446
\$\begingroup\$

So... uh... this is a bit embarrassing. But we don't have a plain "Hello, World!" challenge yet (despite having 35 variants tagged with , and counting). While this is not the most interesting code golf in the common languages, finding the shortest solution in certain esolangs can be a serious challenge. For instance, to my knowledge it is not known whether the shortest possible Brainfuck solution has been found yet.

Furthermore, while all of Wikipedia (the Wikipedia entry has been deleted but there is a copy at archive.org ), esolangs and Rosetta Code have lists of "Hello, World!" programs, none of these are interested in having the shortest for each language (there is also this GitHub repository). If we want to be a significant site in the code golf community, I think we should try and create the ultimate catalogue of shortest "Hello, World!" programs (similar to how our basic quine challenge contains some of the shortest known quines in various languages). So let's do this!

The Rules

  • Each submission must be a full program.
  • The program must take no input, and print Hello, World! to STDOUT (this exact byte stream, including capitalization and punctuation) plus an optional trailing newline, and nothing else.
  • The program must not write anything to STDERR.
  • If anyone wants to abuse this by creating a language where the empty program prints Hello, World!, then congrats, they just paved the way for a very boring answer.

    Note that there must be an interpreter so the submission can be tested. It is allowed (and even encouraged) to write this interpreter yourself for a previously unimplemented language.

  • Submissions are scored in bytes, in an appropriate (pre-existing) encoding, usually (but not necessarily) UTF-8. Some languages, like Folders, are a bit tricky to score - if in doubt, please ask on Meta.
  • This is not about finding the language with the shortest "Hello, World!" program. This is about finding the shortest "Hello, World!" program in every language. Therefore, I will not mark any answer as "accepted".
  • If your language of choice is a trivial variant of another (potentially more popular) language which already has an answer (think BASIC or SQL dialects, Unix shells or trivial Brainfuck-derivatives like Alphuck), consider adding a note to the existing answer that the same or a very similar solution is also the shortest in the other language.

As a side note, please don't downvote boring (but valid) answers in languages where there is not much to golf - these are still useful to this question as it tries to compile a catalogue as complete as possible. However, do primarily upvote answers in languages where the authors actually had to put effort into golfing the code.

For inspiration, check the Hello World Collection.

The Catalogue

The Stack Snippet at the bottom of this post generates the catalogue from the answers a) as a list of shortest solution per language and b) as an overall leaderboard.

To make sure that your answer shows up, please start your answer with a headline, using the following Markdown template:

## Language Name, N bytes

where N is the size of your submission. If you improve your score, you can keep old scores in the headline, by striking them through. For instance:

## Ruby, <s>104</s> <s>101</s> 96 bytes

If there you want to include multiple numbers in your header (e.g. because your score is the sum of two files or you want to list interpreter flag penalties separately), make sure that the actual score is the last number in the header:

## Perl, 43 + 2 (-p flag) = 45 bytes

You can also make the language name a link which will then show up in the snippet:

## [><>](https://esolangs.org/wiki/Fish), 121 bytes

/* Configuration */

var QUESTION_ID = 55422; // Obtain this from the url
// It will be like https://XYZ.stackexchange.com/questions/QUESTION_ID/... on any question page
var ANSWER_FILTER = "!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe";
var COMMENT_FILTER = "!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk";
var OVERRIDE_USER = 8478; // This should be the user ID of the challenge author.

/* App */

var answers = [], answers_hash, answer_ids, answer_page = 1, more_answers = true, comment_page;

function answersUrl(index) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/" +  QUESTION_ID + "/answers?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + ANSWER_FILTER;
}

function commentUrl(index, answers) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/" + answers.join(';') + "/comments?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + COMMENT_FILTER;
}

function getAnswers() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: answersUrl(answer_page++),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      answers.push.apply(answers, data.items);
      answers_hash = [];
      answer_ids = [];
      data.items.forEach(function(a) {
        a.comments = [];
        var id = +a.share_link.match(/\d+/);
        answer_ids.push(id);
        answers_hash[id] = a;
      });
      if (!data.has_more) more_answers = false;
      comment_page = 1;
      getComments();
    }
  });
}

function getComments() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: commentUrl(comment_page++, answer_ids),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      data.items.forEach(function(c) {
        if (c.owner.user_id === OVERRIDE_USER)
          answers_hash[c.post_id].comments.push(c);
      });
      if (data.has_more) getComments();
      else if (more_answers) getAnswers();
      else process();
    }
  });  
}

getAnswers();

var SCORE_REG = /<h\d>\s*([^\n,<]*(?:<(?:[^\n>]*>[^\n<]*<\/[^\n>]*>)[^\n,<]*)*),.*?(\d+)(?=[^\n\d<>]*(?:<(?:s>[^\n<>]*<\/s>|[^\n<>]+>)[^\n\d<>]*)*<\/h\d>)/;

var OVERRIDE_REG = /^Override\s*header:\s*/i;

function getAuthorName(a) {
  return a.owner.display_name;
}

function process() {
  var valid = [];
  
  answers.forEach(function(a) {
    var body = a.body;
    a.comments.forEach(function(c) {
      if(OVERRIDE_REG.test(c.body))
        body = '<h1>' + c.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG, '') + '</h1>';
    });
    
    var match = body.match(SCORE_REG);
    if (match)
      valid.push({
        user: getAuthorName(a),
        size: +match[2],
        language: match[1],
        link: a.share_link,
      });
    else console.log(body);
  });
  
  valid.sort(function (a, b) {
    var aB = a.size,
        bB = b.size;
    return aB - bB
  });

  var languages = {};
  var place = 1;
  var lastSize = null;
  var lastPlace = 1;
  valid.forEach(function (a) {
    if (a.size != lastSize)
      lastPlace = place;
    lastSize = a.size;
    ++place;
    
    var answer = jQuery("#answer-template").html();
    answer = answer.replace("{{PLACE}}", lastPlace + ".")
                   .replace("{{NAME}}", a.user)
                   .replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", a.language)
                   .replace("{{SIZE}}", a.size)
                   .replace("{{LINK}}", a.link);
    answer = jQuery(answer);
    jQuery("#answers").append(answer);

    var lang = a.language;
    lang = jQuery('<a>'+lang+'</a>').text();
    
    languages[lang] = languages[lang] || {lang: a.language, lang_raw: lang, user: a.user, size: a.size, link: a.link};
  });

  var langs = [];
  for (var lang in languages)
    if (languages.hasOwnProperty(lang))
      langs.push(languages[lang]);

  langs.sort(function (a, b) {
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() > b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return 1;
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() < b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return -1;
    return 0;
  });

  for (var i = 0; i < langs.length; ++i)
  {
    var language = jQuery("#language-template").html();
    var lang = langs[i];
    language = language.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", lang.lang)
                       .replace("{{NAME}}", lang.user)
                       .replace("{{SIZE}}", lang.size)
                       .replace("{{LINK}}", lang.link);
    language = jQuery(language);
    jQuery("#languages").append(language);
  }

}
body {
  text-align: left !important;
  display: block !important;
}

#answer-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 290px;
  float: left;
}

#language-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 500px;
  float: left;
}

table thead {
  font-weight: bold;
}

table td {
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/codegolf/all.css?v=ffb5d0584c5f">
<div id="language-list">
  <h2>Shortest Solution by Language</h2>
  <table class="language-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="languages">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<div id="answer-list">
  <h2>Leaderboard</h2>
  <table class="answer-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="answers">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="answer-template">
    <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="language-template">
    <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @isaacg No it doesn't. I think there would be some interesting languages where it's not obvious whether primality testing is possible. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 28 '15 at 13:56
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ If the same program, such as "Hello, World!", is the shortest in many different and unrelated languages, should it be posted separately? \$\endgroup\$ – aditsu quit because SE is EVIL Aug 28 '15 at 15:33
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007 Well it's hidden by default because the three code blocks take up a lot of space. I could minify them so that they are a single line each, but I'd rather keep the code maintainable in case bugs come up. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 28 '15 at 19:34
  • 8
    \$\begingroup\$ @ETHproductions "Unlike our usual rules, feel free to use a language (or language version) even if it's newer than this challenge." Publishing the language and an implementation before posting it would definitely be helpful though. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 29 '15 at 23:01
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @MartinEnder ... Almost. If two BF solutions have the same size, the one with smaller lexicographical order will take smaller number of bytes in Unary. Of course the smallest Unary solution translated to BF is guaranteed to be smallest. \$\endgroup\$ – user202729 May 20 '18 at 10:20

791 Answers 791

1
10 11
12
13 14
27
2
\$\begingroup\$

Cardinal, 15 bytes

%"Hello, World!
| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

LMNtal, 35 bytes

io.use.io.print("Hello, World!",_).

A weird programming language from Japan that seems to be inspired by Prolog.

| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

Fishing, 37 bytes

v+CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
  `Hello, World!`N

I don't think there's anything to golf beyond the example listed on the esolangs page, so I didn't really write this myself. Hence, community wiki.

| improve this answer | |
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2
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HPPPL, 44 43 bytes

HP Prime Programming Language for the HP Prime color graphing calculator.

export h()begin print("Hello, World!");end;

(golfed down by one byte, thanks to kirbyfan64sos!)

Output:

Hello, World! HPPPL

This is a full program that you call by entering h to start it.

If you just want to have the output to the terminal, then a shorter (22 bytes) version in Home Mode works, too:

print("Hello, World!")

A free emulator is available here: http://www.hp-prime.de/en/category/13-emulator

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Is the space between the right parenthesis and begin needed? \$\endgroup\$ – kirbyfan64sos Sep 1 '15 at 13:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ @kirbyfan64sos Thanks for the hint. No, it’s not necessary. \$\endgroup\$ – M L Sep 1 '15 at 14:30
2
\$\begingroup\$

RUBE, 47 bytes

A cellular automaton-based language about warehouses, crates, dozers, and conveyor belts:

2
1
766
2c4
256
07f
662
cfc
466
85c
OOO
ccc
===

It turns out stacking all the crates on top of each other like 2\n1\n6\n... is also 57 bytes, and is "simpler", but I didn't want to stretch the page. :)

Update: stacking the crates into a rectangle is shorter! Who'd've thought?

| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

Doorspace, 92 bytes

The language is also known as Qugord.

~group h from %2 to %14 affect h into "Hello, World!" each h into 0 task give 0 to 1 publish

or

~group h from 0 to %12 affect h into "Hello, World!" each h into 0 task give 0 to %0 publish

It's seriously bugging me that this has a horizontal scrollbar because of a single character. I don't see how to shorten it any further though.

This solution is mostly a golfed version of the "Hello, World!" example on the esolangs page. The important concepts of the language are that it operates on an infinite main array, initialised to zeroes; and then there's also an output array, which is reset every time you print its contents. If you know what the commands mean, the code is actually quite readable if split across several lines (which is not valid in the language):

group h from %2 to %14 
affect h into "Hello, World!" 
each h into 0 task 
  give 0 to 1 
  publish

The first line defines a "group tag" h, which is some subarray of the main array. In this case, it addresses the cells at indices 2 to 14 (leaving 2 cells for future use).

The second line writes the character codes of Hello, World! into these 13 cells.

The third line defines a foreach loop over the cells in h, which works by copying the current value into the specified cell (0) and then executing the code after it.

The fourth line is executed once for each character code (which we find in cell 0). It moves the character code from the 0th cell of the main array to the 0th cell of the output array (which we index relatively by looking at index 1 on the main tape, which is zero).

The fifth line prints everything in the output array up to the last non-zero element (i.e. just the first cell in our case).

| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

Parenthetic, 1036 Bytes

This can undoubtedly be done better, but it's about the best I can come up with at the moment.

((()()())(()()()())((()()(()))((())()()()())((())()()()()()()()())))((()()())(()(())())((()(()))(()()()())((())()()()())))((()()())(()()(()()))((()()(()))(()()()())((())()()())))((()()())(()(()())())((()()(()))(()(())())((())()()())))((()(())()(()))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()()(()))(()(())())((())()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()))(()()(()()))((())()()()()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())(()(()())()))((()((()))())((()(())(())())(()(()())()))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()))(()(()())())((())()()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()))(()()()())((())()()()()()()()()()()()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())(()()()()))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()()))(()()(()()))((())()()()()()()()()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()))(()(()())())((())()()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()))(()(()())())((())()()()()()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())(()(()())()))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()))(()()(()()))((())()()()())))((()((()))())((()(())(())())((()(()))(()()()())((())())))(()((())))))))))))))))))

General Steps

Define A 32
Define B 36
Define C 32 * 3
Define D 36 * 3
Build a list of chars with (A*2)(C+5)(D)(D)(D+3)(A+12)(A)(C-9)(D+3)(D+6)(D)(C+4)(A+1)
Output list + empty set as string

| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

l33t, 104 bytes

7 99999998 1 7 9991 1 7 6 1 1 7 2 1 5 0 7 99997 1 8 92 1 6 0 8 995 1 7 995 1 7 2 1 8 5 1 8 7 1 5 0 7 0 1

I've been using the Ruby interpreter which seems to insert an 10 (END) at the end of the code implicitly.

l33t is supposed to look like l33t-5p34k. However, it is interpreted by simply summing the digits in each "word" and turning that into an opcode. So for golfing all we want is those digits. Golfing l33t like this is definitely living on the edge though. Quoting from the language spec:

It is possible to program in l33t just using numbers, i.e. not forming letters in l33t 5p34k. However, programmers who do this are teh sUxX0r, and the interpreter is well within its rights to format your hard drive for attempting this.

As for the language itself, it's basically a Brainfuck-derivative. The main differences are that the source code is living on the tape as well (with an independent memory and instruction pointer), and that you define an offset whenever you move forward, backward, increment or decrement (so you can make larger jumps and increment more efficiently). Therefore, the techniques used in the short Brainfuck solutions don't help much here.

I started out with the naive solution (increment/decrement to value, print, repeat). That was 105 bytes. I managed to shave off one byte by computing the symbols , ! on a different memory cell than the letters (because the offsets from o to ,, space to W and d to ! are expensive. I think I might be able to save a few more by jumping into the program memory, but I'll have to try that tomorrow.

| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

Wake, 16 bytes

:"Hello, World!"

Not much room for golfing.

| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

ShortScript, 2 bytes

By using the function from the standard library:

$H

And by not using it:

→Hello, World!
| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ That library seems to be missing from your reference implementation on Esolang. \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Sep 4 '15 at 14:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I the current version is a bit buggy \$\endgroup\$ – YourDeathIsComing Sep 4 '15 at 16:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have updated the esolangs page. Now it will work. \$\endgroup\$ – YourDeathIsComing Sep 4 '15 at 17:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ That implementation doesn't seem to print the exclamation point. \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Sep 4 '15 at 17:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ I will fix it tomorrow, when I am at PC. \$\endgroup\$ – YourDeathIsComing Sep 5 '15 at 21:02
2
\$\begingroup\$

Scheme, 24 26 25 bytes

(write "Hello, World!")

(display"Hello, World!")

simple but no one has done it in this language yet.

edit: fixed the quotes being printed.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ i changed the code a little so it doesn't show the quotes \$\endgroup\$ – Buzz Aug 31 '15 at 14:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ Are the quote marks necessary in case of display? The H in Hello needs to be upper-case btw. \$\endgroup\$ – CodeManX Sep 3 '15 at 0:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ @CoDEmanX Yeah the quotes are necessary. Otherwise it thinks its a variable. \$\endgroup\$ – Buzz Sep 3 '15 at 13:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sure you can't get rid of the space before "? \$\endgroup\$ – Lynn Sep 4 '15 at 14:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ That space can be removed. Normally scheme needs the spaces to tell two things apart. but in this case it doesn't need it \$\endgroup\$ – Buzz Sep 4 '15 at 14:28
2
\$\begingroup\$

Quipu, 41 bytes

'H
'e
'l
'l
'o
',
' 
'W
'o
'r
'l
'd
'!
/\

Quipu looks like an interesting language, but I don't think there's anything to golf off this "Hello, World!" example from the esolangs page.

| improve this answer | |
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2
\$\begingroup\$

Sieve, 69 bytes

+|72|.+|101|.+|108|..>+|111|.>+|44|.-|32|.+|87|.<.+++.<.-|100|.-|33|.

Sieve is a BF-like programming language. It adds a special command |X|, called a sieve, that executes the command before it until the selected tape unit is equal to the number within the sieve. +|72|. outputs the character 72, which is an "H".

Here's an alternative with the same byte count:

+|72|.+|101|.+|108|..>+|111|.>+|44|.-|32|.>+|87|.<<.+++.<.-|100|.>>+.

The only change is that it saves 32 (space) and uses it later to print 33 (!).

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you save some bytes by leaving the cell of the space untouched for World and then going back to it to print ! with a simple +.? \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Sep 5 '15 at 21:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MartinBüttner Yes, oops. \$\endgroup\$ – The_Basset_Hound Sep 5 '15 at 21:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MartinBüttner Actually, the byte count is the same. \$\endgroup\$ – The_Basset_Hound Sep 5 '15 at 21:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ +|72|.+|101|.>+|108|..>+|111|.>+|44|.-|32|.+|87|.<.+++.<.<-.-|33|. for 66 \$\endgroup\$ – Sp3000 Sep 6 '15 at 5:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Sp3000 Welp, already getting my butt kicked at my own language. \$\endgroup\$ – The_Basset_Hound Sep 6 '15 at 20:07
2
\$\begingroup\$

Ceylon, 40 bytes (or 24)

A file with this content can be executed in the Ceylon IDE:

shared void h(){print("Hello, World!");}

As Ceylon has no "top-level procedural code", all code needs to be either in a class or in a function. And only shared functions/classes can be called from outside ... and the IDE will chose the only shared function or class, if there is only one.

The Ceylon Web runner seems not to accept that text (it complains that "shared declaration is not a member of a class, interface, or package"), but instead allows directly statements:

print("Hello, World!");

(I guess the entered text is automatically wrapped in a function, and you can't declare stuff inside a function shared.)

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Monkeys, 505 bytes

6 DOWN
6 DOWN
7 RIGHT
7 RIGHT
6 LEFT
5 DOWN
5 DOWN
5 DOWN
7 BOND
6 BOND
6 BOND
7 YELL
7 DOWN
6 DOWN
6 BOND
7 LEFT
6 LEFT
7 YELL
7 LEFT
7 LEFT
6 BOND
6 LEFT
6 LEFT
7 YELL
7 YELL
6 LEFT
6 LEFT
6 LEFT
7 YELL
5 BOND
7 LEFT
7 YELL
6 LEFT
6 LEFT
6 LEFT
6 LEFT
5 BOND
7 YELL
7 DOWN
7 DOWN
7 DOWN
5 DOWN
5 DOWN
5 DOWN
5 BOND
7 YELL
6 LEFT
7 DOWN
6 BOND
7 DOWN
7 YELL
7 LEFT
7 LEFT
7 LEFT
7 YELL
7 LEFT
6 LEFT
5 BOND
5 BOND
5 BOND
7 YELL
7 LEFT
6 DOWN
6 DOWN
6 BOND
7 LEFT
7 YELL
7 LEFT
6 DOWN
6 DOWN
6 BOND
7 YELL

I wanted to post this one for a while, but the interpreter had several bugs. However, David Catt (the author) was kind enough to upload a new, working interpreter, so I got to work...

I have no idea how to golf this language effectively, because there are so many things which are interacting. My basic approach was this:

  • Move monkeys 5, 6 and 7 to the bottom row, like this:

    ..!1.!....
    .......2!.
    .........!
    .3.!......
    .......!..
    .!....!...
    ....!4....
    ........!.
    ......!...
    ..576...!.
    

    At this point they have values 1, 1, 2.

  • This gives me comparably flexible operations: I can increment 5 and 7, or 7 and 6. I can decrement each one individually. And I can multiply 7 by the value of either 5 or 6 (mod 256).

  • So I just wrote a simple Mathematica program to look into short ways to get 7 to the next value via a few multiplications and de/increments. This search was not exhaustive, but provided much better results than naively incrementing/decrementing to the next value.

There are many more opportunities to golf this though:

  • One can use the other arithmetic operators, particularly addition and subtraction could be useful.
  • I'm always using 7 for printing - allowing 5 or 6 to print (or involving even more monkeys) might shorten things.
  • One could try to store some useful values like 111 or 32 in a monkey for later use.
  • Arrange the monkeys vertically, so that one could use UP instead of LEFT.
  • Maybe this can even be shortened with loops.

...but the language is so complicated that I'm not sure how to explore these possibilities systematically.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Symball, 47 bytes

'0H'0e'0l'0l'0o*59$-$1$'1$'0_'0W'0o'0r'0l'0d'1-

Try it here. (dead link)

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ The link is dead. \$\endgroup\$ – LegionMammal978 Sep 30 '15 at 0:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ That's unfortunate. I've replaced the link at the top with a link to the Esolang page, but unless the website comes back, there are no docs and no interpreter... \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Sep 30 '15 at 0:25
2
\$\begingroup\$

C#, 67 Bytes

class a{static void Main(){System.Console.Write("Hello, World!");}}
| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ This has been posted before \$\endgroup\$ – RobIII Oct 2 '15 at 13:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ I missed it. Sorry. \$\endgroup\$ – Ken Gregory Oct 2 '15 at 18:07
2
\$\begingroup\$

Minkolang 0.1, 18 bytes

"Hello world!"(O).

"Hello world!" is pushed onto the stack in reverse order (by Minkolang), then (O) repeatedly prints the top of stack (as it's a while loop) until it's empty, at which point the program counter proceeds to . and terminates.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ From the explanation, it sounds like the parentheses can be dropped. But correct me if I'm wrong. \$\endgroup\$ – SuperJedi224 Oct 16 '15 at 11:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ @SuperJedi224: The parentheses are the while loop. The O outputs the top of stack as a character. \$\endgroup\$ – El'endia Starman Oct 16 '15 at 17:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ But I think you can just do that once without the loop. \$\endgroup\$ – SuperJedi224 Oct 16 '15 at 19:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ @SuperJedi224: It would only output "H". \$\endgroup\$ – El'endia Starman Oct 16 '15 at 20:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh, so it pushes the individual characters and not the entire string at once. Thanks for explaining that for me. \$\endgroup\$ – SuperJedi224 Oct 16 '15 at 20:33
2
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BotEngine, 2x15=30

vHello, World!
>eeeeeeeeeeeeeP
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2
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Ouroboros, 27

S"Hello, World!"1(
13wSoL!(

The program consists of two lines of code, each of which represents an ouroboros snake.

Snake 1

S sets the snake's active stack to the shared stack. The string literal pushes the character codes of Hello, World! in reverse order. Finally, 1( causes the snake to swallow the last character of its tail. Since this is the instruction that the IP is currently on, the snake dies.

Snake 2

13w causes the snake to wait for 13 ticks (so snake 1 can finish pushing the string). S switches to the shared stack and o outputs a character. L! pushes the length of the shared stack and logically negates it, resulting in 1 if the stack is empty and 0 if not. ( swallows that many characters of the snake's tail. If the stack is not yet empty, nothing is swallowed, and control loops back to the head of the snake, where it waits a while, sets the active stack as the shared stack, and outputs the next character. Once all the characters have been output, L! gives 1, and the snake swallows its IP and dies.

See it in action via Stack Snippet:

// Define Stack class
function Stack() {
  this.stack = [];
  this.length = 0;
}
Stack.prototype.push = function(item) {
  this.stack.push(item);
  this.length++;
}
Stack.prototype.pop = function() {
  var result = 0;
  if (this.length > 0) {
    result = this.stack.pop();
    this.length--;
  }
  return result;
}
Stack.prototype.top = function() {
  var result = 0;
  if (this.length > 0) {
    result = this.stack[this.length - 1];
  }
  return result;
}
Stack.prototype.toString = function() {
    return "" + this.stack;
  }

// Define Snake class
function Snake(code) {
  this.code = code;
  this.length = this.code.length;
  this.ip = 0;
  this.ownStack = new Stack();
  this.currStack = this.ownStack;
  this.alive = true;
  this.wait = 0;
  this.partialString = this.partialNumber = null;
}
Snake.prototype.step = function() {
    if (!this.alive) {
      return null;
    }
    if (this.wait > 0) {
      this.wait--;
      return null;
    }
    var instruction = this.code.charAt(this.ip);
    var output = null;
    if (this.partialString !== null) {
      // We're in the middle of a double-quoted string
      if (instruction == '"') {
        // Close the string and push its character codes in reverse order
        for (var i = this.partialString.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
          this.currStack.push(this.partialString.charCodeAt(i));
        }
        this.partialString = null;
      } else {
        this.partialString += instruction;
      }
    } else if (instruction == '"') {
      this.partialString = "";
    } else if ("0" <= instruction && instruction <= "9") {
      if (this.partialNumber !== null) {
        this.partialNumber = this.partialNumber + instruction; // NB: concatenation!
      } else {
        this.partialNumber = instruction;
      }
      next = this.code.charAt((this.ip + 1) % this.length);
      if (next < "0" || "9" < next) {
        // Next instruction is non-numeric, so end number and push it
        this.currStack.push(+this.partialNumber);
        this.partialNumber = null;
      }
    } else if ("a" <= instruction && instruction <= "f") {
      // a-f push numbers 10 through 15
      var value = instruction.charCodeAt(0) - 87;
      this.currStack.push(value);
    } else if (instruction == "$") {
      // Toggle the current stack
      if (this.currStack === this.ownStack) {
        this.currStack = this.program.sharedStack;
      } else {
        this.currStack = this.ownStack;
      }
    } else if (instruction == "s") {
      this.currStack = this.ownStack;
    } else if (instruction == "S") {
      this.currStack = this.program.sharedStack;
    } else if (instruction == "l") {
      this.currStack.push(this.ownStack.length);
    } else if (instruction == "L") {
      this.currStack.push(this.program.sharedStack.length);
    } else if (instruction == ".") {
      var item = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(item);
      this.currStack.push(item);
    } else if (instruction == "m") {
      var item = this.ownStack.pop();
      this.program.sharedStack.push(item);
    } else if (instruction == "M") {
      var item = this.program.sharedStack.pop();
      this.ownStack.push(item);
    } else if (instruction == "y") {
      var item = this.ownStack.top();
      this.program.sharedStack.push(item);
    } else if (instruction == "Y") {
      var item = this.program.sharedStack.top();
      this.ownStack.push(item);
    } else if (instruction == "\\") {
      var top = this.currStack.pop();
      var next = this.currStack.pop()
      this.currStack.push(top);
      this.currStack.push(next);
    } else if (instruction == "@") {
      var c = this.currStack.pop();
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(c);
      this.currStack.push(a);
      this.currStack.push(b);
    } else if (instruction == ";") {
      this.currStack.pop();
    } else if (instruction == "+") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(a + b);
    } else if (instruction == "-") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(a - b);
    } else if (instruction == "*") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(a * b);
    } else if (instruction == "/") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(a / b);
    } else if (instruction == "%") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(a % b);
    } else if (instruction == "_") {
      this.currStack.push(-this.currStack.pop());
    } else if (instruction == "I") {
      var value = this.currStack.pop();
      if (value < 0) {
        this.currStack.push(Math.ceil(value));
      } else {
        this.currStack.push(Math.floor(value));
      }
    } else if (instruction == ">") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(+(a > b));
    } else if (instruction == "<") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(+(a < b));
    } else if (instruction == "=") {
      var b = this.currStack.pop();
      var a = this.currStack.pop();
      this.currStack.push(+(a == b));
    } else if (instruction == "!") {
      this.currStack.push(+!this.currStack.pop());
    } else if (instruction == "?") {
      this.currStack.push(Math.random());
    } else if (instruction == "n") {
      output = "" + this.currStack.pop();
    } else if (instruction == "o") {
      output = String.fromCharCode(this.currStack.pop());
    } else if (instruction == "r") {
      var input = this.program.io.getNumber();
      this.currStack.push(input);
    } else if (instruction == "i") {
      var input = this.program.io.getChar();
      this.currStack.push(input);
    } else if (instruction == "(") {
      this.length -= Math.floor(this.currStack.pop());
      this.length = Math.max(this.length, 0);
    } else if (instruction == ")") {
      this.length += Math.floor(this.currStack.pop());
      this.length = Math.min(this.length, this.code.length);
    } else if (instruction == "w") {
      this.wait = this.currStack.pop();
    }
    // Any instruction not covered by the above cases is ignored
    if (this.ip >= this.length) {
      // We've swallowed the IP, so this snake dies
      this.alive = false;
      this.program.snakesLiving--;
    } else {
      // Increment IP and loop if appropriate
      this.ip = (this.ip + 1) % this.length;
    }
    return output;
  }

// Define Program class
function Program(source, speed, io) {
  this.sharedStack = new Stack();
  this.snakes = source.split(/\r?\n/).map(function(snakeCode) {
    var snake = new Snake(snakeCode);
    snake.program = this;
    snake.sharedStack = this.sharedStack;
    return snake;
  }.bind(this));
  this.snakesLiving = this.snakes.length;
  this.io = io;
  this.speed = speed || 10;
  this.halting = false;
}
Program.prototype.run = function() {
  if (this.snakesLiving) {
    this.step();
    this.timeout = window.setTimeout(this.run.bind(this), 1000 / this.speed);
  }
}
Program.prototype.step = function() {
  for (var s = 0; s < this.snakes.length; s++) {
    var output = this.snakes[s].step();
    if (output) {
      this.io.print(output);
    }
  }
}
Program.prototype.halt = function() {
  window.clearTimeout(this.timeout);
}
var ioFunctions = {
  print: function(item) {
    var stdout = document.getElementById('stdout');
    stdout.value += "" + item;
  },
  getChar: function() {
    if (inputData) {
      var inputChar = inputData[0];
      inputData = inputData.slice(1);
      return inputChar.charCodeAt(0);
    } else {
      return -1;
    }
  },
  getNumber: function() {
    while (inputData && (inputData[0] < "0" || "9" < inputData[0])) {
      inputData = inputData.slice(1);
    }
    if (inputData) {
      var inputNumber = inputData.match(/\d+/)[0];
      inputData = inputData.slice(inputNumber.length);
      return +inputNumber;
    } else {
      return -1;
    }
  }
};
var program = null;
var inputData = null;

function resetProgram() {
  var stdout = document.getElementById('stdout');
  stdout.value = null;
  if (program !== null) {
    program.halt();
  }
  program = null;
  inputData = null;
}

function initProgram() {
  var source = document.getElementById('source'),
    stepsPerSecond = document.getElementById('steps-per-second'),
    stdin = document.getElementById('stdin');
  program = new Program(source.value, +stepsPerSecond.innerHTML, ioFunctions);
  inputData = stdin.value;
}

function runBtnClick() {
  if (program === null || program.snakesLiving == 0) {
    resetProgram();
    initProgram();
  } else {
    program.halt();
    var stepsPerSecond = document.getElementById('steps-per-second');
    program.speed = +stepsPerSecond.innerHTML;
  }
  program.run();
}

function stepBtnClick() {
  if (program === null) {
    initProgram();
  } else {
    program.halt();
  }
  program.step();
}
.container {
  width: 100%;
  padding: 6px 0;
}
.so-box {
  font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif;
  font-weight: bold;
  color: #fff;
  text-align: center;
  padding: .3em .7em;
  font-size: 1em;
  line-height: 1.1;
  border: 1px solid #c47b07;
  -webkit-box-shadow: 0 2px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3), 0 2px 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.15) inset;
  text-shadow: 0 0 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);
  background: #f88912;
  box-shadow: 0 2px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3), 0 2px 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.15) inset;
}
.control {
  display: inline-block;
  border-radius: 6px;
  float: left;
  margin-right: 25px;
  cursor: pointer;
}
.option {
  padding: 10px 20px;
  margin-right: 25px;
  float: left;
}
h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', serif;
}
a {
  text-decoration: none;
}
input,
textarea {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
textarea {
  display: block;
  white-space: pre;
  overflow: auto;
  height: 40px;
  width: 100%;
  max-width: 100%;
  min-height: 25px;
}
span[contenteditable] {
  padding: 2px 6px;
  background: #cc7801;
  color: #fff;
}
#stdout-container,
#stdin-container {
  height: auto;
}
#stdin-container {
  display: none;
}
#reset {
  float: right;
}
#source-display-wrapper {
  display: none;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  overflow: auto;
  border: 1px solid black;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
#source-display {
  font-family: monospace;
  white-space: pre;
  padding: 2px;
}
.activeToken {
  background: #f88912;
}
.clearfix:after {
  content: ".";
  display: block;
  height: 0;
  clear: both;
  visibility: hidden;
}
.clearfix {
  display: inline-block;
}
* html .clearfix {
  height: 1%;
}
.clearfix {
  display: block;
}
<!--
Designed and written 2015 by D. Loscutoff
Much of the HTML and CSS was taken from this Befunge interpreter by Ingo Bürk: http://codegolf.stackexchange.com/a/40331/16766
-->
<div class="container">
  <textarea id="source" placeholder="Enter your program here" wrap="off">S"Hello, World!"1(
13wSoL!(</textarea>
  <div id="source-display-wrapper">
    <div id="source-display"></div>
  </div>
</div>
<div id="stdin-container" class="container">
  <textarea id="stdin" placeholder="Input" wrap="off"></textarea>
</div>
<div id="controls-container" class="container clearfix">
  <input type="button" id="run" class="control so-box" value="Run" onclick="runBtnClick()" />
  <input type="button" id="pause" class="control so-box" value="Pause" onclick="program.halt()" />
  <input type="button" id="step" class="control so-box" value="Step" onclick="stepBtnClick()" />
  <input type="button" id="reset" class="control so-box" value="Reset" onclick="resetProgram()" />
</div>
<div id="stdout-container" class="container">
  <textarea id="stdout" placeholder="Output" wrap="off" readonly></textarea>
</div>
<div id="options-container" class="container">
  <div class="option so-box">Steps per Second: <span id="steps-per-second" contenteditable>100</span>
  </div>
</div>

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2
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AniRad, 237 bytes

I doubt if this is the shortest solution:

 # # #   # # # #
#5+7*3      *2  =C
 / * +       *
#9*9+9+5+6      =C
   + *   +
#> 9*9+1+9  +9+8=C
   +     +   * *
#^ 9     > 4*6  =C
     +     *
#9+1*9+9+5+3  +4=C
   + -     * - +
#  6-6  +4*9+8 1=C
   = =     = = =
   C C     C C C

This is a 2D esolang which looks a bit like a magic square. This is a very early stage of the language, so a lot of new functions etc. will come in the future.

The # is the starting point of the pointer. The interpreter goes through every starting point. The order is based on the position of the #:

   4 5 6 7
   # # # #
1 #

2 #
 
3 #

If the position of the starting point is on the left, the pointer direction is right. If the position of the starting point is on the top, the pointer direction is down.

The +, -, * and / are just basic math operators. After reading a number from the pointer, every other number on it's path will be ignored until an operation has been executed, e.g. #4+3 5-2= is equivalent to #4+3-2=

The direction of the pointer can be changed with >, ^, < and v

To output a char, we use the =C. This outputs the result of all the math operators and converts the int to a char. If = is used, the interpreter will only print the result.

Here are all the paths executed in the program:

(1)  5+7*3*2           = (((5+7)*3)*2)            = 72  = H
(2)  9*9+9+5+6         = ((((9*9)+9)+5)+6)        = 101 = e
(3)  9*9+1+9+9+8       = (((((9*9)+1)+9)+9)+8)    = 108 = l
(4)  9*9+1+9+9+8       = (((((9*9)+1)+9)+9)+8)    = 108 = l
(5)  9+1*9+9+5+3+4     = (((((9+1)*9)+9)+5)+3)+4) = 111 = o
(6)  6-6+4*9+8         = ((((6-6)+4)*9)+8)        = 44  = ,
(7)  5/9*9+1+9+9+8     = ((((((5/9)*9)+1)+9)+9)+8)= 32  = 
(8)  7*9+9+9+6         = ((((7*9)+9)+9)+6)        = 87  = W
(9)  3+9*9+9-6         = ((((3+9)*9)+9)-6)        = 111 = o
(10) 6+9+4*6           = (((6+9)+4)*6)            = 114 = r
(11) 4*3*9             = ((4*3)*9)                = 108 = l
(12) 2*9*6-8           = (((2*9)*6)-8)            = 100 = d
(13) 8*4+1             = (8*4)+1                  = 33  = !
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2
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Mathematica, 21 bytes

Print@"Hello, World!"

Mathemaica 10.3, 20 bytes

Echo@"Hello, World!"
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  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Feel free to count the 10.3 version as the main solution and include the older one for reference. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Nov 10 '15 at 13:38
2
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Kotlin, 49 bytes

fun main(a:Array<String>){print("Hello, World!")}

This is a programming language created by JetBrains to overcome the limitations of Java (like Scala), be fast (like Java itself) and yet retain full interoperability with Java. This means that Kotlin can easily call Java code ... and vice versa.

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2
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Arcyóu, 18 15 bytes

"Hello, World!"

Arcyóu is a LISP-like golfing language. Since this is the only thing in the program, we don't need a p function or even parentheses. Just quotes.

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  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ No need for the disclaimer here. Newer languages are allowed and even encouraged this time. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Nov 22 '15 at 15:11
2
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AutoHotkey, 61 bytes

DllCall("AllocConsole")
FileAppend % "Hello, World!", CONOUT$

AHK was written to automate Windows tasks and it seems as if the authors considered StdOut/In as an after thought. This is the shortest method I could come up with. When executed the console will flash with Hello World! and exit immediately, it would require additional code (either adding a Hotkey or #persistent or sleep command) to keep the console active, however I feel this does the job and meets the requirements. I could also make the program with DLLCall("AttachConsole, Int, -1") so that it can be executed from the command line and write to the same console it was executed from, however this code golf.

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Greetings from the future! I can't tell if this worked at the time but it works now and its 27 bytes: FileAppend,Hello`, World!,* \$\endgroup\$ – Engineer Toast Apr 5 '17 at 15:53
2
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Hodor, 66 bytes

hodor.hod("Hhodor? Hodor!? Hodor!? o, Hooodorrhodor orHodor!? d!")

This only works in the previous version of Hodor (the one before the update from 1 July 2015). The latest version prints HODOR instead, which could be fixed at the cost of 3 bytes:

hodor.hod("Hhodor? Hodor!? Hodor!? o, Hooodorrhodor orHodor!? "+"d!")
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2
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TRANSCRIPT, 36 bytes

He is here.
>HE, Hello, World!
>X HE

The second line sets HE, and the third line outputs it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I was initially going to post this, but for some reason I kept getting errors whenever I tried to use single-char NPC names... \$\endgroup\$ – Sp3000 Sep 1 '15 at 13:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Sp3000 You're right, I just looked at the interpreter and found that it only matches two-letter words or longer. \$\endgroup\$ – LegionMammal978 Sep 1 '15 at 21:15
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @LegionMammal978 You should use He. \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Sep 1 '15 at 21:55
2
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Seriously 0.1, 1 byte

H

Try it online

Yes, I made my language have a one-byte Hello World program. A less boring answer for 16 bytes:

"Hello, World!".

"Hello, World!" pushes that string onto the stack, and . pops the top value on the stack and prints it.

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2
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Par, 14 bytes

`Hello, World!

I don't know Par, but it looks golfy.

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2
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Templates Considered Harmful, 50 bytes

St<72,'e','l','l','o',44,32,87,'o',114,'l','d',33>

Templates Considered Harmful is a language defined by C++ templates. The St template creates a string of characters, which is then implicitly printed to STDOUT.

| improve this answer | |
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