16
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Write a full program to find whether the binary representation of a number is palindrome or not?

Sample Input
5

Sample Output
YES

Print YES if binary representation is palindrome and NO otherwise.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What should be the output when it's not a palindrome? \$\endgroup\$ – Dogbert Feb 8 '11 at 15:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @dogbert It should be 'NO' without the quotes. \$\endgroup\$ – fR0DDY Feb 8 '11 at 15:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ How do you know it's a palindrome? Because the values from the first nonzero to the end of the "string" are palindromic? This smells really bad to me, as a challenge. \$\endgroup\$ – jcolebrand Feb 9 '11 at 23:40
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Much as I <3 gnibbler's answer, it's not actually the shortest solution, and any question tagged [code-golf] should pick the shortest solution as the winner. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Jester-Young Feb 10 '11 at 3:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Input is given how? \$\endgroup\$ – Joey Mar 2 '11 at 8:34

25 Answers 25

5
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Golfscript -- 22 chars

~2base.-1%="YES""NO"if
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24
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Python - 46 chars

n=bin(input())[2:]
print'YNEOS'[n!=n[::-1]::2]
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Wow. What does [n!=n[::-1]::2] do? \$\endgroup\$ – Dogbert Feb 8 '11 at 21:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Dogbert, n[::-1] is a slice. The start and end indexs are empty, so it means the whole string. The stepsize is -1, so when you see [::-1] it is a short way to reverse a string/list etc. So n!=n[::-1] is True (ie 1) when n is not a palindrome. Therefore when n is a palindrome, you get 'YNEOS'[0::2] - start at 0 and take every 2nd character. When n is not a palindrome you get 'YNEOS'[1::2] - start at 1 and take every second character :) \$\endgroup\$ – gnibbler Feb 8 '11 at 22:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think people are voting for the slice trick :), rightly so. :P +1 \$\endgroup\$ – st0le Feb 9 '11 at 6:08
4
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Ruby, 41 39

$><<%w(YES NO)[(n="%b"%$*)<=>n.reverse]

Thanks to Michael Kohl's "%b"%gets trick.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Very nice, I like this a lot! +1 for using the spaceship in a creative way :-) \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Kohl Mar 6 '11 at 17:23
4
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C 84 81 74 Characters

r;main(v,x){for(scanf("%d",&v),x=v;v;v/=2)r=r*2|v&1;puts(r-x?"NO":"YES");}

It does not use any function like string reverse.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Couldn't you save a few characters changing r<<=1 into r*=2, v>>=1 into v/=2 and {} into ;? \$\endgroup\$ – user56228 Sep 23 '16 at 13:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @paxdiablo Indeed. Changed. Thanks a lot. \$\endgroup\$ – fR0DDY Sep 24 '16 at 7:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ r*=2,r|=v&1 -> r=r*2|v&1 (-2) \$\endgroup\$ – Titus Sep 24 '16 at 13:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ and moving that term to the body of the loop saves another byte. \$\endgroup\$ – Titus Sep 24 '16 at 13:01
3
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Javascript - 79 77 chars

alert((a=(prompt()*1).toString(2))-a.split("").reverse().join("")?"NO":"YES")

More information

prompt()*1 : Quick trick to convert string to number.

.toString(2) : That's how you convert to binary in javascript.

a.split("").reverse().join("") : There is no native support to reverse string, so you have to convert string to array and array to string.

("[part1]" - "[part 2]")?"YES":"NO" : - is a replacement for != to save 1 char.

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Excellent explanation. \$\endgroup\$ – TehShrike Mar 3 '11 at 1:44
2
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PHP - 41

<?=strrev($n=decbin(`cat`))==$n?@YES:@NO;

Test:

php 713.php <<< 5
YES
php 713.php <<< 6
NO
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  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ If you're going to use shell calls to get the input, might as well use m4 instead of cat to save one. There's also pg and dd (which writes some bytes to stderr). \$\endgroup\$ – Nabb Feb 8 '11 at 15:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Have You tried that on Windows? ;) \$\endgroup\$ – Titus Sep 24 '16 at 13:19
2
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Perl, 45 characters

$_=sprintf'%b',shift;
print reverse==$_?YES:NO
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2
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Ruby, 43 characters

puts((n="%b"%gets)==n.reverse ? "YES":"NO")
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Save 2: puts (n="%b"%gets)==n.reverse ? :YES: :NO \$\endgroup\$ – Phrogz Mar 2 '11 at 16:15
2
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Windows PowerShell, 67

('NO','YES')[($a=[Convert]::ToString("$input",2))-eq-join$a[64..0]]
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2
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05AB1E, 17 12 bytes (non-competing)

‘NO…Ü‘#EbÂQè

-5 bytes thanks to Adnan.

Try it online!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hey nice! I tried to golf it a bit and came to 12 bytes ‘NO…Ü‘#EbÂQè :). \$\endgroup\$ – Adnan Sep 25 '16 at 19:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ Great! I still don't know how to use/make compressed strings. Also, I didn't know the function bin() existed \$\endgroup\$ – acrolith Sep 25 '16 at 19:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ There is actually a detailed example here, if you are interested :). \$\endgroup\$ – Adnan Sep 25 '16 at 20:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ This answer is non-competing since the question predates the language. \$\endgroup\$ – Okx Feb 2 '17 at 20:08
1
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Python (51)

n=bin(input())[2:]
print'YES'if n==n[::-1]else'NO'
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  • \$\begingroup\$ You can ['NO','YES'][n==n[::-1]] \$\endgroup\$ – Karl Napf Nov 3 '16 at 15:35
1
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Perl (73)

No string reverse:

print f(split//,sprintf'%b',shift);
sub f{@_<=1?YES:shift!=pop()?NO:f(@_)}
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1
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Perl (127)

This one constructs all palindromes up to 2^32.

sub f{
    my($x,$l)=@_;
    $l+=2,f(($x<<$_)+1+(1<<$l-1),$l)?return 1:0 for 1..15-$l/2;
    $x-$ARGV[0]?0:1
}
print f(0,1)+f(0,0)+f(1,1)?YES:NO
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1
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Bash, 55 chars

C=`dc<<<$1\ 2op`;[ $C = `rev<<<$C` ]&&echo YES||echo NO
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, technically that's bash and dc and rev :-) \$\endgroup\$ – user56228 Sep 23 '16 at 13:26
1
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J - 33 characters

13 : ';(]-:|.)#:y{''YES'';''NO'''
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1
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J: 24

((-:|.)#:x){2 3$'NO YES'

eg:

   ((-:|.)#:5){2 3$'NO YES'
YES
   ((-:|.)#:12){2 3$'NO YES'
NO
   ((-:|.)#:125){2 3$'NO YES'
NO
   ((-:|.)#:63){2 3$'NO YES'
YES
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1
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Haskell (79)

0?k=n;n?k=div n 2?(n`mod`2+k*2);f x|x==x?0="YES"|True="No";main=interact$f.read
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Don't forget: In Haskell, this will work with really big numbers. \$\endgroup\$ – FUZxxl Feb 8 '11 at 21:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ Ahm, that's actually 79 characters. ;-) \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Kohl Feb 8 '11 at 22:49
1
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C (77 bytes)

r,t;main(n){for(t=n=atoi(gets(&n));n;r*=2,r|=n%2,n/=2);puts(r-t?"NO":"YES");}

TEST

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1
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Pyth, 18 bytes

%2>"YNEOS"!qJ.BQ_J

Also 18 bytes:

@,"NO""YES"qJ.BQ_J
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1
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PHP, not competing

I wanted to do it without using strings at all.

iterative solution, 78 bytes

for($x=log($n=$argv[1],2);$i<$x&($n>>$i^$n>>$x-$i^1);$i++);echo$i<$x/2?NO:YES;

recursive solution, 113 bytes

function p($n,$x=0){return$n<2?$n:is_pal(($n&(1<<$x=log($n,2)/2)-1)^$n>>$x+!is_int($x));}echo p($argv[1])?YES:NO;

If n is a binary palindrome, the upper half xor the lower half is also a binary palindrome and vice versa.


a port of the excellent C answer from fR0DDY, 58 bytes

for($x=2*$v=$argv[1];$x/=2;$r=$r*2|$x&1);echo$r-$v?NO:YES;

a binary reverse. Columbus´ egg.

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1
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Retina, 80 78 bytes (non-competing)

Byte count assumes ISO 8859-1 encoding.

.+
$*
+`(1+)\1
${1}0
01
1
^((.)*?).??((?<-2>.)*$)
$1¶$3
O$^`.(?=.*¶)

^(.*)¶\1

Try it online

Convert to unary. Convert that to binary. Cut the number in half and remove a middle digit if there is one. Reverse the first half. Match if both halves are equal.

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1
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Jelly, 12 bytes (non-competing)

BṚ⁼Bị“YES“NO

Try it online!

Explanation:

BṚ⁼Bị“YES“NO Main link. Arguments: z.
B            Binary representation of z.
 Ṛ           Reversed.
   B         Binary representation of z.
  ⁼          Check if x is equal to y.
     “YES“NO [['Y', 'E', 'S'], ['N', 'O']]
    ị        xth element of y (1-indexed).

Before printing, Python's str function is mapped through a list, and then the elements are concatenated, so you see YES or NO.

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0
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Haxe, 164 bytes

Works only with system platforms (php, neko, cpp, etc.). Takes input through command line arguments.

class T{static function main(){var r:Dynamic=Std.parseInt(Sys.args()[0]);var s=r.toString(2);trace(s==[for(i in-s.length+1...1)s.charAt(-i)].join('')?"YES":"NO");}}
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0
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Matlab, 71 bytes

function paly(n)
v=de2bi(n);
if v==v(numel(v):-1:1)
'YES'
else
'NO'
end
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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to PPCG! \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Sep 24 '16 at 17:56
-1
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Java, 97 85 characters

return Integer.toBinaryString(i).equals(new StringBuffer(s).reverse()+"")?"YES":"NO";
    String s=Integer.toBinaryString(i);
    return s.equals(new StringBuffer(s).reverse()+"")?"YES":"NO";
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  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ The task calls for a full program. \$\endgroup\$ – Joey Mar 2 '11 at 14:32

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