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Elixir is a relatively new functional language, which I've taken a deep interest in. I'd like to get general tips about golfing in Elixir and learn techniques that can be applied to code-golf problems that are somewhat specific to Elixir in general.


Based on so many similar questions about Python, Ruby, Javascript, etc. I'll also try to post tips as I learn more about the language.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What does Elixir running on the Erlang VM have to do with the Erlang language? \$\endgroup\$
    – Alex A.
    Commented Dec 5, 2015 at 4:03

6 Answers 6

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String and char arguments don't need spaces

For example, IO.puts"Hello, World!" and IO.puts'cat' are valid programs.

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Don't use the Pipe operator or parenthesis for calling methods

# With Pipe
arg |> M.a |> M.b |> M.c   # 24 Bytes
arg|>M.a|>M.b|>M.c         # 18 Bytes

# With Parenthesis
M.c(M.b(M.a(arg)))         # 18 Bytes

# Only Spaces
M.c M.b M.a arg            # 15 Bytes
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Inject code into strings

Instead of concatenating something into a string, like:

"prefix"<>code<>"suffix"

You can use #{} to insert it into the string:

"prefix#{code}suffix"

This will save 3 bytes.

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Avoid arrow functions where possible

...and use the &<func>(&1,&2...) notation. For example:

each 0..25,fn x->IO.puts slice(concat(a,a),x,26) # 48 bytes
each 0..25,&IO.puts slice(concat(a,a),&1,26)     # 44 bytes
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Map Arguments don't need spaces either

Like LegionMammal978's answer, you can leave out space when passing Map as an argument to a method:

IO.inspect%{a: 1,b: 2}
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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you similarly remove the spaces after the colons? \$\endgroup\$
    – Alex A.
    Commented Dec 5, 2015 at 20:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sadly, no. But you can remove spaces after semicolons and commas. \$\endgroup\$
    – Sheharyar
    Commented Dec 5, 2015 at 23:12
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use Bitwise

Say you want to import the module Bitwise, usually you would do:

import Bitwise

But there may be an alternative that works in some versions of Elixir:

use Bitwise

to save 3 bytes!

Even better if your only using a bit wise operator once, you can do:

Bitwise.&&&()

&&& being one of the many bitwise operators useable.

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    \$\begingroup\$ If you only need one bitwise op you can use Bitwise.&&&() or whatever too \$\endgroup\$
    – naffetS
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 14:58

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