233
\$\begingroup\$

Using your language of choice, golf a quine.

A quine is a non-empty computer program which takes no input and produces a copy of its own source code as its only output.

No cheating -- that means that you can't just read the source file and print it. Also, in many languages, an empty file is also a quine: that isn't considered a legit quine either.

No error quines -- there is already a separate challenge for error quines.

Points for:

  • Smallest code (in bytes)
  • Most obfuscated/obscure solution
  • Using esoteric/obscure languages
  • Successfully using languages that are difficult to golf in

The following Stack Snippet can be used to get a quick view of the current score in each language, and thus to know which languages have existing answers and what sort of target you have to beat:

var QUESTION_ID=69;
var OVERRIDE_USER=98;

var ANSWER_FILTER="!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe";var COMMENT_FILTER="!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk";var answers=[],answers_hash,answer_ids,answer_page=1,more_answers=!0,comment_page;function answersUrl(index){return"https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/"+QUESTION_ID+"/answers?page="+index+"&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter="+ANSWER_FILTER}
function commentUrl(index,answers){return"https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/"+answers.join(';')+"/comments?page="+index+"&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter="+COMMENT_FILTER}
function getAnswers(){jQuery.ajax({url:answersUrl(answer_page++),method:"get",dataType:"jsonp",crossDomain:!0,success:function(data){answers.push.apply(answers,data.items);answers_hash=[];answer_ids=[];data.items.forEach(function(a){a.comments=[];var id=+a.share_link.match(/\d+/);answer_ids.push(id);answers_hash[id]=a});if(!data.has_more)more_answers=!1;comment_page=1;getComments()}})}
function getComments(){jQuery.ajax({url:commentUrl(comment_page++,answer_ids),method:"get",dataType:"jsonp",crossDomain:!0,success:function(data){data.items.forEach(function(c){if(c.owner.user_id===OVERRIDE_USER)
answers_hash[c.post_id].comments.push(c)});if(data.has_more)getComments();else if(more_answers)getAnswers();else process()}})}
getAnswers();var SCORE_REG=(function(){var headerTag=String.raw `h\d`
var score=String.raw `\-?\d+\.?\d*`
var normalText=String.raw `[^\n<>]*`
var strikethrough=String.raw `<s>${normalText}</s>|<strike>${normalText}</strike>|<del>${normalText}</del>`
var noDigitText=String.raw `[^\n\d<>]*`
var htmlTag=String.raw `<[^\n<>]+>`
return new RegExp(String.raw `<${headerTag}>`+String.raw `\s*([^\n,]*[^\s,]),.*?`+String.raw `(${score})`+String.raw `(?=`+String.raw `${noDigitText}`+String.raw `(?:(?:${strikethrough}|${htmlTag})${noDigitText})*`+String.raw `</${headerTag}>`+String.raw `)`)})();var OVERRIDE_REG=/^Override\s*header:\s*/i;function getAuthorName(a){return a.owner.display_name}
function process(){var valid=[];answers.forEach(function(a){var body=a.body;a.comments.forEach(function(c){if(OVERRIDE_REG.test(c.body))
body='<h1>'+c.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG,'')+'</h1>'});var match=body.match(SCORE_REG);if(match)
valid.push({user:getAuthorName(a),size:+match[2],language:match[1],link:a.share_link,})});valid.sort(function(a,b){var aB=a.size,bB=b.size;return aB-bB});var languages={};var place=1;var lastSize=null;var lastPlace=1;valid.forEach(function(a){if(a.size!=lastSize)
lastPlace=place;lastSize=a.size;++place;var answer=jQuery("#answer-template").html();answer=answer.replace("{{PLACE}}",lastPlace+".").replace("{{NAME}}",a.user).replace("{{LANGUAGE}}",a.language).replace("{{SIZE}}",a.size).replace("{{LINK}}",a.link);answer=jQuery(answer);jQuery("#answers").append(answer);var lang=a.language;lang=jQuery('<i>'+a.language+'</i>').text().toLowerCase();languages[lang]=languages[lang]||{lang:a.language,user:a.user,size:a.size,link:a.link,uniq:lang}});var langs=[];for(var lang in languages)
if(languages.hasOwnProperty(lang))
langs.push(languages[lang]);langs.sort(function(a,b){if(a.uniq>b.uniq)return 1;if(a.uniq<b.uniq)return-1;return 0});for(var i=0;i<langs.length;++i)
{var language=jQuery("#language-template").html();var lang=langs[i];language=language.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}",lang.lang).replace("{{NAME}}",lang.user).replace("{{SIZE}}",lang.size).replace("{{LINK}}",lang.link);language=jQuery(language);jQuery("#languages").append(language)}}
body{text-align:left!important}#answer-list{padding:10px;float:left}#language-list{padding:10px;float:left}table thead{font-weight:700}table td{padding:5px}
 <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/codegolf/primary.css?v=f52df912b654"> <div id="language-list"> <h2>Winners by Language</h2> <table class="language-list"> <thead> <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr></thead> <tbody id="languages"> </tbody> </table> </div><div id="answer-list"> <h2>Leaderboard</h2> <table class="answer-list"> <thead> <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr></thead> <tbody id="answers"> </tbody> </table> </div><table style="display: none"> <tbody id="answer-template"> <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">{{SIZE}}</a></td></tr></tbody> </table> <table style="display: none"> <tbody id="language-template"> <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">{{SIZE}}</a></td></tr></tbody> </table> 

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ Do you not mean, "Golf you a quine for greater good!"? \$\endgroup\$ May 3, 2011 at 2:49
  • 62
    \$\begingroup\$ @muntoo it's a play on "Learn you a Haskell for Great Good". \$\endgroup\$ May 3, 2011 at 2:52
  • 18
    \$\begingroup\$ Did anybody notice that this is question 69? \$\endgroup\$
    – aidan0626
    Oct 24, 2020 at 22:47

415 Answers 415

1
3 4
5
6 7
14
6
\$\begingroup\$

Bash + coreutils, 18 bytes

sed p<<a
sed p<<a

It requires a trailing newline and generates a warning.

Posted the Zsh version in a separate answer to fix the leaderboard.

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • \$\begingroup\$ Interesting use of the here-document, but one has to end the text stream manually with Ctrl+D to make the script run, hence the warning. To have it run automatically, an extra line with just a on it is required, but that would break the quine. \$\endgroup\$
    – seshoumara
    Sep 7, 2016 at 8:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ @seshoumara Just put it in a script file and use bash filename to run. \$\endgroup\$
    – jimmy23013
    Sep 7, 2016 at 9:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ Aah, you give an EOF this way, nice. Maybe add that to description. I run it with bash script 2> /dev/null to get rid of STDERR. \$\endgroup\$
    – seshoumara
    Sep 7, 2016 at 9:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ In dash and zsh, you don't need the trailing newline and it won't generate a warning. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dennis
    Sep 8, 2016 at 15:49
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @seshoumara Answers on this site should be functions or complete programs, and not code snippets in a REPL, by default. \$\endgroup\$
    – jimmy23013
    Sep 8, 2016 at 21:12
6
\$\begingroup\$

Underload, 10 Bytes

(:aSS):aSS

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

Julia 1.0, 32 bytes

".|>[show,print]".|>[show,print]

Try it online!

And here is a 35 byte quine that works in version 0.4 (And beats the previous answer):

x = "print(@show x)"
print(@show x)

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ That, sir, is amazing! \$\endgroup\$
    – primo
    Jan 6, 2019 at 15:52
6
\$\begingroup\$

Rust, 72 66 bytes

fn main(){print!("{}{0:?})}}","fn main(){print!(\"{}{0:?})}}\",")}

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

1+, 5424 4978 4808 4112 3962 3748 bytes

11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+111+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1+11+11+1+1+1+1+1+1+(|11+1<)\(1|1""+""*++"*;)($|1+11#(1)1""+""*+""*++;1#1+"//"\^\<11+*#()*+\)(%|()#(1)($)"1+1<#)\(&|()#11+"*"*"++;\"1+1<#)

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Congratulations! You beat me to the punch. Nice work!! \$\endgroup\$
    – null
    Oct 6, 2019 at 1:42
6
\$\begingroup\$

Pyth, 9 8 bytes

p+N
"p+N

Saved one more byte by using the newline operator

(Also I made this ages ago but forgot to edit this so yeah)

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
6
+100
\$\begingroup\$

Whispers v2, 38 bytes

> "print('> %r\\n>> ⍎1'%a)"
>> ⍎1

Try it online!

Abuses the fact that there's an eval as Python command (), which I can use to turn it into an arbitrary Python program. But of course, as a less cheaty feeling quine, there's:

Whispers v2, 270 bytes

> [62, 62, 32, 34, 49, 34, 10, 62, 32, 34, 62, 32, 34, 10, 62, 62, 32, 51, 43, 50, 10, 62, 62, 32, 69, 97, 99, 104, 32, 54, 32, 49, 10, 62, 62, 32, 39, 82, 10, 62, 62, 32, 79, 117, 116, 112, 117, 116, 32, 52, 32, 53]
>> "1"
> "> "
>> 3+2
>> Each 6 1
>> 'R
>> Output 4 5

Try it online!

Which encodes the ordinal values of the rest of the program on the first line, then prints the list then the list converted to characters.

Turns out I missed another way to make a slightly cheaty quine. In Whispers, the modulo command directly calls Python's %, which is overloaded with string formatting. This means you can forgo the eval command and do:

Whispers v2, 50 bytes

> '> %r\n>> 1%%1\n>> Output 2'
>> 1%1
>> Output 2

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

beeswax, 17 13 bytes

According to the discussion on Does using SMBF count as a cheating quine? the original version at the bottom would count as a cheating quine, so I am wondering if a small change would make this a “proper” quine. The new version is 4 bytes smaller and does not modify its own source code:

`_4~++~+.}1fJ

Explanation:

                lstack     STDOUT

 _             α[0,0,0]•                 create bees α,β, moving right and left
               β[0,0,0]•

` 4            α[0,0,4]•                 push 4 on top of α lstack, switch β to print mode
β α            β[0,0,0]•                 switch β to character output mode

   ~           α[0,4,0]•                 flip α lstack top and 2nd
    +          α[0,4,4]•                 lstack top = top+2nd
     +         α[0,4,8]•                 lstack top = top+2nd
      ~        α[0,8,4]•                 flip lstack top and 2nd
       +       α[0,8,12]•                lstack top = top+2nd
        .      α[0,8,96]•                lstack top = top*2nd
         }     α[0,8,96]•    ` ASCII(96) output char(lstack top) to STDOUT
          1    α[0,8,1]•                 lstack top = 1
           F   α[1,1,1]•                 all lstack = top
            J  α[1,1,1]•                 jump to (x,y) = (lstack top, lstack 2nd)
`_4~++~+.}1FJ  α[1,1,1]•   _4~++~+.}1FJ  output characters to STDOUT

This version should qualify as proper quine if the Befunge-93 program on Thompson’s Quine Page is listed as proper quine. The Befunge quine below does nothing else than read itself character by character, one character during each implicit loop, and output the character to STDOUT.

:0g,:93+`#@_1+

Correct me if I’m wrong.


Old (cheating?) version.

beeswax is a new 2D esolang on a hexagonal grid. It is inspired by bees, honeycombs and by the Hive board game (which uses hexagonal gaming pieces). beeswax programs are able to modify their own code. Thanks to this ability it is not too hard to create a quine. But the program does not read its own source code, as my explanation shows.

The first beeswax quine in existence:

_4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J

Or equivalently:

*4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J

IPs are called bees, the program area is called honeycomb. Every bee owns a local stack called lstack, carrying 3 unsigned 64 bit integer values.

Explanation:

                                             lstack
                                     • marks top of stack

* or _  create bee(same result in this situation)[0,0,0]•
 4      1st lstack value=4                       [0,0,4]•
  ~        flip 1st/2nd lstack values            [0,4,0]•
   ++      1st=1st+2nd, twice                    [0,4,8]•
     ~                                           [0,8,4]•
      +                                          [0,8,12]•
       .         1st=1st*2nd                     [0,8,96]•
        @  flip 1st/3rd lstack values            [96,8,0]• 
         1     1st=1                             [96,8,1]•
          ~                                      [96,1,8]•
           0   1st=0                             [96,1,0]•
            @                                    [0,1,96]•
             D drop 1st at row=2nd,col.=3rd val. [0,1,96]•
       This drops ASCII(96)= ` beyond the left border.

Dropping a value at a coordinate outside the program—in this case at column 0—grows the honeycomb by 1 column to the left. The coordinate system gets reset, so this column becomes the new column 1. So, growing the honeycomb in ‘negative’ direction is only possible in steps of 1. The grown honeycomb is always a rectangle encompassing all code.

This modifies the program to:

`*4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J

continuing...

               @                                  [96,1,0]•
                1                                 [96,1,1]•
                 J jump to row=1st,column=2nd val.[96,1,1]•
`                  switch to character output mode.
 *4~++~+.@1~0@D@1J    the following characters are printed to STDOUT.

GitHub repository of the Julia package of the beeswax interpreter.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can generate 96 using 5~3(. Try it online! (TIO still has the bug with the endof vs lastindex) \$\endgroup\$
    – Jo King
    Sep 26, 2020 at 23:22
6
\$\begingroup\$

convey, 54 bytes

'Z  u   u%+}12  !*]+|   |0]!&[&&Z'[
v
v&,~23
"+^,}
}1^"'\''[

Try it online!

As a bonus, I even managed to avoid using any unprintable characters, though there are a few tabs in there.

Explanation

Here's an image of how the code is interpreted (the gif version would take too long, since it takes approximately 23*26=598 steps):

quine

There are two starting conveyor belts here, indicated by the [s on the top and bottom lines. The one on the top line feeds the data string to the rest of the program, while the other one prints the leading ' for the string and adds the other quote to the buffered output.

The top row is fed through a duplicator ("), one side of which is just pushed to output, while the other one has each character incremented by one (+1) to be transformed into the rest of the program before entering a queue (&), which already contains a '. Each character in this queue is delayed by 23 steps (~23), so that it only starts printing after the initial data string has finished being printed.

\$\endgroup\$
6
+100
\$\begingroup\$

Javastack, 64 bytes

"34 char swap add 2 repeat print"34 char swap add 2 repeat print

No TIO yet, watch this space!

Javastack aims to combine the verbosity of Java with the stack-based paradigm to create a truly horrible programming experience. I'm planning to make up for the verbosity with a truly immense library of functions, but it's all a work in progress.

Javastack doesn't have any way to get the character " aside from 34 char, so that's what we start with. We prepend it to the string currently on the stack (which is part of the code) with swap add, double it with 2 repeat, and print it, resulting in the source code.

-12 thanks to Aaron Miller - outgolfing me in my own language!

\$\endgroup\$
7
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ Doesn't look too verbose compared to Forth or Factor :P \$\endgroup\$
    – Bubbler
    Aug 5, 2021 at 9:06
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Not that Java if everything doesn't have to be inside a class, you don't have to deal with any qualified names, and you don't have to declare the types of... stack positions? I'm going mad even trying to think about that last point \$\endgroup\$ Aug 5, 2021 at 9:08
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @UnrelatedString Ooh, good idea! \$\endgroup\$
    – emanresu A
    Aug 5, 2021 at 9:09
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ "I'm planning to make up for the verbosity with a truly immense library of functions." Sounds more like Factor than Java to me :P \$\endgroup\$
    – user
    Aug 5, 2021 at 15:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can get rid of the space before each 34 char for 74 bytes: "34 char swap add duplicate add print"34 char swap add duplicate add print \$\endgroup\$ Aug 5, 2021 at 16:01
6
\$\begingroup\$

!@#$%^&*()_+, 1128 1116 1069 960 877 844 540 477 407 383 33 bytes

Edit: Woah... -304 B with space

Edit 2: Bruh.

Edit 3: Thanks Jo King for the idea! I outgolfed ya!

A stack-based language(The first on TIO's list!)

It's a big pile of unprintables though

N0N  (!&+$*)^(!&@^)!

(Spaces are NUL bytes)

Try it online!

Here's the code, but in Control Pictures form:

␙N0␖␑␘N␙␚␔␛␀␖␑␘␀␐(!&␐+$*)^(!&@^)!

Explanation

␙N0␖␑␘N␙␚␔␛␀␖␑␘␀␐                 Data
                 (!&␐+$*)         Push the stack, reversed and +16 back on top
                         ^(!&@^)! Print everything reversed, including the length (Hence the final `!`)

It does error on overflow though...

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • \$\begingroup\$ Will it get to BF length? I wonder... \$\endgroup\$
    – SuperPizz
    Apr 18 at 11:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Almost there... \$\endgroup\$
    – SuperPizz
    Apr 18 at 12:02
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ just as a note, i have posted a quine in this language before, though don't let that stop you improving this further \$\endgroup\$
    – Jo King
    Apr 18 at 13:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ SO messed up the unprintables \$\endgroup\$
    – SuperPizz
    Apr 18 at 18:34
5
\$\begingroup\$

C++ (350)

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
int main(){std::ofstream f;f.open("f.cpp");
#define B(x)x;f<<("B(" #x ")");
#define A(x)f<<("A(" #x ")");x;
B(f<<("#include<iostream>\n#include<fstream>\nint main(){std::ofstream f;f.open(\"f.cpp\");\n#define B(x)x;f<<(\"B(\" #x \")\");\n#define A(x)f<<(\"A(\" #x \")\");x;\n"))A(f<<("f.close();}\n"))f.close();}

Modified version of this.

Makes use of the C++ preprocessor.

\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

CSS, 47 bytes

<style>:before,*{display:block;content:'<style>

Paste into a blank HTML page to avoid conflict with other tags.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • \$\begingroup\$ Wouldn't this technically be HTML with embedded CSS in it? Also, what browser did this successfully quine in, because when I test this with an empty HTML file, it displays :before,*{display:block;content:'<style> on the window. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 16, 2017 at 5:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ This doesn't work as HTML has implicit html, head and body tags. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 20, 2018 at 16:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @KonradBorowski But technically HTML still works if you leave out the tags on modern browsers. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 2 at 18:20
5
\$\begingroup\$

Arcyóu, 1 byte

Q

The interpreter evaluates undefined symbols as strings, and the result of the last expression evaluated is automatically printed at the end of the program. What's interesting is that any undefined identifier can be used; I_am_a_quine! is also a quine.

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2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ This does not satisfy our rules for proper quines as the Q only encodes itself (as does any character in I_am_a_quine!). \$\endgroup\$ May 23, 2017 at 15:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Agreed @MartinEnder, but the challenge does not specify proper quines. \$\endgroup\$
    – jqblz
    Jun 2, 2017 at 21:30
5
\$\begingroup\$

Brachylog (2), 26 bytes, language postdates challenge

"ạ~bAh34∧A~ạj"ạ~bAh34∧A~ạj

Try it online!

A function that returns its own source code. (This can be made into a 28-byte full program by adding w after each occurrence of j.)

Explanation

"ạ~bAh34∧A~ạj"ạ~bAh34∧A~ạj
"ạ~bAh34∧A~ạj"               String literal
              ạ              Convert to list of character codes
               ~b            Prepend an element
                  h34          so that the first element is 34
                 A   ∧A        but work with the entire list
                       ~ạ    Convert to string
                         j   Concatenate the string to itself
\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

Taxi, 1144 1034 970 bytes

"is waiting at Writer's Depot.34 is waiting at Starchild Numerology.Go to Starchild Numerology:w 1 r 3 l 2 l 3 l 2 r.Pickup a passenger going to Charboil Grill.Go to Charboil Grill:e 1 l.Pickup a passenger going to KonKat's.Go to Writer's Depot:w 1 r.Pickup a passenger going to KonKat's.Go to KonKat's:n 3 r 2 r.Pickup a passenger going to Cyclone.Go to Cyclone:n 1 l 2 l.Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.Go to Post Office:s 1 l 2 r 1 l."is waiting at Writer's Depot.34 is waiting at Starchild Numerology.Go to Starchild Numerology:w 1 r 3 l 2 l 3 l 2 r.Pickup a passenger going to Charboil Grill.Go to Charboil Grill:e 1 l.Pickup a passenger going to KonKat's.Go to Writer's Depot:w 1 r.Pickup a passenger going to KonKat's.Go to KonKat's:n 3 r 2 r.Pickup a passenger going to Cyclone.Go to Cyclone:n 1 l 2 l.Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.Go to Post Office:s 1 l 2 r 1 l.

Please ignore the output to stderr. Who needs a job if you can quine anyway?

Try it online!

How does this work?

Short answer

This quine starts with a string. If you replace the content of that string by <string>, the code looks like "<string>"<string>, which is "<string> twice. Because the string doesn't contain the double quote, we first get the double quote via its character code, concatenate it with the string, then copy the string and concatenate it with itself. Finally, we print the string.

Long answer

under construction

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5
\$\begingroup\$

tinylisp, 88 bytes

The byte count includes a trailing newline.

((q (g (c (c (q q) g) (c (c (q q) g) ())))) (q (g (c (c (q q) g) (c (c (q q) g) ())))))

Try it online!

There are no strings in tinylisp, but a nontrivial quine is still possible because code is lists and lists are code. The above code is a list which, when evaluated, returns (and therefore prints) itself.

The idea is to pass the list (g (c (c (q q) g) (c (c (q q) g) ()))) to a function which will wrap it in a list, tack a q on the front, and then wrap two copies of that in a list. Which is exactly what the function (q (g (c (c (q q) g) (c (c (q q) g) ())))) does. In-depth explanation available on request, but I wanted to post this before turning in for the night.

\$\endgroup\$
0
5
\$\begingroup\$

Japt, 9 bytes

I've fantasized about a 9-byte Japt quine for years, and now it's finally snapped into place :-D

9îQi"9îQi

Test it online!

Explanation

    "9îQi    Start with this string.               9îQi
  Qi         Insert it before a quotation mark.    9îQi"
9î           Repeat until it reaches length 9.     9îQi"9îQi
\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

Befunge-93, 25 22 bytes

-2*6<>:#,_@#:-5: _-p<"

Try it online!

Thanks to jimmy23013's answer for inspiring the idea to create the " before the wrapping string literal.

Previous answers have usually relied on non-standard interpreter behaviour in order to wrap a string literal around the code and avoid the extra spaces. My quine however, is compliant with Befunge-93 specs.

Befunge-93 has a bounding box of 80x25 cells, which are initially filled with spaces. This means the wrapping string literal, a staple of 2D quines, usually fills the stack with a lot of excess spaces.

How It Works:

-2*6<  Create the " character
                     " Start the wrapping string literal
                 _-p<  Pop all the spaces until there are none left
                       Note that p is the put command, which basically pops 3 items from the stack
            :-5:  Dupe the 2 and subtract 5 to replace the - that was destroyed
                  Dupe that again to compensate for the _
     >:#,_@#  Print until stack is empty and terminate

Alternatively:

++9*5<>:#,_@#::_$#-< "

also works for 22 bytes.

\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

Whitespace, 406 bytes

DISCLAIMER: This quine was not created by me, it is created by Smithers. Because this challenge was missing a Whitespace answer I decided to post his/her. If Smithers reads this and wants to post it himself/herself I will of course delete my answer.
Sources: Smithers' website and his/her Whitespace quine source code (note: it's missing a trailing new-line).

[S S S T    S S T   S T T   T   T   T   S T T   T   S S T   T   S S S T S T T   S T T   T   T   T   T   T   S T S S S T S S T   S S T   S T T   T   T   T   S T S T S S S T T   T   S S T   S T T   S S S S T   T   T   T   T   T   S S T   T   T   S T S T S S S T T   T   S S S S S S S T T   T   T   T   T   T   S T S S T   S S S T S T T   T   T   S S S S S T S T S S S T S T T   S T S S S T S S T   S S T   T   T   S S S S S S S T T   S T S S T   T   T   T   T   S S S T T   T   T   S S T   T   S T T   S S T   S T T   T   T   S S S S T   T   S S T   T   T   T   S T S S T   T   S S T   S S T   T   S S S S T   T   S S T   T   S S T   S S T   T   S T S T S T T   S S S T T   S T S N
_Push_67079405567184005086107571748115383207539763039497665210559156555730234138][S N
S _Duplicate][N
S T S N
_Call_Label_PRINT_SPACE][N
S T S N
_Call_Label_PRINT_SPACE][S S S T    S N
_Push_2][S N
T   _Swap][N
S T N
_Call_Label_RECURSIVE_PRINTER][S S S T  S T S N
_Push_10][T N
S S _Print_as_char][S N
N
_Drop][S S S T  T   N
_Push_3][S N
T   _Swap][N
S T N
_Call_Label_RECURSIVE_PRINTER][N
N
N
_Exit][N
S S N
_Create_Label_RECURSIVE_PRINTER][S N
S _Duplicate][N
T   S T N
_If_0_Jump_to_Label_DISCARD_TOP(_AND_PRINT_SPACE)][S T  S S T   N
_Copy_1][S T    S S T   N
_Copy_1][S T    S S T   N
_Copy_1][T  S T S _integer_divide][N
S T N
_Call_Label_RECURSIVE_PRINTER][T    S T T   _Modulo][S N
S _Duplicate][N
T   S T N
_If_0_Jump_to_Label_DISCARD_TOP(_AND_PRINT_SPACE)][S S S T  S S S N
_Push_8][T  S S S _Add][T   N
S S _Print_as_character][N
T   N
_Return][N
S S T   N
_Create_Label_DISCARD_TOP(_AND_PRINT_SPACE)][S N
N
_Discard][N
S S S N
_Create_Label_PRINT_SPACE][S S S T  S S S S S N
_Push_32][T N
S S _Print_as_character][N
T   N
_Return]

Letters S (space), T (tab), and N (new-line) added as highlighting only.
[..._some_action] added as explanation only.

Try it online (with raw spaces, tabs and new-lines only).

Whitespace is a stack-based language only using three characters: spaces, tabs and new-lines. In Whitespace the stack can only contain integers, and there are two options to print something to STDOUT: "Print as number" and "Print as character". In the case of "Print as character" it will print the character based on the unicode value at the top of the stack. Because whitespace uses spaces, tabs and new-lines, it means it'll have to print numbers 32, 9, and 10 respectively as characters to STDOUT for this quine.

Smithers uses a pretty ingenieus piece of code with the magic number (s)he found.

Pseudo-code:

Push 67079405567184005086107571748115383207539763039497665210559156555730234138
Duplicate top
Call function_PRINT_SPACE
Call function_PRINT_SPACE
Push 2
Swap top two
Call function_RECURSIVE_PRINTER
Push 10
Pop and print top as character
Discard top
Push 3
Swap top two
Call function_RECURSIVE_PRINTER
Exit program

function_RECURSIVE_PRINTER:
  Duplicate top
  If 0: Call function_DISCARD_TOP(_AND_PRINT_SPACE)
  Make a copy of the 2nd top item of the stack
  Make a copy of the 2nd top item of the stack
  Make a copy of the 2nd top item of the stack
  Integer-divide top two
  Call function_RECURSIVE_PRINTER
  Modulo top two
  Duplicate top
  If 0: Call function_DISCARD_TOP(_AND_PRINT_SPACE)
  Push 8
  Add top two
  Pop and print top as character
  Return

function_DISCARD_TOP(_AND_PRINT_SPACE):
  Discard top
function_PRINT_SPACE:
  Push 32
  Pop and print top as character
  Return

It first uses a recursive-loop which keeps integer-dividing the initial integer by 2 until it's 0. Once it's 0, it goes back over these values and does modulo-2, printing either a space (if the modulo-2 resulted in 0) or a tab (by adding 8 to the modulo-2 result of 1). This first part is used to print the magic number itself, which only consists of spaces and tabs, because pushing a number in Whitespace is done as follows (and thus doesn't contain any new-lines except for the single trailing one):

  • S: Enable Stack Manipulation
  • S: Push a number
  • S/T: Positive/Negative respectively
  • Some S/T, followed by a trailing N: The number as binary, where S=0 and T=1

After it has printed the spaces and tabs required for pushing the magic number itself, it pushes a 3 and will use the same recursive function with the magic number, integer-dividing and using modulo 3 instead of 2. Which will print the spaces (if the modulo-3 resulted in 0), or tabs/new-lines (by adding 8 to the modulo-3 result).

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2
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ You may be interested in my new Whitespace quine \$\endgroup\$
    – Jo King
    Oct 8, 2019 at 3:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JoKing Very nice! Well done! :) \$\endgroup\$ Oct 8, 2019 at 7:31
5
\$\begingroup\$

Perl 6, 31 27 bytes

<"<$_>~~.EVAL".say>~~.EVAL

Try it online!

No messing about with alternative q quotes or .perl, just <> and a good ol' EVAL quine.

Explanation:

<                 >         # Create a list of 
 "<$_>~~.EVAL".say          # The string '"<$_>~~.EVAL".say'
                   ~~       # Smartmatch the list by setting $_ to it
                     .EVAL  # Evaluate the string as code
 "<$_>~~.EVAL"              # Interpolate the $_ list into the string
              .say          # And print it with a newline
\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

Ruby, 27 bytes

eval s="$><<'eval s=';p s"

Try it online!

$><<'...' is equivalent to print'...' (outputs the string without a newline).

Note the newline at the end of the program.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site! Nice first answer :) \$\endgroup\$
    – DJMcMayhem
    Jun 12, 2017 at 17:07
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ doesn't p print a newline? \$\endgroup\$
    – Shelvacu
    Aug 11, 2019 at 23:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Shelvacu You're right; it should be 27 bytes. Interestingly, I went back and looked around, and I couldn't find any Ruby quines that included a newline in their source to match the output. Most seem to add an extra newline in their output like this one did. I also have a vague memory of coming across a 25-byte Ruby quine somewhere, I think in a demonstration of a new-at-the-time feature, but I haven't been able to find it again. \$\endgroup\$
    – Nnnes
    Aug 12, 2019 at 23:43
5
\$\begingroup\$

1+, 834 bytes

(|11+"*"+"1+\1+/)("|1/()11+^)(2|\""++1+/()""+^)++<+/(#|\##"\+;1#()\^\1#)+<+()()(")(2)(2)()()(")()(2)(")(2)()(")()(")()()()(2)(")()()()(2)()()(2)()(")()()()()(2)(2)(")()()()(2)()()(2)()(")(2)()(")(2)(")()(")()()()(2)(")(2)(2)()(")()(2)(")()()()(2)()()(2)()(")(")()(")()(")()()()(2)()()(2)()(")(2)()(2)()(2)(")()(")(2)(")()()(2)()(")()(2)(")(2)(2)()()(")()(2)(")()(2)(")(2)()(")()()()()(2)(2)(")()(2)(")(")(")(2)()(")(2)(")()()(2)()(")()(2)(")()()()(2)(")()(2)(")()(2)(")(")(")()()()(2)()()(2)()(")(2)()(2)()(2)(")()()()(2)()(")(2)(")(2)()(")()()()()(2)(2)(")()(2)(")()()()(2)(")()()()(2)(")(2)()(")(2)(")()()(2)()(")()()()(2)(")(2)()(2)()(2)(")(")(2)(")(2)()(")()()(2)()(")()(2)(")()()()(2)(")()()()(2)()()(2)()(")()(2)(")()()()(2)(")(")()(2)(")(")(2)()()(")(")()(2)(")()()()(2)(")()()()(2)(")(2)()(2)()(2)(")(2)(")(2)()()(2)(")(")(#)@

Try it online!

Defines all the subroutines before the data section, then calls the (#) subroutine at the end of the data. Instead of using 1s followed by totalling 1+s, we define subroutines for initialisation ((")), which pushes a 2 to the stack, incrementing (()), and doubling plus 2 (ironically, (2)). All of these also push the characters used to call the subroutine to the top of the stack to print after printing the rest. We also offset the data by 32, since all values are above that.

This is most certainly suboptimal, especially since I've been steadily golfing it down from ~2000 bytes. I suspect it can be sub-500 eventually, or even lower with a different strategy.

Here's my program encoder, though it needs some post-fiddling with the first value to make sense.

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5
\$\begingroup\$

Acc!!, 270 bytes

936025123570680582070742833115365117904492153588422750562053064415808293823109091171562255866020953926270476903421472061856963432351191541604543106801928196867870451324872393884426634
Count a while a-183 {
Write 48+(_/10^(182-a))%10
}
Count b while _ {
Write _%128
_/128

Try it online!

Explanation

...                          Set the accumulator to a large number
Count a while a-183 {        Loop from 0 to 182
Write 48+(_/10^(182-a))%10   Print the ath digit of the number
}
Count b while _ {            Loop while the accumulator is not zero
Write _%128                  Print the character of the accumulator modulo 128
_/128                        Integer divide the accumulator by 128
\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does base95 (or 92 for that matter) save any bytes? \$\endgroup\$
    – emanresu A
    Aug 1 at 19:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @emanresuA I still have to represent newlines, so i don't think i can without making the decoding section much longer. I can do base 126 instead, but that doesn't save anything \$\endgroup\$
    – Jo King
    Aug 2 at 2:44
5
\$\begingroup\$

Stax (packed), 43 bytes

å3o╞╝&∞╝7►JôyG♦◄╨s│*T→╢φY'┘ò☼≤⌠░▼e╓Δ█•Aφ/│.

Try it online!

Doesn't work because for some reason latin1 does not accept the C1 control codes.

For this version, the interpreter needs to be forced to output in latin1. Stax Encoding is used. There is an extra trailing newline, but this appears to be accepted here (judging from many other answers).

Explanation:

The unpacked source is:

"r{32-m2+c+95|EVB|EB128+s+"r{32-m2+c+95|EVB|EB128+s+
  • The first half simply pushes the string which is also the second half.

  • The second half builds the full unpacked source out of it and packs it:

    r{32-m2+c+95|EVB|EB128+s+ Second half
    r{32-m                    Reverse and subtract 32 from each character (for packing)
          2+                  Append 2 (double quote - 32)
            c+                Concatenate with self
              95|E            Decode as a base 95 integer (for packing)
                  VB|E        Encode as a base 256 interager (for packing)
                      B128+s+ Add 128 to the first byte (for packing)
                              Implicit output
    

Stax (packed), 103 bytes (50 characters)

üö╖╞╖┘û■Å╣ß$æi7⌐ê↔T)ç¢┤,I_º>┐ó♫Z╪Æ≤◄▐0σ▓☻E.α╬TŶ7É

Run and debug it

Source and output are UTF-8 here, so they are counted as such. Much longer, but UTF-8 is a little nicer to look at.

\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

PHP -r, 32 bytes

Saved 3 bytes thanks to Sisyphus' insight!

The content of this quine is mostly unprintable characters using the stringwise NOT operator so the test link is to Bash to rebuild the file from an xxd hexdump.

eval(~$_=.....................);

Try it online!

Explanation

In PHP it's possible to use the ~ operator to 'flip' all the bits in a byte to return a string that doesn't look anything like the original string, which works around the problem of having to encode, and then decode, things like quotes. This means it's possible to just call echo on the result.

Visual example of how ~ 'flips' the values.

This was built using the following approach:

$quine =
    // plain beginning 
    "eval(~\$_=".
    // flipped code with $_ interpolated
    ~'echo"eval(~\$_=$_);";' .
    // plain end
    ");"
;

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ 32 bytes - Try it online! \$\endgroup\$
    – Sisyphus
    Feb 5, 2021 at 0:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Sisyphus Of course! I'll update this later. Thank you! It's quite a competitive quine now! \$\endgroup\$ Feb 5, 2021 at 7:19
5
\$\begingroup\$

Red, 21 bytes

do s: "prin{do }?? s"

Try it online!

Explanation

?? is usually used when debugging, but it's also great for quines. Take the following code:

s: "foo"
?? s

It outputs s: "foo". Let's see what happens when we combine this with a do:

do s: "?? s"

As expected, we get s: "?? s". Ignoring the do, it's pretty much already a quine. We can easily fix this by adding a prin{do } before the ?? s:

do s: "prin{do }?? s"
\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is it alright if I bounty your first answer instead? \$\endgroup\$
    – Wezl oOvOo
    Jun 9, 2021 at 21:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Wzl Ah, yes that's perfectly fine. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 9, 2021 at 22:30
5
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Insitux, 171 103 85 bytes

(#(join(char-code,34)[%,%(char-code,41)])"(#(join(char-code,34)[%,%(char-code,41)])")

Note: Commas are treated as whitespace.

Try it! (The Insitux REPL replaces commas with spaces, but it still works.)

Explanation:

(
  #(join ;Function to process string
    (char-code 34) ;Join the following with '"'
    [
      % ;String (first half)
      % ;String (second half)
      (char-code 41) ;Code for ')'
    ]
  )
  ;Same as above, but in a string
  "(#(join(char-code,34)[%,%(char-code,41)])"
)
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2
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to Code Golf, and nice answer! \$\endgroup\$ Feb 22 at 16:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @RadvylfPrograms Thanks, it's my first quine! Glad someone noticed lol \$\endgroup\$ Feb 23 at 22:54
4
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SWI-Prolog, 22 bytes

a :-
        listing(a).
 

A surprisingly short and elegant solution.

The 8 spaces and the new line (the space in the last line is just to display the empty line, there is actually no space) are both required in SWI-Prolog because that is the formatting that listing displays in the interpreter.

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4
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TeaScript, 1 byte

1

Nothing too interesting. But if that's too boring...

TeaScript, 3 bytes

[q|

and if that's to boring...

TeaScript, 15 bytes

(ƒ`(${f})()`)()
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1
3 4
5
6 7
14

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