lastSize = a.size;
    ++place;
    
    var answer = jQuery("#answer-template").html();
    answer = answer.replace("{{PLACE}}", lastPlace + ".")
                   .replace("{{NAME}}", a.user)
                   .replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", a.language)
                   .replace("{{SIZE}}", a.size)
                   .replace("{{LINK}}", a.link);
    answer = jQuery(answer);
    jQuery("#answers").append(answer);

    var lang = a.language;
    if (/<a/.test(lang)) lang = jQuery(lang).text();
    
    languages[lang] = languages[lang] || {lang: a.language, user: a.user, size: a.size, link: a.link};
  });

  var langs = [];
  for (var lang in languages)
    if (languages.hasOwnProperty(lang))
      langs.push(languages[lang]);

  langs.sort(function (a, b) {
    if (a.lang > b.lang) return 1;
    if (a.lang < b.lang) return -1;
    return 0;
  });

  for (var i = 0; i < langs.length; ++i)
  {
    var language = jQuery("#language-template").html();
    var lang = langs[i];
    language = language.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", lang.lang)
                       .replace("{{NAME}}", lang.user)
                       .replace("{{SIZE}}", lang.size)
                       .replace("{{LINK}}", lang.link);
    language = jQuery(language);
    jQuery("#languages").append(language);
  }

}
body { text-align: left !important}

#answer-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 290px;
  float: left;
}

#language-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 290px;
  float: left;
}

table thead {
  font-weight: bold;
}

table td {
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="//cdn.sstatic.net/codegolf/all.css?v=83c949450c8b">
<div id="answer-list">
  <h2>Leaderboard</h2>
  <table class="answer-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="answers">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<div id="language-list">
  <h2>Winners by Language</h2>
  <table class="language-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="languages">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="answer-template">
    <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="language-template">
    <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Related. \$\endgroup\$ – xnor May 12 '16 at 2:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can we assume that n! will fit within our languages' native integer type? \$\endgroup\$ – Alex A. May 12 '16 at 2:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ @AlexA. Yes you can. \$\endgroup\$ – Arcturus May 12 '16 at 3:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can n be an input string? \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien May 12 '16 at 3:10
  • 15
    \$\begingroup\$ I think this would be a better question if you were not allowed to assume n! would fit into your integer type! Well, maybe another time. \$\endgroup\$ – A Simmons May 12 '16 at 10:45

49 Answers 49

43
\$\begingroup\$

Python 2, 27 bytes

f=lambda n:n and n/5+f(n/5)

The ending zeroes are limited by factors of 5. The number of multiples of 5 that are at most n is n/5 (with floor division), but this doesn't count the repeated factors in multiples of 25, 125, .... To get those, divide n by 5 and recurse.

\$\endgroup\$
19
\$\begingroup\$

Jelly, 5 bytes

!Æfċ5

Uses the counterproductive approach of finding the factorial then factorising it again, checking for the exponent of 5 in the prime factorisation.

Try it online!

!              Factorial
 Æf            List of prime factors, e.g. 120 -> [2, 2, 2, 3, 5]
   ċ5          Count number of 5s
\$\endgroup\$
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ yikes. Talk about trade-offs! To get the code down to 5 bytes, increase the memory and time by absurd amounts. \$\endgroup\$ – Ross Presser May 12 '16 at 16:18
19
\$\begingroup\$

Mornington Crescent, 1949 1909 bytes

Take Northern Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take District Line to Parsons Green
Take District Line to Cannon Street
Take Circle Line to Victoria
Take Victoria Line to Seven Sisters
Take Victoria Line to Victoria
Take Circle Line to Victoria
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Hammersmith
Take District Line to Turnham Green
Take District Line to Hammersmith
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Hammersmith
Take District Line to Turnham Green
Take District Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Hammersmith
Take Circle Line to Blackfriars
Take Circle Line to Hammersmith
Take Circle Line to Notting Hill Gate
Take Circle Line to Notting Hill Gate
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Hammersmith
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Blackfriars
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Temple
Take Circle Line to Hammersmith
Take Circle Line to Cannon Street
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Blackfriars
Take Circle Line to Hammersmith
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Cannon Street
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Cannon Street
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Blackfriars
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Becontree
Take District Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take Northern Line to Angel
Take Northern Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take District Line to Upminster
Take District Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take Northern Line to Mornington Crescent

-40 bytes thanks to NieDzejkob

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ And this is now my most upvoted answer. \$\endgroup\$ – pppery May 17 '16 at 13:25
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ A brief explanation for those of us who are Mornington Crescent-challenged would be cool. :) \$\endgroup\$ – Robert Benson Mar 23 '17 at 13:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ -40 bytes by using shorter line names where possible. \$\endgroup\$ – NieDzejkob Mar 15 '18 at 17:02
18
\$\begingroup\$

Pyth, 6 bytes

/P.!Q5

Try it here.

/    5   Count 5's in
 P        the prime factorization of
  .!Q      the factorial of the input.

Alternative 7-byte:

st.u/N5

The cumulative reduce .u/N5 repeatedly floor-divides by 5 until it gets a repeat, which in this case happens after it hits 0.

34 -> [34, 6, 1, 0]

The first element is then removed (t) and the rest is summed (s).

\$\endgroup\$
13
\$\begingroup\$

Actually, 10 bytes

!$R;≈$l@l-

Try it online!

Note that the last test case fails when running Seriously on CPython because math.factorial uses a C extension (which is limited to 64-bit integers). Running Seriously on PyPy works fine, though.

Explanation:

!$R;≈$l@l-
!           factorial of input
 $R         stringify, reverse
   ;≈$      make a copy, cast to int, then back to string (removes leading zeroes)
      l@l-  difference in lengths (the number of leading zeroes removed by the int conversion)
\$\endgroup\$
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Oh wow, I like how this method doesn't use the dividing by 5 trick. \$\endgroup\$ – Arcturus May 12 '16 at 4:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ I count 12 bytes on this one \$\endgroup\$ – Score_Under May 14 '16 at 2:09
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Score_Under Actually uses the CP437 code page, not UTF-8. Each character is one byte. \$\endgroup\$ – Mego May 14 '16 at 2:41
9
\$\begingroup\$

Haskell, 26 bytes

f 0=0
f n=(+)=<<f$div n 5

Floor-divides the input by 5, then adds the result to the function called on it. The expression (+)=<<f takes an input x and outputs x+(f x).

Shortened from:

f 0=0
f n=div n 5+f(div n 5)

f 0=0
f n|k<-div n 5=k+f k

A non-recursive expression gave 28 bytes:

f n=sum[n`div`5^i|i<-[1..n]]
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is i a counter from 1..n? \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien May 12 '16 at 3:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ @CᴏɴᴏʀO'Bʀɪᴇɴ Yes, though only up to log_5(n) matters, the rest gives 0. \$\endgroup\$ – xnor May 12 '16 at 3:36
8
\$\begingroup\$

MATL, 9 bytes

:"@Yf5=vs

Try it online!

This works for very large numbers, as it avoids computing the factorial.

Like other answers, this exploits the fact that the number of times 2 appears as divisor of the factorial is greater or equal than the number of times 5 appears.

:     % Implicit input. Inclusive range from 1 to that
"     % For each
  @   %   Push that value
  Yf  %   Array of prime factors
  5=  %   True for 5, false otherwise
  v   %   Concatenate vertically all stack contents
  s   %   Sum
\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

05AB1E, 5 bytes

Would be 4 bytes if we could guarantee n>4

Code:

Î!Ó7è

Explanation:

Î        # push 0 then input
  !      # factorial of n: 10 -> 2628800
   Ó     # get primefactor exponents -> [8, 4, 2, 1]
    7è   # get list[7] (list is indexed as string) -> 2
         # implicit output of number of 5s or 0 if n < 5

Alternate, much faster, 6 byte solution: Inspired by Luis Mendo's MATL answer

LÒ€`5QO

Explanation:

L         # push range(1,n) inclusive, n=10 -> [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
 Ò        # push prime factors of each number in list -> [[], [2], [3], [2, 2], [5], [2, 3], [7], [2, 2, 2], [3, 3], [2, 5]]
  €`      # flatten list of lists to list [2, 3, 2, 2, 5, 2, 3, 7, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 2, 5]
    5Q    # and compare each number to 5 -> [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1]
      O   # sum -> 2

Edit: removed solutions using ¢ (count) as all primes containing 5 would be counted as 5 e.g. 53.

Edit 2: added a more efficient solution for higher input as comparison.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, instead of , 5Q should work. Nice answer though! :) \$\endgroup\$ – Adnan May 12 '16 at 8:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ I was going to test on larger inputs with the comment "wouldn't this fail if the output was > 9", but boy 05AB1E's implementation of Ó is slow \$\endgroup\$ – Sp3000 May 12 '16 at 9:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Btw, the first code can also be Î!Ó2é. The bug was fixed yesterday. \$\endgroup\$ – Adnan May 12 '16 at 10:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you're using utf-8, Î!Ó7è is 8 bytes, and the "6 byte" solution is 10 bytes \$\endgroup\$ – Score_Under May 14 '16 at 2:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Score_Under Yes that is correct. However, 05AB1E uses the CP-1252 encoding. \$\endgroup\$ – Adnan May 14 '16 at 8:50
6
\$\begingroup\$

Matlab (59) (54)(39)

Hey dawg !!!! we heard you like maths ....

  @(n)sum(fix(n./5.^(1:fix(log(n)/1.6))))
  • This is based on my created answer in code review.

  • further than what is mentioned in my answer in code review, the formula for number of zeros in factorial(n) is Sum(n/(5^k)) where k varies between 1 and log_5(n)

  • The only trivial reason why it cant get golfier is that log5 isnt available in matlab as a builtin , thus I replaced log(5) by 1.6, doesnt matter because it will be anyways floored.

Give it a try

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ A couple of questions. 1. How do you actually run this in Matlab? 2. What is the result for n=1? \$\endgroup\$ – Stuart Bruff May 12 '16 at 14:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ @StuartBruff to run this type ans(1) and it does return 0. \$\endgroup\$ – Abr001am May 12 '16 at 16:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ OK. Thanks. Interesting. I haven't used function handles much in Matlab, so was a little puzzled as to how to run it ... why doesn't the ans() count towards the total? Neat answer though, I tried it in Mathcad but had to modify the upper limit of the sum as Mathcad autodecrements the summation variable if the "upper" is less than the "lower" limit (and hence my question about 0). \$\endgroup\$ – Stuart Bruff May 13 '16 at 12:27
5
\$\begingroup\$

Mathematica, 20 bytes

IntegerExponent[#!]&

IntegerExponent counts the zeros. For fun, here's a version that doesn't calculate the factorial:

Tr[#~IntegerExponent~5&~Array~#]&
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think Array saves a byte on the second solution. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender May 12 '16 at 12:54
5
\$\begingroup\$

C, 28 bytes

f(n){return(n/=5)?n+f(n):n;}

Explanation

The number of trailing zeros is equal to the number of fives that make up the factorial. Of all the 1..n, one-fifth of them contribute a five, so we start with n/5. Of these n/5, a fifth are multiples of 25, so contribute an extra five, and so on. We end up with f(n) = n/5 + n/25 + n/125 + ..., which is f(n) = n/5 + f(n/5). We do need to terminate the recursion when n reaches zero; also we take advantage of the sequence point at ?: to divide n before the addition.

As a bonus, this code is much faster than that which visits each 1..n (and much, much faster than computing the factorial).

Test program

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    while(*++argv) {
        int i = atoi(*argv);
        printf("%d: %d\n",i,f(i));
    }
}

Test output

1: 0
4: 0
5: 1
24: 4
25: 6
124: 28
125: 31
666: 165
2016: 502
2147483644: 536870901
2147483647: 536870902

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ +1 for an excellent explanation \$\endgroup\$ – Titus Jun 5 '18 at 10:42
4
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript ES6, 20 bytes

f=x=>x&&x/5+f(x/5)|0

Same tactic as in xnor's answer, but shorter.

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

Julia, 34 31 30 bytes

n->find(digits(prod(1:n)))[]-1

This is an anonymous function that accepts any signed integer type and returns an integer. To call it, assign it to a variable. The larger test cases require passing n as a larger type, such as a BigInt.

We compute the factorial of n (manually using prod is shorter than the built-in factorial), get an array of its digits in reverse order, find the indices of the nonzero elements, get the first such index, and subtract 1.

Try it online! (includes all but the last test case because the last takes too long)

Saved a byte thanks to Dennis!

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

C, 36

r;f(n){for(r=0;n/=5;)r+=n;return r;}

Same method as @xnor's answer of counting 5s, but just using a simple for loop instead of recursion.

Ideone.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ @TobySpeight there you go. \$\endgroup\$ – Digital Trauma May 13 '16 at 17:01
3
\$\begingroup\$

Retina, 33 bytes

Takes input in unary.

Returns output in unary.

+`^(?=1)(1{5})*1*
$#1$*1;$#1$*
;

(Note the trailing linefeed.)

Try it online!

How it works:

The first stage:

+`^(?=1)(1{5})*1*
$#1$*1;$#1$*

Slightly ungolfed:

+`^(?=1)(11111)*1*\b
$#1$*1;$#1$*1

What it does:

  • Firstly, find the greatest number of 11111 that can be matched.
  • Replace by that number
  • Effectively floor-divides by 5.
  • The lookahead (?=1) assures that the number is positive.
  • The +` means repeat until idempotent.
  • So, the first stage is "repeated floor-division by 5"

If the input is 100 (in unary), then the text is now:

;;1111;11111111111111111111

Second stage:

;

Just removes all semi-colons.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Ruby, 22 bytes

One of the few times where the Ruby 0 being truthy is a problem for byte count.

f=->n{n>0?f[n/=5]+n:0}
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ wait why is 0 truthy? \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien May 12 '16 at 4:00
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @CᴏɴᴏʀO'Bʀɪᴇɴ In Ruby, nil and false are falsey, and nothing else is. There are a lot of cases where helps out in golf, since having 0 be truthy means the index and regex index functions in Ruby return nil if there is no match instead of -1, and some where it is a problem, like empty strings still being truthy. \$\endgroup\$ – Value Ink May 12 '16 at 4:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @KevinLau-notKenny That does make sense. \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien May 12 '16 at 4:25
2
\$\begingroup\$

Perl 6, 23 bytes

{[+] -$_,$_,*div 5…0}
{sum -$_,$_,*div 5...0}

I could get it shorter if ^... was added to Perl 6 {sum $_,*div 5^...0}.
It should be more memory efficient for larger numbers if you added a lazy modifier between sum and the sequence generator.

Explanation:

{ # implicitly uses $_ as its parameter
  sum

    # produce a sequence
    -$_,     # negate the next value
     $_,     # start of the sequence

     * div 5 # Whatever lambda that floor divides its input by 5

             # the input being the previous value in the sequence,
             # and the result gets appended to the sequence

     ...     # continue to do that until:

     0       # it reaches 0
}

Test:

#! /usr/bin/env perl6

use v6.c;
use Test;

my @test = (
     1,   0,
     5,   1,
   100,  24,
   666, 165,
  2016, 502,
  1234567891011121314151617181920,
        308641972752780328537904295461,

  # [*] 5 xx 100
  7888609052210118054117285652827862296732064351090230047702789306640625,
        1972152263052529513529321413206965574183016087772557511925697326660156,
);

plan @test / 2;

# make it a postfix operator, because why not
my &postfix:<!0> = {[+] -$_,$_,*div 5...0}

for @test -> $input, $expected {
  is $input!0, $expected, "$input => $expected"
}

diag "runs in {now - INIT now} seconds"
1..7
ok 1 - 1 => 0
ok 2 - 5 => 1
ok 3 - 100 => 24
ok 4 - 666 => 165
ok 5 - 2016 => 502
ok 6 - 1234567891011121314151617181920 => 308641972752780328537904295461
ok 7 - 7888609052210118054117285652827862296732064351090230047702789306640625 => 1972152263052529513529321413206965574183016087772557511925697326660156
# runs in 0.0252692 seconds

( That last line is slightly misleading, as MoarVM has to start, load the Perl 6 compiler and runtime, compile the code, and run it. So it actually takes about a second and a half in total.
That is still significantly faster than it was to check the result of the last test with WolframAlpha.com )

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Mathcad, [tbd] bytes

enter image description here

Mathcad is sort of mathematical "whiteboard" that allows 2D entry of expressions, text and plots. It uses mathematical symbols for many operations, such as summation, differentiation and integration. Programming operators are special symbols, usually entered as single keyboard combinations of control and/or shift on a standard key.

What you see above is exactly how the Mathcad worksheet looks as it is typed in and as Mathcad evaluates it. For example, changing n from 2016 to any other value will cause Mathcad to update the result from 502 to whatever the new value is.

http://www.ptc.com/engineering-math-software/mathcad/free-download


Mathcad's byte equivalence scoring method is yet to be determined. Taking a symbol equivalence, the solution takes about 24 "bytes" (the while operator can only be entered using the "ctl-]" key combination (or from a toolbar)). Agawa001's Matlab method takes about 37 bytes when translated into Mathcad (the summation operator is entered by ctl-shft-$).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Sounds a stunning tool to handle, I wont spare a second downloading it ! \$\endgroup\$ – Abr001am May 13 '16 at 13:42
2
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dc, 12 bytes

[5/dd0<f+]sf

This defines a function f which consumes its input from top of stack, and leaves its output at top of stack. See my C answer for the mathematical basis. We repeatedly divide by 5, accumulating the values on the stack, then add all the results:

5/d   # divide by 5, and leave a copy behind
d0<   # still greater than zero?
f+    # if so, apply f to the new value and add

Test program

# read input values
?
# print prefix
[  # for each value
    # print prefix
    [> ]ndn[ ==> ]n
    # call f(n)
    lfx
    # print suffix
    n[  
]n
    # repeat for each value on stack
    z0<t
]
# define and run test function 't'
dstx

Test output

./79762.dc <<<'1234567891011121314151617181920 2016 666 125 124 25 24 5 4 1'
1 ==> 0  
4 ==> 0  
5 ==> 1  
24 ==> 4  
25 ==> 6  
124 ==> 28  
125 ==> 31  
666 ==> 165  
2016 ==> 502  
1234567891011121314151617181920 ==> 308641972752780328537904295461  
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1
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Jolf, 13 bytes

Ώmf?H+γ/H5ΏγH

Defines a recursive function which is called on the input. Try it here!

Ώmf?H+γ/H5ΏγH  Ώ(H) = floor(H ? (γ = H/5) + Ώ(γ) : H)
Ώ              Ώ(H) =
       /H5                           H/5
      γ                         (γ =    )
     +    Ώγ                              + Ώ(γ)
   ?H       H               H ?                  : H
 mf                   floor(                        )
               // called implicitly with input
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1
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J, 28 17 16 bytes

<.@+/@(%5^>:@i.)

Pretty much the same as the non-recursive technique from xnor's answer.


Here's an older version I have kept here because I personally like it more, clocking in at 28 bytes:

+/@>@{:@(0<;._1@,'0'&=@":@!)

Whilst not needed, I have included x: in the test cases for extended precision.

   tf0 =: +/@>@{:@(0<;._1@,'0'&=@":@!@x:)
   tf0 5
1
   tf0 100
24

   tf0g =: tf0"0
   tf0g 1 5 100 666 2016
0 1 24 165 502

The last number doesn't work with this function.

Explanation

This works by calculating n!, converting it to a string, and checking each member for equality with '0'. For n = 15, this process would be:

15
15! => 1307674368000
": 1307674368000 => '1307674368000'
'0' = '1307674368000' => 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1

Now, we use ;._1 to split the list on its first element (zero), boxing each split result, yielding a box filled with aces (a:) or runs of 1s, like so:

┌┬─┬┬┬┬┬┬┬─────┐
││1│││││││1 1 1│
└┴─┴┴┴┴┴┴┴─────┘

We simple obtain the last member ({:), unbox it (>), and perform a summation over it +/, yielding the number of zeroes.

Here is the more readable version:

split =: <;._1@,
tostr =: ":
is =: =
last =: {:
unbox =: >
sum =: +/
precision =: x:
n =: 15

NB. the function itself
tf0 =: sum unbox last 0 split '0' is tostr ! precision n
tf0 =: sum @ unbox @ last @ (0 split '0'&is @ tostr @ ! @ precision)
tf0 =: +/ @ > @ {: @ (0 <;._1@, '0'&= @ ": @ ! )
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  • \$\begingroup\$ >:@i. can be written 1+i. to save a byte. \$\endgroup\$ – algorithmshark May 18 '16 at 21:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Your older version can be made into [:#.~'0'=":@! for 13 bytes by changing the method of counting the trailing 1s. \$\endgroup\$ – cole Dec 28 '17 at 1:11
1
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Python 3, 52 bytes

g=lambda x,y=1,z=0:z-x if y>x else g(x,y*5,z+x//y)
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  • \$\begingroup\$ This doesn't work, try the test cases. \$\endgroup\$ – xnor May 12 '16 at 3:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ It should work now. \$\endgroup\$ – Magenta May 12 '16 at 15:26
1
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Pyke, 5 bytes

SBP5/

Try it here!

S     -    range(1,input()+1)
 B    -   product(^)
  P   -  prime_factors(^)
   5/ - count(^, 5)
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1
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RETURN, 17 bytes

[$[5÷\%$F+][]?]=F

Try it here.

Recursive operator lambda. Usage:

[$[5÷\%$F+][]?]=F666F

Explanation

[             ]=F  Lambda -> Operator F
 $                 Check if top of stack is truthy
  [       ][]?     Conditional
   5÷\%$F+         If so, do x/5+F(x/5)
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1
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Perl, 24 22 + 1 (-p flag) = 23 bytes

$\+=$_=$_/5|0while$_}{

Using:

> echo 2016 | perl -pe '$\+=$_=$_/5|0while$_}{'

Full program:

while (<>) {
# code above added by -p
    while ($_) {
        $\ += $_ = int($_ / 5);
    }
} {
# code below added by -p
    print;  # prints $_ (undef here) and $\
}
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1
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Java, 38 bytes

int z(int n){return n>0?n/5+z(n/5):0;}

Full program, with ungolfed method:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Q79762{
    int zero_ungolfed(int number){
        if(number == 0){
            return 0;
        }
        return number/5 + zero_ungolfed(number/5);
    }
    int z(int n){return n>0?n/5+z(n/5):0;}
    public static void main(String args[]){
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        int n = sc.nextInt();
        sc.close();
        System.out.println(new Q79762().zero_ungolfed(n));
        System.out.println(new Q79762().z(n));
    }
}
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1
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J, 7 bytes

Monadic function, taking argument on the right.

3{:@q:!

If x is positive, x q: y returns the exponents in a prime factorization of y, for only the first x primes. The 3-rd prime is 5 and {: takes the tail of a list.

Note that you have to input integers with an x at the end, or else J will treat them as floats.

   3{:@q:! 100x
24
   3{:@q:! 666x
165
   3{:@q:! 2016x
502

Try it yourself at tryj.tk, though be warned that this online interpreter will complain if you try anything larger than 1343.

If you want something that doesn't compute n! and hence doesn't require it fit in an integer, use the recursive solution <.@%&5(+$:@)^:*. (tryj.tk is still whiny on large inputs.)

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1
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Ruby, 70 61 51 49 bytes

Version 3 with thanks to Kenny Lau and daniero

->n{(n-n.to_s(5).chars.map(&:to_i).reduce(:+))/4}

Edit: Turns out you can save two bytes by mapping to_i before you reduce. Weird :P

This function subtracts the sum of n's base 5 digits from n and then divides that result by 4. This is related to the sum of the geometric series 1+5+25+..+5**n = (5**n+1)/4.

As an example (again, with thanks to Kenny Lau), consider 358 (2413 in base 5) minus its base 5 digits.

2413-2-4-1-3 
= (2000-2) + (400-4) + (10-1) + (3-3)
# consider that 1000-1=444 and you'll see why every 5**n is multiplied by 4
= 2*444 + 4*44 + 1*4 + 3*0
= 2*(4*5**0+4*5**1+4*5**2) + 4*(4*5**0+4*5**1) + 1*(4*5**0) + 3*()
= 348

Divide 348 by 4 and you get f(358) = 87.

Version 2 with thanks to Kenny Lau

->n{s=(1..n).reduce(:*).to_s;s.size-s.reverse.to_i.to_s.size}

This function calculates n! then subtracts the size of n! from the size of (n!).reverse.to_i.to_s, which removes all the zeroes, thus, returning the size of the zeroes themselves.

Version 1

->n{s=n.to_s(5).chars;(0...s.size).reduce{|a,b|a+(s[0,b]*'').to_i(5)}}

This a variation of the "How many 5s are there in the prime factorization of n!?" trick that uses Ruby's simple base conversion builtins.

The golfing is a bit of a pain though, with converting from Integer to String to Array, grabbing part of the Array and converting that to String to Integer again for the reduce. Any golfing suggestions are welcome.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It's slightly shorter to map to_i before reducing: ->n{(n-n.to_s(5).chars.map(&:to_i).reduce(:+))/4} (saves two bytes) \$\endgroup\$ – daniero May 16 '16 at 16:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ @daniero I would not have expected that. Thanks :D \$\endgroup\$ – Sherlock9 May 16 '16 at 17:37
1
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Julia, 21 19 bytes

!n=n<5?0:!(n÷=5)+n

Uses the recursive formula from xnor's answer.

Try it online!

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1
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Dyalog APL, 9 bytes

⊥⍨'0'=⍕!⎕

prompt for number

! factorialize

stringify

'0'= check equality to character zero

⊥⍨ count trailing trues*


*Literally it is a mixed-base to base-10 conversion, using the boolean list as both number and base:

⊥⍨0 1 0 1 1 is the same as 0 1 0 1 1⊥⍨0 1 0 1 1 which is 0×(0×1×0×1×1) 1×(1×0×1×1) 0×(0×1×1) 1×(1×1) + 1×(1) which again is two (the number of trailing 1s).

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