450
\$\begingroup\$

So... uh... this is a bit embarrassing. But we don't have a plain "Hello, World!" challenge yet (despite having 35 variants tagged with , and counting). While this is not the most interesting code golf in the common languages, finding the shortest solution in certain esolangs can be a serious challenge. For instance, to my knowledge it is not known whether the shortest possible Brainfuck solution has been found yet.

Furthermore, while all of Wikipedia (the Wikipedia entry has been deleted but there is a copy at archive.org ), esolangs and Rosetta Code have lists of "Hello, World!" programs, none of these are interested in having the shortest for each language (there is also this GitHub repository). If we want to be a significant site in the code golf community, I think we should try and create the ultimate catalogue of shortest "Hello, World!" programs (similar to how our basic quine challenge contains some of the shortest known quines in various languages). So let's do this!

The Rules

  • Each submission must be a full program.
  • The program must take no input, and print Hello, World! to STDOUT (this exact byte stream, including capitalization and punctuation) plus an optional trailing newline, and nothing else.
  • The program must not write anything to STDERR.
  • If anyone wants to abuse this by creating a language where the empty program prints Hello, World!, then congrats, they just paved the way for a very boring answer.

    Note that there must be an interpreter so the submission can be tested. It is allowed (and even encouraged) to write this interpreter yourself for a previously unimplemented language.

  • Submissions are scored in bytes, in an appropriate (pre-existing) encoding, usually (but not necessarily) UTF-8. Some languages, like Folders, are a bit tricky to score - if in doubt, please ask on Meta.
  • This is not about finding the language with the shortest "Hello, World!" program. This is about finding the shortest "Hello, World!" program in every language. Therefore, I will not mark any answer as "accepted".
  • If your language of choice is a trivial variant of another (potentially more popular) language which already has an answer (think BASIC or SQL dialects, Unix shells or trivial Brainfuck-derivatives like Alphuck), consider adding a note to the existing answer that the same or a very similar solution is also the shortest in the other language.

As a side note, please don't downvote boring (but valid) answers in languages where there is not much to golf - these are still useful to this question as it tries to compile a catalogue as complete as possible. However, do primarily upvote answers in languages where the authors actually had to put effort into golfing the code.

For inspiration, check the Hello World Collection.

The Catalogue

The Stack Snippet at the bottom of this post generates the catalogue from the answers a) as a list of shortest solution per language and b) as an overall leaderboard.

To make sure that your answer shows up, please start your answer with a headline, using the following Markdown template:

## Language Name, N bytes

where N is the size of your submission. If you improve your score, you can keep old scores in the headline, by striking them through. For instance:

## Ruby, <s>104</s> <s>101</s> 96 bytes

If there you want to include multiple numbers in your header (e.g. because your score is the sum of two files or you want to list interpreter flag penalties separately), make sure that the actual score is the last number in the header:

## Perl, 43 + 2 (-p flag) = 45 bytes

You can also make the language name a link which will then show up in the snippet:

## [><>](https://esolangs.org/wiki/Fish), 121 bytes

/* Configuration */

var QUESTION_ID = 55422; // Obtain this from the url
// It will be like https://XYZ.stackexchange.com/questions/QUESTION_ID/... on any question page
var ANSWER_FILTER = "!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe";
var COMMENT_FILTER = "!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk";
var OVERRIDE_USER = 8478; // This should be the user ID of the challenge author.

/* App */

var answers = [], answers_hash, answer_ids, answer_page = 1, more_answers = true, comment_page;

function answersUrl(index) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/" +  QUESTION_ID + "/answers?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + ANSWER_FILTER;
}

function commentUrl(index, answers) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/" + answers.join(';') + "/comments?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + COMMENT_FILTER;
}

function getAnswers() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: answersUrl(answer_page++),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      answers.push.apply(answers, data.items);
      answers_hash = [];
      answer_ids = [];
      data.items.forEach(function(a) {
        a.comments = [];
        var id = +a.share_link.match(/\d+/);
        answer_ids.push(id);
        answers_hash[id] = a;
      });
      if (!data.has_more) more_answers = false;
      comment_page = 1;
      getComments();
    }
  });
}

function getComments() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: commentUrl(comment_page++, answer_ids),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      data.items.forEach(function(c) {
        if (c.owner.user_id === OVERRIDE_USER)
          answers_hash[c.post_id].comments.push(c);
      });
      if (data.has_more) getComments();
      else if (more_answers) getAnswers();
      else process();
    }
  });  
}

getAnswers();

var SCORE_REG = /<h\d>\s*([^\n,<]*(?:<(?:[^\n>]*>[^\n<]*<\/[^\n>]*>)[^\n,<]*)*),.*?(\d+)(?=[^\n\d<>]*(?:<(?:s>[^\n<>]*<\/s>|[^\n<>]+>)[^\n\d<>]*)*<\/h\d>)/;

var OVERRIDE_REG = /^Override\s*header:\s*/i;

function getAuthorName(a) {
  return a.owner.display_name;
}

function process() {
  var valid = [];
  
  answers.forEach(function(a) {
    var body = a.body;
    a.comments.forEach(function(c) {
      if(OVERRIDE_REG.test(c.body))
        body = '<h1>' + c.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG, '') + '</h1>';
    });
    
    var match = body.match(SCORE_REG);
    if (match)
      valid.push({
        user: getAuthorName(a),
        size: +match[2],
        language: match[1],
        link: a.share_link,
      });
    else console.log(body);
  });
  
  valid.sort(function (a, b) {
    var aB = a.size,
        bB = b.size;
    return aB - bB
  });

  var languages = {};
  var place = 1;
  var lastSize = null;
  var lastPlace = 1;
  valid.forEach(function (a) {
    if (a.size != lastSize)
      lastPlace = place;
    lastSize = a.size;
    ++place;
    
    var answer = jQuery("#answer-template").html();
    answer = answer.replace("{{PLACE}}", lastPlace + ".")
                   .replace("{{NAME}}", a.user)
                   .replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", a.language)
                   .replace("{{SIZE}}", a.size)
                   .replace("{{LINK}}", a.link);
    answer = jQuery(answer);
    jQuery("#answers").append(answer);

    var lang = a.language;
    lang = jQuery('<a>'+lang+'</a>').text();
    
    languages[lang] = languages[lang] || {lang: a.language, lang_raw: lang, user: a.user, size: a.size, link: a.link};
  });

  var langs = [];
  for (var lang in languages)
    if (languages.hasOwnProperty(lang))
      langs.push(languages[lang]);

  langs.sort(function (a, b) {
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() > b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return 1;
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() < b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return -1;
    return 0;
  });

  for (var i = 0; i < langs.length; ++i)
  {
    var language = jQuery("#language-template").html();
    var lang = langs[i];
    language = language.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", lang.lang)
                       .replace("{{NAME}}", lang.user)
                       .replace("{{SIZE}}", lang.size)
                       .replace("{{LINK}}", lang.link);
    language = jQuery(language);
    jQuery("#languages").append(language);
  }

}
body {
  text-align: left !important;
  display: block !important;
}

#answer-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 290px;
  float: left;
}

#language-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 500px;
  float: left;
}

table thead {
  font-weight: bold;
}

table td {
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/codegolf/all.css?v=ffb5d0584c5f">
<div id="language-list">
  <h2>Shortest Solution by Language</h2>
  <table class="language-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="languages">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<div id="answer-list">
  <h2>Leaderboard</h2>
  <table class="answer-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="answers">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="answer-template">
    <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="language-template">
    <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @isaacg No it doesn't. I think there would be some interesting languages where it's not obvious whether primality testing is possible. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 28 '15 at 13:56
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ If the same program, such as "Hello, World!", is the shortest in many different and unrelated languages, should it be posted separately? \$\endgroup\$ – aditsu quit because SE is EVIL Aug 28 '15 at 15:33
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007 Well it's hidden by default because the three code blocks take up a lot of space. I could minify them so that they are a single line each, but I'd rather keep the code maintainable in case bugs come up. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 28 '15 at 19:34
  • 8
    \$\begingroup\$ @ETHproductions "Unlike our usual rules, feel free to use a language (or language version) even if it's newer than this challenge." Publishing the language and an implementation before posting it would definitely be helpful though. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 29 '15 at 23:01
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @MartinEnder ... Almost. If two BF solutions have the same size, the one with smaller lexicographical order will take smaller number of bytes in Unary. Of course the smallest Unary solution translated to BF is guaranteed to be smallest. \$\endgroup\$ – user202729 May 20 '18 at 10:20

800 Answers 800

1
18 19
20
21 22
27
1
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jq, 17 bytes

(15 characters code + 2 characters command line options.)

"Hello, World!"

(jq being a JSON processor filter, for this task you have to specify the -n (null input) and -r (raw output) options.)

Sample run:

bash-4.3$ jq -nr '"Hello, World!"'
Hello, World!

On-line test (Passing -r through URL is not supported – check Raw Output yourself.)

| improve this answer | |
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1
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Y, 16 bytes

Try it here!

"Hello, World!"p

Or

"Hello, World!"g

The former prints everything, and the latter prints one thing. In each case, the single entity on the stack is the string "Hello, World!".

| improve this answer | |
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1
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bAdkOde, 59 bytes

I modified the example given on the language's website. Pushes the ASCII values in reverse order, then loops to print them.

)0)33)100)108)114)111)87)32)44)111)108)108)101)72(a{!a"a(a}
| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Vimscript, 17 bytes

ec"Hello, World!"
| improve this answer | |
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  • \$\begingroup\$ You can remove the colon to save one byte ;) \$\endgroup\$ – wefwefa3 Aug 30 '15 at 20:32
1
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Mmmm(), 1583 bytes

mmm=m[mm=m[m.m()].m(m.m())].m();mmmm=mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m())))));mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m(mmm.m())))))))))))))))));mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();m[mmmm].m(mmm.m());mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmmmm=mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmmmmmmm=mmm.m();m[mmmm].m(mmm.m());mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmmmmm=mmm.m();m[mmmm].m(mmmmmm);m[mmmm].m(mmmmmm);mmm.m();mmm.m();mmmmmmm=mmm.m();m[mmmm].m(mmmmmmm);mmm.m();mmm.m();mmmmmmmmm=mmm.m();mmm=m[mm].m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmmmmmmmmm=mmm.m();mmmmmmmmmmm=mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();mmm.m();m[mmmm].m(mmm.m());m[mmmm].m(mmmmmmmmmm);m[mmmm].m(mmmmm);m[mmmm].m(mmmmmmm);m[mmmm].m(mmmmmmmmm);m[mmmm].m(mmmmmm);m[mmmm].m(mmmmmmmm);m[mmmm].m(mmmmmmmmmmm)

A semi-golfed version of the "Hello, World!" program I wrote for the esolangs article a while back.

| improve this answer | |
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1
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Nemerle, 38 bytes

System.Console.Write("Hello, World!");

Description from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemerle

Nemerle's most notable feature is the ability to mix styles of programming that are object-oriented and functional. Programs may be structured using object-oriented concepts such as classes and namespaces, while methods can (optionally) be written in a functional style. Other notable features include:

  • strong type inference
  • a flexible metaprogramming subsystem (using macros)
  • full support for object-oriented programming (OOP), in the style of C#, Java, and C++
  • full support for functional programming, in the style of ML, OCaml, and Haskell, with these features:
    • higher-order functions
    • pattern matching
    • algebraic types
    • local functions
    • tuples and anonymous types
    • partial application of functions

The metaprogramming system allows for great compiler extensibility, embedding domain-specific languages, partial evaluation, and aspect-oriented programming, taking a high-level approach to lift as much of the burden as possible from programmers. The language combines all Common Language Infrastructure (CLI) standard features, including parametric polymorphism, lambdas, extension methods etc. Accessing the libraries included in the .NET or Mono platforms is as easy as in C#.

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Reng v.1, 22 bytes

I proudly present to you my new 2D language, Reng! It's a lot like ><>, and many of the commands are similar. However, Reng features a lot of more, erm, features. Here is the code!

"!dlroW ,olleH"!|o?!|~

This pushes each of the character codes in the string !dlroW ,olleH first. Then, ! jumps into a loop. o outputs a charcter, and ? activates the next character iff the top of the stack is zero. This does not happen untill there are no characters left. When this happens, the mirror is skipped and the end character is met, ~.

Here is a visual representation of the code, which can be found here:

Illustration

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

ForceLang, 24 bytes

io.write "Hello, World!"

Or, which is the same length:

gui.show "Hello, World!"
| improve this answer | |
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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Looks like Lua. Isn't Lua, is ForceLang. \$\endgroup\$ – cat Feb 29 '16 at 5:11
1
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Mathcad, 18 bytes #

(or 15 bytes or 13 bytes depending upon one's tastes)

enter image description here

18 bytes would seem to be more in keeping with the spirit of the game, in that the user only has to type "s=" to get the answer, whereas the other two options involve the user actually typing Hello, World! themselves.

However, such considerations can get a little confusing sometimes in Mathcad, as the "source" file is also normally the "stdout". This is because the Mathcad allows text, mathematical expressions, programs, plots and results to be mixed on the same worksheet (it's often helpful to regard Mathcad as a virtual whiteboard or document with live expressions).

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Cy, 21 18 bytes

"Hello, World!" :<

Cy is a new language I just made. It is stack-based/postfix, so the string "Hello, World!" must be pushed to the stack, then output it with the printing shortcut :<.

This is the first language I have made that was not inspired by code golf, but of course I'm still going to post in it.

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Pylongolf, 16 bytes

"Hello, World!"~

Push Hello, World! into the stack then print it.

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Constant, 115 bytes

ppp*eee-pP;_fao*R;_fo+pp;_coo+p;_fo;eec*ppc+ef;_o-ppppf;_oZ+eeeepc;_o+eeef*pf;_o+pf;_o-pec;_o
-eeef;_ozeeef*pc+lf;_o

(the newline is unnecessary) Ungolfed:

ppp * eee-pP;
_fao * R;
_fo + pp;
_coo + p;
_fo;
eec * ppc + ef;
_o-ppppf;
_oZ + eeeepc;
_o + eeef * pf;
_o + pf;
_o-pec;
_o-eeef;
_ozeeef * pc + lf;
_o;

Try it out here!

This is a very natural program, except that numbers are not composed of the conventional digits, but rather constants such as p (pi) and e (euler's number). _ is the last expression, f is floor, c is ceil, and o is character output.

| improve this answer | |
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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Nice answer. Constant looks almost as weird as NTFJ. \$\endgroup\$ – Rɪᴋᴇʀ Apr 4 '16 at 22:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @EasterlyIrk Then my mission has been accomplished. ^_^ \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien Apr 4 '16 at 22:41
1
\$\begingroup\$

META, 410 bytes

Try it here!

vXKZELI:{>.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v<;>^^;}{v.>::<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v:^^;}
WJSM
NT
{fv.>::<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.>>;<<v^^;}>;<.>>!{v<<.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v<;>^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}>>>.>;>;<<<<.>>.<<<{v.>::<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v:^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}{v..^;v..^;;>,<v.^;;v.>>;^<<;v.v.^^;}v>:<^.vvv?

This is another heckuva program. You want to know what it does, I'm sure. First, here's a nicer-looking version:

vXKZELI:{>.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v<;>^^;}{v.>::<.^;>,<
WJSMv.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v:^^;}{v.>::<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.>>;<<v^^;}>;<.>>!{v<<.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;
NTv.>>;<<^;v.v<;>^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}>>
>f.>;>;<<<<.>>.<<<{v.>::<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v:^^;}{v.>:<.^;>,<v.^;;v.>>;<<^;v.v.^^;}{v..
^;v..^;;>,<v.^;;v.>>;^<<;v.v.^^;}v>:<^.vvv?

The basis of META is that it selects characters from the source code and performs operations of them. ><^v move the selection pointer around, {} allow for an extra level of eval and :;.,!? perform 6 different operations.

Let c be the character in question, and @c be its charcode.

  • : yields atob(atob(c + c + "==") + c + "==")
  • ; yields atob(c + c + "==")
  • . yields char(127 - @atob(c + c + "=="))
  • , yields atob(c + char(127 - @c) + "==")
  • ! yields char(@c >> 2 ^ 94)
  • ? yields char((@c * 3 >> 3) + (@c >> 5))

Each time a char is yielded, it's pushed to a string, which is eval'd, then eval'd again.

The charset yielded by each character is not complete, so we cannot simply use these characters. The use of {} is mandatory for a lot of characters, which are constructed in a JSF**k-esque way.

A full explanation will take a ridiculously long time, and now I have to breathe some nice air.

| improve this answer | |
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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Are you sure this is META, not .kill() Jr.? \$\endgroup\$ – Rɪᴋᴇʀ Apr 16 '16 at 15:30
1
\$\begingroup\$

Molecule, 24 bytes (UTF-16)

"ৣ͢ҁᚇь͚ᕲ"C

Molecule files written must be written in UTF-16 for it to properly work.
This basically uses the string compression method.

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Pyke, 14 bytes

"Hello, World!

Try it here!

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Batsh, 23 bytes

print("Hello, World!");

Try it online!

One-sentence description

Batsh is a language which compiles to bash and Windows Batch, thereby providing effortless cross-platform support for shell scripts, without additional dependencies.

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Auo, 21 bytes

i.o:['Hello, World!']
| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Grin, 15 bytes

(Hello, World!)

Grin is a BF-based language that aims to make it slightly less of a Turing Tarpit.

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

APL, 15 bytes

'Hello, World!'

In APL, the last value is printed, so the hello world is obvious.

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Come Here, 19 bytes

TELL"Hello, World!"
| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ -4 removing the NEXT, trailing newline is optional. \$\endgroup\$ – Erik the Outgolfer Jun 2 '16 at 19:31
1
\$\begingroup\$

ABCD, 366 bytes

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADAAAAAAADDAAADBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBDBBBBBBBBBBBBDAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADAAADBBBBBBDBBBBBBBBDBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBD

Proof (note that I'm actually using the interpreter of ABCD)

| improve this answer | |
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1
\$\begingroup\$

64-bit Windows NT executable, 261591 bytes

Because why not?

Anyway, here's a 89,890-byte ZIP archive containing this executable: http://pastebin.com/raw/pJ6CeNuG (encoded in Base64)

------EDIT------

we don't allow link-only answers for off-site code

Okay. The C code I compiled the executable from is the classic Hello World program:

#include "stdio.h" // Use <cstdio> on C++
int main(){
    printf("Hello, World!");
}

The compiler is GCC without optimizations. Maybe other compilers (such as Intel C(++) Compiler or Clang) can generate smaller executables.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @downvoter Did you get a smaller/larger executable? \$\endgroup\$ – user8397947 Jan 10 '17 at 22:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Matheus Avellar got a much shorter executable (1175) from calling WriteConsoleA directly in asm (in a 32-bit PE executable). Did you even strip the compiler output of debug info? 261k is ridiculously huge, it's like an ungolfed baseline that you might mention in a real answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Cordes Apr 13 '18 at 2:51
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Golisp, 21 bytes

write@"Hello, World!"

Equivalent to write["Hello, World!"], but shorter.

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BruhScript, 28 bytes

I take the bytecount of the encoded version.

Source:

«Hello, World!

Encoded:

0000000: 007e 002f 0008 0018 0018 000e 0056 0005  .~./.........V..
0000010: 0021 000e 0009 0018 0012 0044            .!.........D

This insane count of NUL bytes is because the encoding of BruhScript is a 16-bit encoding.

This code is really simple. A block (string literal, lambda, etc...) don't need to be terminated at the end of file.

EDIT: BruhScript print every thing on the stack at the end of the program, so the print function is not needed

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scratchblocks2, 33 bytes

when gf clicked
say[Hello, World!
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Silicon, 15 bytes

"Hello, World!"

Everything in between the quotes are pushed onto the stack. Output is implicit, so no output command is needed.

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hashmap, 15 bytes

"Hello, World!"

Just push Hello, World!

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Gopher, 48 Bytes

Hello World (42 Characters)

&++<'×<&÷+<^-<<×-<#!+<$@-<&@<×-<@++<@<.!<=

Hello, World (45 Characters)

&++<'×<&÷+<^-<<×-<#÷+<!×<$@-<&@<×-<@++<@<.!<=

Hello, World! (50 Characters)

&++<'×<?^×+<^-<<×-<#÷+<@÷<'?^-<?^<×-<÷--<@<.!-<+<=

Hello, World! (48 Characters)

&++<'×<&÷+<^-<<×-<#÷+<!×<$@-<&@<×-<@++<@<.!-<+<=

Click Here to Run the Code
This is an esolang I created myself, Not strictly designed for golfing, But it can be fun

As far as I am aware, This is also the shortest Hello World in Gopher, Prove me wrong though
It'll help me improve the optimiser I built for it!

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Kipple, 55 bytes

33>o<100 108>o<114 111>o<87 32>o<44 111>o<108>o<101o<72

Shorter answer here. This, however, is supporter by each and every intepreter of the language. The other one uses ", which does not have full portability between interpreters.

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OPL-32, 33 bytes

...see Open Programming Language.

proc m:
print"Hello, World!"
endp

(no trailing newline)

Tested on Nokia Communicator 9300 with opl-1.56.

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