23
\$\begingroup\$

Saw this in a PHP challenge. The objective is to make a chessboard with 64 squares (8*8) with the minimum amount of code. Simple enough, I made mine in PHP in 356 bytes (not impressive, I know) and I would like to see some other aproaches. This can be made in a language of your choice, as long as you keep it vanilla, so no imports. Smallest byte count wins.

The output should look like this:

screencap

And my code:

<table><?php
$c='black';function p($c,$n){echo'<td style="width:50px;height:50px;background:'.$c.'"></td>';if($n==1){echo"<tr>";}}for($i=1;$i<=64;$i++){if($i%8==0&&$c=="black"){$c="white";$n=1;}elseif($i%8==0&&$c=="white"){$c="black";$n=1;}elseif(isset($n)&&$n==1){$n=0;}elseif($c=="black"){$n=0;$c="white";}elseif($c=="white"){$n=0;$c="black";}p($c,$n);}

Or readable:

<table><tr>
<?php
$color = 'black';
function printcolor($color, $nl) {

    echo '<td style="width:50px; height:50px; background:' . $color . '"></td>';
    if ($nl == true) {
        echo "</tr><tr>";
    }
}
for ($i=1; $i<=64;$i++) {
    if ($i % 8 == 0 && $color == "black") {
        $color = "white";
        $nl = true;
    } elseif ($i % 8 == 0 && $color == "white") {
        $color = "black";
        $nl = true;
    } elseif (isset($nl) && $nl == true) {      
        $nl = false;
    } elseif ($color == "black") {
        $nl = false;
        $color = "white";           
        } 
    elseif ($color == "white")  {
        $nl = false;
        $color = "black";
    }       
    printcolor($color, $nl);
}

Edit:

Sorry I wasn't very specific at first:

  • Squares should have 50px * 50px except for vectorial images.
  • Output format or size is not relevant nor it needs to be an image.
  • For evaluation purposes the output must be visible such as in an image file or a screenshot
  • No libraries written after the challenge was posted
\$\endgroup\$
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to PPCG, as it stands, this challenge doesn't really have anything to do with PHP, so I changed your tags. Also, I believe your reference implementation belongs as an answer, not in your question. As Stewie brought up, you should specify the required size of the image output, as well as things like colour specifics and whether a lossy image is allowed. \$\endgroup\$ – FryAmTheEggman Feb 4 '16 at 17:04
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ So some ASCII-magic is not allowed? :( \$\endgroup\$ – Denker Feb 4 '16 at 17:13
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ How basic is basic? What is the definition of an "import"? \$\endgroup\$ – Doorknob Feb 4 '16 at 17:59
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ It doesn't need to be an image but each square must be at least 50px? That seems self-contradictory to me. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Taylor Feb 4 '16 at 19:48
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ Programming languages here are very diverse, including some that are made specifically for golfing and have many builtin functions. Therefore, I recommend that the restriction to non-library functions be removed, and that this question instead follow the default (all imports counted in byte count; no libraries written after the challenge was posted). \$\endgroup\$ – lirtosiast Feb 5 '16 at 3:23

35 Answers 35

13
\$\begingroup\$

Octave, 20 18 bytes

Thanks to @Bruno for shaving off 2 bytes.

imshow(invhilb(8))

Result:

enter image description here

This answer uses a technique found here. It also relies on the automatic scaling of images in Octave depending on the size of the figure window.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @AlexA. I'm also not entirely convinced that the squares must be exactly 50x50 pixels, as the very next rule says "Output format or size is not relevant...". People have asked for clarification in the comments, but the question has not been updated. \$\endgroup\$ – beaker Feb 5 '16 at 2:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ Edited the question. Tested your code and it's working, so currently you have the lowest byte count :) \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 5 '16 at 10:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also removed the >0 and it still works so you can shave 2 bytes there \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 5 '16 at 10:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Bruno What? That is wild. So it's apparently clamping the values of the matrix (which are all <<0 or >>1) to 0 and 1. Thanks for the tip, I'll update! :D \$\endgroup\$ – beaker Feb 5 '16 at 15:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ Congrats on 2k! \$\endgroup\$ – NoOneIsHere Aug 16 '16 at 22:33
26
\$\begingroup\$

vim, 47 46 44 43

crossed out 44 is still regular 44...

iP1 400 <C-p><cr><esc>50i1<esc>YpVr0yk3PyG49PyG:m$<cr>p2GyG3P
i          enter insert mode
P1         signal to NetPPM that we're using black&white (PBM) format
400        width
<C-p>      fancy trick that inserts the other 400 for height
<cr><esc>  exit insert mode on the next line
50i1<esc>  insert 50 '1's (black)
YpVr0      insert 50 '0's (white) by duplicating the line and replacing all chars
yk         copy both lines (yank-up)
3P         paste three times; this leaves us on line two
yG         copy from line 2 to end of file (this is a full row of pixels now)
49P        we need 50 rows of pixels to make a complete "row"; paste 49 times
yG         copy the entire row of the checkerboard
:m$<cr>    move line 2 (the line we're currently on) to the end of the file
           this gives us the "alternating rows" effect
p          we're now on the last line: paste the entire row we copied earlier
2G         hop back to line 2 (beginning of image data)
yG3P       copy the entire image data, paste 3 times

Outputs in NetPPM format (PBM):

output

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ I love that you can complete a graphical output challenge with a text editor. Are there any other examples of PBMs from golfed vim? \$\endgroup\$ – ankh-morpork Feb 4 '16 at 23:12
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @dohaqatar7 I dunno, but I've done TikZ with vim before, so graphics in vim is a thing for sure. \$\endgroup\$ – Doorknob Feb 4 '16 at 23:38
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Wow, I never thought to try <C-p> in vim without having started typing a word... that is really handy! \$\endgroup\$ – Desty Feb 5 '16 at 15:41
16
\$\begingroup\$

CSS, 244 bytes

html{background:#fff}body{width:400px;height:400px;background:linear-gradient(45deg,#000 25%,transparent 25%,transparent 75%,#000 75%)0 0/100px 100px,linear-gradient(45deg,#000 25%,transparent 25%,transparent 75%,#000 75%)50px 50px/100px 100px}

html {
    background: white;
}
body {
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    background:
        linear-gradient(45deg, black 25%, transparent 25%, transparent 75%, black 75%) 0px 0px / 100px 100px,
        linear-gradient(45deg, black 25%, transparent 25%, transparent 75%, black 75%) 50px 50px / 100px 100px
}

Explanation: A 100x100px diagonal linear gradient is created with four stops so that most of the gradient is transparent except for two 50px triangular corners. (See below snippet). Adding a second gradient with a 50x50px offset fills in the missing halves of the squares. Increasing the size of the body then allows the resulting pattern to repeat to fill the entire chessboard.

html {
    background: white;
}
body {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: linear-gradient(45deg, black 25%, transparent 25%, transparent 75%, black 75%) 0px 0px / 100px 100px
}

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Neat solution. It should work as well if you drop the last } . \$\endgroup\$ – insertusernamehere Feb 4 '16 at 19:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you explain what's going on here? \$\endgroup\$ – flawr Feb 4 '16 at 19:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ @flawr I've added a second snippet showing the partial effect, I hope that helps. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Feb 4 '16 at 20:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is perfect. \$\endgroup\$ – Not that Charles Feb 4 '16 at 20:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you really need the html{background:#fff}? By default 99% of browsers set the background to white, afaik \$\endgroup\$ – Downgoat Feb 5 '16 at 1:48
15
\$\begingroup\$

Mathematica, 34 bytes

ArrayPlot@Array[Mod[+##,2]&,{8,8}]

The output is a vector image and is surrounded in a frame.

Instead of correctly positioning 32 rectangles, we can just generate a binary matrix and make ArrayPlot work for us:

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nice! Thanks for posting it. \$\endgroup\$ – A Simmons Feb 4 '16 at 17:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Looking good. Can you please explain me where do you define each square as 50px? Also, is there an online emulator where I can test it? \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 4 '16 at 17:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Bruno The output is a vector graphic, so there is no such thing as pixel sizes (the image has no intrinsic size - it can be scaled to and displayed at any size). That's why I asked. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Feb 4 '16 at 17:49
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ Wait, GenerateChessBoardWithColorsAsParameters[ColorBlack, ColorWhite, 8, 8, 50, 50] doesn't work? ;) \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien Feb 4 '16 at 23:28
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @CᴏɴᴏʀO'Bʀɪᴇɴ It does, but that's 73 bytes. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Feb 5 '16 at 8:16
10
\$\begingroup\$

Mathematica, 81 72 55 bytes

Graphics[Rectangle/@Select[Range@8~Tuples~2,2∣Tr@#&]]

Input/Output

Image is of a previous version's evaluation, but still looks the same.

\$\endgroup\$
8
\$\begingroup\$

Octave, 48 bytes

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​imwrite(kron(mod((t=0:7)+t',2),ones(50)),'.png')

This works exactly the same as my Matlab answer, but there is no spiral in Octave. Instead we use a feature that Matlab does not have: We can use the assignment of t already as an expression, and later use t again in the same expression.

(This is the rescaled version, I do not want to clutter the answers here=)

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ The top left corner should be white, not black. \$\endgroup\$ – Doorknob Feb 4 '16 at 20:28
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ The output should be a checkerboard, the orientation was not specified. \$\endgroup\$ – flawr Feb 4 '16 at 20:57
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, flawr, the output should be a chessboard. A chessboard is always "Queen on her color, white on the right" (meaning the right hand of each player has a white corner square). \$\endgroup\$ – corsiKa Feb 4 '16 at 21:38
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ Then imagine one player sitting to the right, one to the left. Again: this was not specified by the challenge, that is just your interpretation. \$\endgroup\$ – flawr Feb 4 '16 at 21:52
8
\$\begingroup\$

Pure Bash (no external utilities), 133

I saw @Doorknob's comment as a bit of a challenge. Its a bit long, but here goes:

echo \# ImageMagick pixel enumeration:400,400,1,rgb
for((;x=p%400,y=p/400,c=1-(x/50^y/50)&1,p++<160000;));{
echo "$x,$y:($c,$c,$c)"
}

Output is in Imagemagick's .txt format. Note this is pure Bash. Neither Imagemagick nor any other external utilities are spawned to generate this output. However, the output may be redirected to a .txt file and viewed with the ImageMagick display utility:

enter image description here

This image format is nice because not only is it pure text, it is little more than a list of all pixels (x, y and colour value), one per line. It is a fairly simple matter to derive all pixel values arithmetically in one big loop.


Previous answer, 167

echo "\"400 400 2 1\"
\"  c white\"
\"b c black\""
printf -vf %50s
a="$f${f// /b}"
o=("\"$a$a$a$a\"" "\"${f// /b}$a$a$a$f\"")
for i in {0..399};{
echo "${o[i/50%2]}"
}

Output is in the X_PixMap text image file format, which may also be viewed with the ImageMagick display utility.

Note I've taken as much out of the XPM format as I could such that display would still accept it. I was able to take out all the boilerplate with the exception of the " double quotes around each line. No idea what other - if any - utilities will accept this.

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

PowerShell + browser of your choice, 149 143 bytes

The inability to use imports is really tough, as all of the GDI calls (i.e., the stuff PowerShell uses to draw) are buried behind imports in .NET ...

"<table><tr>"+((1..8|%{$a=$_;-join(1..8|%{'<td style="width:50px;height:50px'+("",";background:#000")[($a+$_)%2]+'"></td>'})})-join'</tr><tr>')

Edit - saved six bytes thanks to @NotThatCharles

This uses two for-loops from 1..8 to generate a big-ol' HTML string, similar to the PHP example provided, and output it onto the pipeline. Each time through we calculate whether to append ;background:#000 for the black backgrounds by taking our current position on the board modulo 2.

To use, redirect the output into the file of your choice (e.g., with something like > chessboard.htm) and then launch that in the browser of your choice. For the screenshot below, I used "c.htm" and Firefox.

firefox

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ This one was unespected but I quite like it somehow :) \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 4 '16 at 18:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ white and black can be #fff and #000... but why bother specifying white? \$\endgroup\$ – Not that Charles Feb 4 '16 at 20:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ try (";background:#000","")[($a+$_)%2] instead. \$\endgroup\$ – Not that Charles Feb 4 '16 at 22:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NotthatCharles Durr, had my white and black flip-flopped, so it was only outputting white squares. Corrected for an additional 4 bytes saved. \$\endgroup\$ – AdmBorkBork Feb 5 '16 at 13:27
5
\$\begingroup\$

PHP + CSS + HTML, 136 bytes

Taking the table aproach to a higher level:

<table><?for(;++$i<9;)echo'<tr>',str_repeat(["<td b><td>","<td><td b>"][$i&1],4);?><style>td{width:50px;height:50px}[b]{background:#000}

It generates the following code:

<table><tr><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><tr><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><tr><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><tr><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><tr><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><tr><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><tr><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><tr><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><td b><td><style>td{width:50px;height:50px}[b]{background:#000}

It relies heavily on browsers' kindness and CSS.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Good solution. Tho I had to include php after <? and include $i=0 as the first for parameter to get it working properly, giving a final result of 144 bytes. \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 5 '16 at 10:08
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Bruno If you refer to the warning it gives, warnings are disregarded here. However, there's a trillion ways of disabling them. One of them is to replace ++$i<9 with @++$i<9. Also, for it to work without <?php, one must have the directive short_open_tags=On, which is default on some environments. Read more on stackoverflow.com/a/2185331/2729937 \$\endgroup\$ – Ismael Miguel Feb 5 '16 at 10:26
5
\$\begingroup\$

Jelly, 26 bytes

400R%2ẋ€50FU;$ẋ4;;;1j⁶;”PU

Since Jelly has no support for images built in, we print a PPM image.

Try it online! (smaller board for speed, raw PPM)

Results

screenshot

How it works

400R%2ẋ€50FU;$ẋ4;;;1j⁶;”PU  Main link. No arguments.

400                         Set the left argument to 400.
   R                        Yield [1, ..., 400].
    %2                      Compute the parity of each integer.
      ẋ€50                  Replace each parity by an array of 50 copies of itself.
          F                 Flatten the resulting, nested list.
                            This creates the first rank of the board.
             $              Combine the two atoms to the left:
           U                  Reverse the array of parities.
            ;                 Concatenate the reversed array with the original.
                            This creates the first two ranks of the board.
              ẋ4            Repeat the resulting list four times.
                            This creates all eight ranks of the board.
                ;           Append 400, the link's left argument.
                 ;          Append 400, the link's left argument.
                  ;1        Append 1.
                    j⁶      Join, separating by spaces.
                      ;”P   Append the character 'P'.
                         U  Reverse the resulting list.

Non-competing version (24 bytes)

The newest Jelly interpreter that predates this post didn't vectorize x properly. With the latest version, 2 additional bytes can be saved.

400R%2x50U;$ẋ4;;;1j⁶;”PU

The only difference is that x50 yields a flat list (with every original element repeated 50 times), so F is no longer necessary.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ It looks like you were writing a java answer and fell asleep slightly whilst typing a ;... ;) \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien Feb 4 '16 at 23:31
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @CᴏɴᴏʀO'Bʀɪᴇɴ Java? You must be on Java 10.0, Golfing Edition, cause that doesn't look like any Java I've seen.... \$\endgroup\$ – BalinKingOfMoria Feb 5 '16 at 22:55
5
\$\begingroup\$

MATL, 11 (27) bytes

8:t!+Q2\TYG

This produces the following figure. It doesn't have an intrinsic size; it's automatically scaled depending on the size of the figure window. This seems to be allowed by the challenge.

enter image description here

Explanation

8:      % row vector [1,2,...8]
t!      % duplicate and transpose into column vector
+       % 8x8 matrix with all pairwise additions
Q       % add 1
2\      % modulo 2. Gives 8x8 matrix of zeros and ones
TYG     % draw image

If autoscaling is not allowed:

'imshow'8:t!+Q2\50t3$Y"0#X$

produces the following figure with 50x50-pixel squares

Explanation

enter image description here

'imshow'   % name of Matlab function
8:t!+Q2\   % same as above. Produces 8x8 matrix of zeros and ones
50t3$Y"    % repeat each element 50 times in each dimension
0#X$       % call imshow function with above matrix as input
\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

Pyth, 28 26 bytes

J*4+*50]255*50]0.wm_mxkdJJ

Explanation

J                          - Autoassign J = V
           *50]0           - 50*[0]
    *50]255                - 50*[255]
   +                       - ^^+^
 *4                        - 4*^
                .w         - write_greyscale(V)
                  m      J - [V for d in J]
                   _       - reversed(V) 
                    m   J  - [V for k in J]
                     xkd   - k^d

Python equivalent

J = 4*(50*[255]+50*[0])
write_greyscale([[k^d for k in J][::-1] for d in J])

Try it here (just the colour values)

Output:

Output

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nice job on the byte count but I need a valid output with visible squares :) \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 4 '16 at 18:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Bruno Output added! I installed PIL just for you :O (I hadn't actually tested it before) \$\endgroup\$ – Blue Feb 4 '16 at 18:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ @muddyfish sorry for the trouble and thanks. The board must start with and end with a white square tho :) \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 4 '16 at 18:36
4
\$\begingroup\$

Matlab, 47 (24) bytes

imwrite(kron(mod(spiral(8),2),ones(50)),'.png')

This works exactly the same as my Octave answer, but I was able to use spiral which saved one byte. spiral(n) makes an nxn matrix and fills it spiraling with the first n^2 integers.

If vectorgraphics are allowed, we could do it in 24 bytes:

imshow(mod(spiral(8),2))

(This is the rescaled version, I do not want to clutter the answers here=)

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

FFmpeg, 78 82 100 bytes

Finally got around to cleaning the board.

ffplay -f lavfi color=s=400x400,geq='255*mod(trunc(X/50)+trunc(Y/50)+1,2):128'

enter image description here


Older:

ffmpeg -f lavfi -i "color=tan@0:256x256,format=ya8" -vf "scale=400:-1:alphablend=checkerboard" .jpg

Will exit with error, but after producing image below.

enter image description here

(board's collected some dust)

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

CJam, 27 bytes

"P1"400__,2f%50e*_W%+4*~]S*

Try it online! (smaller board for speed, raw PPM)

Results

screenshot

How it works

"P1"                        e# Push that string.
    400__                   e# Push three copies of 400.
         ,                  e# Turn the last one into [0 ... 399].
          2f%               e# Compute the parity of each integer.
             50e*           e# Repeat each parity 50 times.
                            e# This creates the first rank of the board.
                 _W%        e# Create a reversed copy of the resulting array.
                    +       e# Concatenate the original with the reversed array.
                            e# This creates the first two ranks of the board.
                     4*     e# Repeat the resulting array four times.
                            e# This creates all eight ranks of the board.
                       ~    e# Dump all of its items (the pixels) on the stack.
                        ]   e# Wrap the entire stack in an array.
                         S* e# Join that array, separating them by spaces.
\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

HTML with utf-8 - 66b

<div style="font:100 50px/48px serif">▚▚▚▚<br>▚▚▚▚<br>▚▚▚▚<br>▚▚▚▚

▚ is short-direct utf for entity &# 9626 ;

Unicode Character 'QUADRANT UPPER LEFT AND LOWER RIGHT' (U+259A)

silly me, was looking for a 1 utf-8 char solution -would have been... 1b!

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Seems like fontsize is wrong. \$\endgroup\$ – Qwertiy Feb 6 '16 at 20:20
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ You should use instead so that the top-left square is white like on a standard chessboard. Also, use <pre> instead of <div> so that you can use newlines instead of <br>. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Jul 17 '16 at 10:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ Your bytecount appears to be wrong, it should be 98 bytes, as counts for 3 bytes using UTF-8 encoding. In the future, you can use this to check your UTF-8 Byte Count \$\endgroup\$ – Taylor Scott Oct 11 '17 at 17:30
2
\$\begingroup\$

PHP, 166 158 155 bytes

Works in PHP 7.0.2 (short-tags enabled) and Chrome 48.0.2564.97 m

<table><tr><? while(++$i<=8){while(++$j<=8){echo"<td style=background-color:".($i%2==0?($j%2==1?0:""):($j%2==0?0:"")).";padding:9></td>";}echo"<tr>";$j=0;}
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can use the property bgcolor=0 to generate the black background. That should shave off a ton of bytes! And instead of $v%2==0, use $v&1, which should shave a few bytes. \$\endgroup\$ – Ismael Miguel Feb 6 '16 at 12:19
2
\$\begingroup\$

PHP >=5.4, 175 159 149 116 Bytes

<table><tr><? for(;@++$i<65;)echo'<td width=50 height=50 ',$i+@$m&1?:'bgcolor=0','>',$i%8<1?'<tr '.($m=@!$m).'>':'';

<table><tr><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><tr 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><tr ><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><tr 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><tr ><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><tr 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><tr ><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><tr 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><td width=50 height=50 bgcolor=0><td width=50 height=50 1><tr >

Notes

  • Shaved 16 bytes - Thanks @insertusernamehere
  • Shaved 10 bytes - Thanks @msh210
  • Shaved 30 bytes - Thanks @Ismael Miguel
\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Probably this can be golfed even more, but here you go (152 bytes): <table><tr><?php for(;++$i<65;){echo'<td style="width:50px;height:50px;background:#'.(($i+$m)%2?'000':'').'"></td>';if($i%8<1){echo"</tr><tr>";$m=!$m;}} \$\endgroup\$ – insertusernamehere Feb 4 '16 at 20:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ While i didn't remove the initial assignments(Works, personal quirk won't let me do it), Thank for this \$\endgroup\$ – Shaun H Feb 4 '16 at 21:20
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ According to even the strict version of HTML 4, you can skip the end tag for TR. \$\endgroup\$ – msh210 Feb 5 '16 at 0:07
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Replace ++$i<65 with @++$i<65, since you are worried about the warnings. This means that you can reduce $m=$i=0 to just $m=0, saving you 2 bytes. Instead of echo 'a'.'b'.'c';, you can do echo 'a','b','c';. This means that your echo can be echo'<td style="width:50px;height:50px;background:#',($i+$m)%2?'':'000','">'; saving you more 2 bytes. Also, HTML attributes don't require quotes. Remove them and sabe 2 bytes. Also, there's a much shorter bgcolor attribute, that reduces more bytes! You can use a print() in the for to save even more bytes! \$\endgroup\$ – Ismael Miguel Feb 6 '16 at 11:53
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ To save even more, I've replaced ($i+$m)%2 with $i+@$m&1, which allowed me to remove that $m=0. Ahead, I've been able to remove your if, and replaced it with a trenary operation. To save even more, I've removed your style and added the properties width and height. To get even more into the hacky side, I've figured that Chrome 48.0.2564.103 m uses black if the background color is 0, using the property bgcolor. That allowed me to ever reduce more! More reductions is better! \$\endgroup\$ – Ismael Miguel Feb 6 '16 at 12:14
1
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript, 150

This can definitely be golfed. It creates HTML.

for(i=0;i<8;)console.log(`<b style=margin-${['lef','righ'][i++%2]}t:50;width:50;height:50;display:inline-block;background:#000></b>`.repeat(4)+'<br>')
\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Huh, I never knew about template strings in JavaScript. Cool. \$\endgroup\$ – Cheezey Feb 5 '16 at 1:04
1
\$\begingroup\$

iKe, 24 bytes

,(;cga;t=\:t:2!-20!!160)

board

The core of the technique is to generate a list of x coordinates, divmod them and then take an equality cross-product to generate an appropriate bitmap. Using smaller examples for illustrative purposes:

  !8
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

  -2!!8
0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3

  2!-2!!8
0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1

  t=\:t:2!-2!!8
(1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0
 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0
 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0
 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0
 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1)

try it here. Technically iKe works on a logical 160x160 pixel canvas, but in full-screen mode (the default when following a saved link) this is upscaled by 3x. I think this is still following the spirit of the question, as the program could assemble a much larger bitmap with the same character count; it just comes down to an arbitrary display limitation.

Update:

iKe isn't primarily designed for golf, but livecoding still benefits from brevity and sane defaults. As a result of tinkering with this problem, I've decided to permit it to use a default palette if none is provided. This particular solution could now be expressed with:

,(;;t=\:t:2!-20!!160)

Saving (an ineligible) 3 bytes.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Ruby with Shoes, 97 characters

Shoes.app(width:400){64.times{|i|stack(width:50,height:50){background [white,black][(i/8+i)%2]}}}

Sample output:

Chessboard drawn by Ruby with Shoes

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Should start and end with white. Otherwise good job :) \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 5 '16 at 14:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oops. Thanks @Bruno. Fixed. \$\endgroup\$ – manatwork Feb 5 '16 at 16:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Great, upvoted :) \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 5 '16 at 16:49
1
\$\begingroup\$

Lua + LÖVE, 138 113 112 106 characters

function love.draw()for i=0,31 do
love.graphics.rectangle("fill",i%8*50,(i-i%8)/8*100+i%2*50,50,50)end
end

Sample output:

Chessboard drawn by Lua + LÖVE

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Grr! Lua 5.3 has // integer division operator, but apparently there is still no LÖVE built with a LuaJIT featuring it. ☹ \$\endgroup\$ – manatwork Feb 5 '16 at 16:53
1
\$\begingroup\$

GIMP, 539 bytes

gimp -i -b '(let* ((i (car (gimp-image-new 400 400 1))) (d (car (gimp-layer-new i 400 400 2 "b" 100 0)))) (gimp-image-insert-layer i d 0 -1) (define (t x y) (gimp-selection-translate i x y)) (define (x) (t 100 0)) (define (X) (t -100 0)) (define (y) (t 50 50)) (define (Y) (t -50 50)) (define (f) (gimp-edit-fill d 1)) (define (r) (f) (x) (f) (x) (f) (x) (f) (y)) (define (R) (f) (X) (f) (X) (f) (X) (f) (Y)) (gimp-image-select-rectangle i 2 0 0 50 50) (r) (R) (r) (R) (r) (R) (r) (R) (gimp-file-save 1 i d "c.png" "c.png") (gimp-quit 0))'

Ungolfed Scheme script-fu:

(let* ((i (car (gimp-image-new 400 400 GRAY)))
       (d (car (gimp-layer-new i 400 400 GRAY-IMAGE "b" 100 NORMAL-MODE))))

  (gimp-image-insert-layer i d 0 -1)
  (define (t x y) (gimp-selection-translate i x y))
  (define (x) (t 100 0))
  (define (X) (t -100 0))
  (define (y) (t 50 50))
  (define (Y) (t -50 50))
  (define (f) (gimp-edit-fill d BACKGROUND-FILL))
  (define (r) (f) (x) (f) (x) (f) (x) (f) (y))
  (define (R) (f) (X) (f) (X) (f) (X) (f) (Y))

  (gimp-image-select-rectangle i CHANNEL-OP-REPLACE 0 0 50 50)
  (r) (R) (r) (R) (r) (R) (r) (R)
  (gimp-file-save RUN-NONINTERACTIVE i d "c.png" "c.png")
  (gimp-quit 0))

In batch mode, create a blank image, create a 50x50 rectangular selection, fill it, and then repeatedly move it around the image, filling in squares. Then save to c.png and exit.

Output:

chessboard png

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

J, 3331 bytes

I used a trick with binary.

   load'viewmat'
   viewmat 8 8$#:43605

... because 43605 in binary is 1010101001010101 (we use #: primitive to get it). Primitive $ shapes this array of binary digits into a matrix specified with the dimensions 8 8. And viewmat is just a system library.
enter image description here
The window is fully resizable.

Thanks to @FrownyFrog for shortening it to:

   load'viewmat'
   viewmat#:8$170 85
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ viewmat 8$#:170 85 is 1 byte shorter \$\endgroup\$ – FrownyFrog Oct 9 '17 at 10:04
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ viewmat#:8$170 85 \$\endgroup\$ – FrownyFrog Oct 9 '17 at 10:23
1
\$\begingroup\$

Excel VBA, 82 Bytes

Anonymous VBE immediate window function that takes no input and outputs a checkerboard to the range A1:H8 on the ActiveSheet object

Cells.RowHeight=48:[B1:B8,D1:D8,F1:F8,H1:H8].Interior.Color=0:[A2,A4,A6,A8].Delete

This function works by first creating 4 black columns in the range B1:B8,D1:D8,F1:F8,H1:H8 and then offsetting the coloring in rows 2,4,6 and 8 to the left by one cell.

Sample Output

CheckerBoard

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Perl 5 - 80

Generates a .PBM file:

print 'P1'.' 400'x2 .$".(((0 x50 .1 x50)x4 .$")x50 .((1 x50 .0 x50)x4 .$")x50)x4
\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

PowerShell + GDI, 346 bytes

Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Windows.Forms
Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Drawing
$f=New-Object Windows.Forms.Form
$f.width=$f.height=450
$g=$f.CreateGraphics()
$f.add_paint({0..7|%{$y=$_;0..7|%{$g.FillRectangle((New-Object Drawing.SolidBrush ("white","black")[($_+$y)%2]),(new-object Drawing.Rectangle ($_*50),($y*50),50,50))}}})
$f.showDialog()

(newlines count same as semicolon, so newlines for readability)

As opposed to my other answer, this one uses the .NET assemblies to call GDI+ function calls. Interestingly, it's about twice the length.

The first two lines load the System.Windows.Forms and System.Drawing assemblies. The first is used for the literal window and the canvas thereon, the second is used for the drawing object (in this code, a brush) that create the graphics on the canvas.

We then create our form $f with the next line, and set its width and height to be 450. Note that this isn't 50*8, since these numbers correspond to the border-to-border edge of the forms window, including titlebar, the close button, etc.

The next line creates our canvas $g by calling the empty constructor. This defaults to the upper-left of the non-system area of the form being equal to 0,0 and increasing to the right and downward, perfect for our needs.

The next line is the actual call that draws the graphics, with $f.add_paint({...}). We construct the graphics calls by double-for looping from 0..7 and carrying a helper variable $y through each outer loop. Each inner loop, we tell our canvas to .FillRectangle(...,...) to draw our squares. The first parameter constructs a new SolidBrush with a color based on where we're at on the board. Other options here could be a hatch, a gradient, etc. The second parameter is a new Rectangle object starting at the specified x $_*50 and $y*50 coordinates and extending for 50 in each direction. Remember that 0,0 is the top-left.

The final line just displays the output with .showDialog(). PowerShell Forms

Note that since we're creating a form object, and PowerShell is all about the pipeline, closing the pop-up form will pass along a System.Enum.DialogResult object of Cancel, since that's technically what the user did. Since we're not capturing or otherwise doing anything with that result, the word Cancel will be displayed to STDOUT when the program concludes, as it was left on the pipeline.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

SELECT., 8844 8278 bytes

(9,9,50)EXP.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LOG.LEFT.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOOP.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.CONJ.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LEFT.EXP.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOOP.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LEFT.END.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOOP.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.END.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOOP.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.SELECT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.PRINT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.LEFT.END.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.SELECT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOOP.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.END.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.EXP.LEFT.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.RIGHT.EXP.LEFT.SELECT.RIGHT.LOG.RIGHT.SELECT.LEFT.END.

Sure it's long, but the first two versions I generated for this task were twice as long.

Output:

screenshot

How it Works:

Here's the program used to generate it:

init(9,9,50)
makenum(8)
square()
dec()
loop("main",computei=True)
go(1)
makenum(8)
go(1)
copyfrom(-2)
intdiv(-1)
add(-5)           # n%8 blah blah blah blah n//8 k^(n//8) k^(n%8) (n//8+n%8)
go(1)
makeneg1()
exptarget(-1)
go(1)
ifnonpositive("drawtest")
go(1)
makenum(-4,-4)    # n%8 blah blah blah blah n//8 k^(n//8) k^(n%8) n//8+n%8 (-1)^(n//8+n%8) 4 1/2 I k^(-4I) -1 (-4-4I)
go(1)
multiply(-4,-11)   # n%8 blah blah blah blah n//8 k^(n//8) k^(n%8) n//8+n%8 (-1)^(n//8+n%8) 4 1/2 I k^(-4I) -1 -4-4I (nI//8)
add(-16)          # n%8 blah blah blah blah n//8 k^(n//8) k^(n%8) n//8+n%8 (-1)^(n//8+n%8) 4 1/2 I k^(-4I) -1 -4-4I nI//8 k^(nI//8) k^(n%8) (n%8+nI//8)
add(-4)           # n%8 blah blah blah blah n//8 (-1)^(n%8) 4 1/2 I k^(-4I) -1 -4-4I nI//8 k^(nI//8) k^(n%8) n%8+nI//8 k^(n%8+nI//8) k^(-4-4I) ((n%8-4)+I(n//8-4))
output()
endif("drawtest")
go(1)
endloop("main")
writetofile("chessboard4")

In other words, loop n from 0 to 63, drawing a square at (n%8-4) + (n//8-4)i if (-1)^(n//8 + n%8) is not positive.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thats not really golf is it :p? \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Feb 5 '16 at 15:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ I cannot be certain it's the shortest program that does the task, no. However, I am fairly certain that the difference between this and the best possible solution in this language is insignificant compared to the total length of the program. I have one more idea in mind that may or may not be shorter. I'll try it out sometime soon. \$\endgroup\$ – quintopia Feb 5 '16 at 17:38
0
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript (ES6), 147

for(i=0;++i<72;)document.write(`<div style="${i%9?'':(++i,'clear:both;')}float:left;width:50px;height:50px;background:#${i&1?'fff':'000'}"></div>`)

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Python, 57 bytes

c=50*"1"+50*"0"
print"P1 400 400 "+4*(200*c+200*c[::-1])

c is a line of 50 white and 50 black pixels, 200*c is a row with a white in the front, 200*c[::-1] the reverse.

Output as PPM, usage:

python golf_chess.py > chess.ppm
\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.