467
\$\begingroup\$

So... uh... this is a bit embarrassing. But we don't have a plain "Hello, World!" challenge yet (despite having 35 variants tagged with , and counting). While this is not the most interesting code golf in the common languages, finding the shortest solution in certain esolangs can be a serious challenge. For instance, to my knowledge it is not known whether the shortest possible Brainfuck solution has been found yet.

Furthermore, while all of Wikipedia (the Wikipedia entry has been deleted but there is a copy at archive.org ), esolangs and Rosetta Code have lists of "Hello, World!" programs, none of these are interested in having the shortest for each language (there is also this GitHub repository). If we want to be a significant site in the code golf community, I think we should try and create the ultimate catalogue of shortest "Hello, World!" programs (similar to how our basic quine challenge contains some of the shortest known quines in various languages). So let's do this!

The Rules

  • Each submission must be a full program.
  • The program must take no input, and print Hello, World! to STDOUT (this exact byte stream, including capitalization and punctuation) plus an optional trailing newline, and nothing else.
  • The program must not write anything to STDERR.
  • If anyone wants to abuse this by creating a language where the empty program prints Hello, World!, then congrats, they just paved the way for a very boring answer.

    Note that there must be an interpreter so the submission can be tested. It is allowed (and even encouraged) to write this interpreter yourself for a previously unimplemented language.

  • Submissions are scored in bytes, in an appropriate (pre-existing) encoding, usually (but not necessarily) UTF-8. Some languages, like Folders, are a bit tricky to score - if in doubt, please ask on Meta.
  • This is not about finding the language with the shortest "Hello, World!" program. This is about finding the shortest "Hello, World!" program in every language. Therefore, I will not mark any answer as "accepted".
  • If your language of choice is a trivial variant of another (potentially more popular) language which already has an answer (think BASIC or SQL dialects, Unix shells or trivial Brainfuck-derivatives like Alphuck), consider adding a note to the existing answer that the same or a very similar solution is also the shortest in the other language.

As a side note, please don't downvote boring (but valid) answers in languages where there is not much to golf - these are still useful to this question as it tries to compile a catalogue as complete as possible. However, do primarily upvote answers in languages where the authors actually had to put effort into golfing the code.

For inspiration, check the Hello World Collection.

The Catalogue

The Stack Snippet at the bottom of this post generates the catalogue from the answers a) as a list of shortest solution per language and b) as an overall leaderboard.

To make sure that your answer shows up, please start your answer with a headline, using the following Markdown template:

## Language Name, N bytes

where N is the size of your submission. If you improve your score, you can keep old scores in the headline, by striking them through. For instance:

## Ruby, <s>104</s> <s>101</s> 96 bytes

If there you want to include multiple numbers in your header (e.g. because your score is the sum of two files or you want to list interpreter flag penalties separately), make sure that the actual score is the last number in the header:

## Perl, 43 + 2 (-p flag) = 45 bytes

You can also make the language name a link which will then show up in the snippet:

## [><>](https://esolangs.org/wiki/Fish), 121 bytes

/* Configuration */

var QUESTION_ID = 55422; // Obtain this from the url
// It will be like https://XYZ.stackexchange.com/questions/QUESTION_ID/... on any question page
var ANSWER_FILTER = "!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe";
var COMMENT_FILTER = "!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk";
var OVERRIDE_USER = 8478; // This should be the user ID of the challenge author.

/* App */

var answers = [], answers_hash, answer_ids, answer_page = 1, more_answers = true, comment_page;

function answersUrl(index) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/" +  QUESTION_ID + "/answers?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + ANSWER_FILTER;
}

function commentUrl(index, answers) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/" + answers.join(';') + "/comments?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + COMMENT_FILTER;
}

function getAnswers() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: answersUrl(answer_page++),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      answers.push.apply(answers, data.items);
      answers_hash = [];
      answer_ids = [];
      data.items.forEach(function(a) {
        a.comments = [];
        var id = +a.share_link.match(/\d+/);
        answer_ids.push(id);
        answers_hash[id] = a;
      });
      if (!data.has_more) more_answers = false;
      comment_page = 1;
      getComments();
    }
  });
}

function getComments() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: commentUrl(comment_page++, answer_ids),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      data.items.forEach(function(c) {
        if (c.owner.user_id === OVERRIDE_USER)
          answers_hash[c.post_id].comments.push(c);
      });
      if (data.has_more) getComments();
      else if (more_answers) getAnswers();
      else process();
    }
  });  
}

getAnswers();

var SCORE_REG = /<h\d>\s*([^\n,<]*(?:<(?:[^\n>]*>[^\n<]*<\/[^\n>]*>)[^\n,<]*)*),.*?(\d+)(?=[^\n\d<>]*(?:<(?:s>[^\n<>]*<\/s>|[^\n<>]+>)[^\n\d<>]*)*<\/h\d>)/;

var OVERRIDE_REG = /^Override\s*header:\s*/i;

function getAuthorName(a) {
  return a.owner.display_name;
}

function process() {
  var valid = [];
  
  answers.forEach(function(a) {
    var body = a.body;
    a.comments.forEach(function(c) {
      if(OVERRIDE_REG.test(c.body))
        body = '<h1>' + c.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG, '') + '</h1>';
    });
    
    var match = body.match(SCORE_REG);
    if (match)
      valid.push({
        user: getAuthorName(a),
        size: +match[2],
        language: match[1],
        link: a.share_link,
      });
    else console.log(body);
  });
  
  valid.sort(function (a, b) {
    var aB = a.size,
        bB = b.size;
    return aB - bB
  });

  var languages = {};
  var place = 1;
  var lastSize = null;
  var lastPlace = 1;
  valid.forEach(function (a) {
    if (a.size != lastSize)
      lastPlace = place;
    lastSize = a.size;
    ++place;
    
    var answer = jQuery("#answer-template").html();
    answer = answer.replace("{{PLACE}}", lastPlace + ".")
                   .replace("{{NAME}}", a.user)
                   .replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", a.language)
                   .replace("{{SIZE}}", a.size)
                   .replace("{{LINK}}", a.link);
    answer = jQuery(answer);
    jQuery("#answers").append(answer);

    var lang = a.language;
    lang = jQuery('<a>'+lang+'</a>').text();
    
    languages[lang] = languages[lang] || {lang: a.language, lang_raw: lang, user: a.user, size: a.size, link: a.link};
  });

  var langs = [];
  for (var lang in languages)
    if (languages.hasOwnProperty(lang))
      langs.push(languages[lang]);

  langs.sort(function (a, b) {
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() > b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return 1;
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() < b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return -1;
    return 0;
  });

  for (var i = 0; i < langs.length; ++i)
  {
    var language = jQuery("#language-template").html();
    var lang = langs[i];
    language = language.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", lang.lang)
                       .replace("{{NAME}}", lang.user)
                       .replace("{{SIZE}}", lang.size)
                       .replace("{{LINK}}", lang.link);
    language = jQuery(language);
    jQuery("#languages").append(language);
  }

}
body {
  text-align: left !important;
  display: block !important;
}

#answer-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 290px;
  float: left;
}

#language-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 500px;
  float: left;
}

table thead {
  font-weight: bold;
}

table td {
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/codegolf/all.css?v=ffb5d0584c5f">
<div id="language-list">
  <h2>Shortest Solution by Language</h2>
  <table class="language-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="languages">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<div id="answer-list">
  <h2>Leaderboard</h2>
  <table class="answer-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="answers">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="answer-template">
    <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="language-template">
    <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

\$\endgroup\$
21
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @isaacg No it doesn't. I think there would be some interesting languages where it's not obvious whether primality testing is possible. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 28 '15 at 13:56
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ If the same program, such as "Hello, World!", is the shortest in many different and unrelated languages, should it be posted separately? \$\endgroup\$ – aditsu quit because SE is EVIL Aug 28 '15 at 15:33
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007 Well it's hidden by default because the three code blocks take up a lot of space. I could minify them so that they are a single line each, but I'd rather keep the code maintainable in case bugs come up. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 28 '15 at 19:34
  • 8
    \$\begingroup\$ @ETHproductions "Unlike our usual rules, feel free to use a language (or language version) even if it's newer than this challenge." Publishing the language and an implementation before posting it would definitely be helpful though. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Aug 29 '15 at 23:01
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @MartinEnder ... Almost. If two BF solutions have the same size, the one with smaller lexicographical order will take smaller number of bytes in Unary. Of course the smallest Unary solution translated to BF is guaranteed to be smallest. \$\endgroup\$ – user202729 May 20 '18 at 10:20

831 Answers 831

1
15 16
17
18 19
28
2
\$\begingroup\$

Taktentus, 22 bytes

@WY _= "Hello, World!"

I believe this is the shortest it can get. I would like to be proven wrong.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ The code in your link has a # after the @WY which isn't in your code? Also, this is 22 bytes, not 21 \$\endgroup\$ – caird coinheringaahing Nov 9 '20 at 16:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ That is the default code. Replace it with the code in my link. \$\endgroup\$ – Asher I Nov 9 '20 at 16:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ You’re right. I counted wrong, fixed. \$\endgroup\$ – Asher I Nov 9 '20 at 16:45
2
\$\begingroup\$

Befalse, 43 30 bytes

"!dlroW ,o"\
/?$\!"Hell"/
\. /

If this gets down to 1 line, it would be much shorter without all the spaces on the second line. I’ll golf this further.

Thanks to Jo King♦ for golfing this further. I think it can be golfed even more now.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't know much about Befalse, but you can do fold it back along the second line for 30 bytes or use the call and return commands for 31 bytes \$\endgroup\$ – Jo King Nov 10 '20 at 3:31
2
\$\begingroup\$

Shu, 931 bytes

IncreaseBy100 DecreaseBy10 DecreaseBy10 DecreaseBy10 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 IncreaseBy10 DecreaseBy1 DecreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 IncreaseBy10 DecreaseBy1 DecreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 DecreaseBy10 DecreaseBy1 DecreaseBy1 DecreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 IncreaseBy10 DecreaseBy1 DecreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy100 PrintChar Clear IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy10 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 IncreaseBy1 PrintChar Clear
\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site! Seems like an interesting language, I'll be interested to see more examples when you finish them. \$\endgroup\$ – Redwolf Programs Nov 12 '20 at 21:20
2
\$\begingroup\$

Source Engine Console, 18 bytes

echo Hello, World!

You can't try it online unless Valve ports Half-Life 2 to WASM or something.

This script is pretty basic. It's perfectly valid to echo like this without quotes in the Source Engine.

The Source Engine is a game engine developed by Valve Software, and used in all their games after 2004 (until DOTA 2 in 2015). It provides basic scripting through console commands. You can test this by opening the developer console (enable in settings and press the ` key) and pasting the line.

Tested in Team Fortress 2, CS:GO and Source SDK Base 2013 (Multiplayer).

By inspecting some leftover E3 demo scripts in Half-Life 2, it's revealed there was a rem command which could be a shorter 17 bytes, but this is no longer present in the engine (and I assume that a rem doesn't count because it doesn't print anything). I've yet to test if it exists in Source 2004, but can confirm it's missing in Source 2013.

Technically, the console isn't STDOUT, however the only way to really output to STDOUT is by using the SDK to make a game of my own (obviously compiling to a very large size).

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

!@#$%^&*()_+, 17 bytes

 ^dlroW ,olleH(@)

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Pxem, 15 bytes (filename) + 0 byte (contents) = 15 bytes

Filename

Hello, World!.p

Content

(none)

Description of program

The program above should output the phrase without LF. If you'd like LF, here is an alternative filename (19 bytes);

ak.-Hello, World!.p

Description of language

The main feature of this programming language to recognize filename as main routine of the program; content of the file is subroutine.

Implementations

So far there are two major implementations:

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site! Nice first answer, this looks like an interesting language. \$\endgroup\$ – Redwolf Programs Jan 14 at 13:42
2
\$\begingroup\$

Python3, 9 Bytes

import qz

Try online

It's kind of cheating because it's using an external package but I don't think there is another way to pass the boring:

print("Hello, World!")
\$\endgroup\$
3
  • \$\begingroup\$ The first one may be valid, but the second one has almost certainly been done already. Also, it's recommended to link to an online interpreter. I'd suggest TIO, it can even generate markdown for you. Here's an example link \$\endgroup\$ – user Jan 28 at 21:54
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @user Duplicate answers are allowed. But even were they not, there's clearly been some effort here to post an alternative to the most obvious approach. \$\endgroup\$ – Dingus Jan 28 at 22:21
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @user Link doesn't work since the module qz isn't installed there, and can't be because of TIO's heavy restrictions :) \$\endgroup\$ – Makonede Apr 13 at 19:39
2
\$\begingroup\$

Arturo, 20 bytes

print"Hello, World!"
\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Vyxal, 8 bytes

`ƈṡ, ƛ€!

Try it Online!

Simply the compressed string Hello, World!

Alternatively,

Vyxal, 2 bytes

kH

Pushes the constant Hello, World!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ It reads: 1/2 V, 1/2 v! \$\endgroup\$ – null Aug 29 '20 at 8:01
2
\$\begingroup\$

Pinecone, 22 bytes

print: "Hello, World!"
\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

REXX, 18 bytes

say"Hello, World!"

Rexx is widely used as a scripting and macro language, and is often used for processing data and text and generating reports. Rexx is the primary scripting language in some operating systems, e.g. OS/2, MVS, VM, AmigaOS, and is also used as an internal macro language in some other software, such as KEDIT, THE and the ZOC terminal emulator.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, it's used on zOS \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Feb 24 '16 at 19:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can remove the space between the say command and the string, meaning say"Hello, World!" works. \$\endgroup\$ – cnamejj Apr 20 at 22:29
2
\$\begingroup\$

1L_a, 3549 2532 bytes

 **********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
 **   *   **    * **       *   *  *  *   **      * *   *    **  * *     *      **  *** *    *  *  *    **      **  *** **    *  *  * ***    **   *       *  **     *  ** *       **  *** *    *  *  *     **       *** *   *   *  *  * *    *  * *   *   *    *   **      *    ** ***   *       *  **  * *     *  **     *  ** *       * *    **  **   * *    *  **  * *  *      *  **  * *   *   *   **  **   *  * *      *  *  *    *
 *       * *  * *     * *    * *  **     **  *   *          *  *      * *  **       *  *  * *  **   **     **       *  *     ** **   *   *  *        *      *   **    *     ***       *  *  * *  **   * *    ***   **  *     * *  **   *       *         *      *     ***   **     *        *      *  *      * *      **    *     **   *   **     *      *       *   *** **    * *      *         *       *       *     ** *  **   **
    ***    *       *    **  *     *    *     **      *        *    **      *    *     **       *    *   *  *    *     **        *    ** **      ***  ** **    * *        *   *    *     **       *    *    *   **      **         *    **   *     * **   **   *    ** *     *   *      ***  ** **    *    **       ** *        *   **      *   *      *  **   *    *      **         *     * **   **   *      **  ** * **     *    *  *
***   **     *  *  *   **   *  *    *     *  *    *     **  *   **  *  **  ** *******    *  *    *  *****  ** * *****    **  *    *     ******  ***  *   *****  *     *  *   ** * *****    *  *    *  **  **   *    *       *  *    *      *****    ***      **    *  *  *  *********  ***  *   ****   **  *  ***  *  *     *  *   *    *  *********  *      *****     *      *  *** ****    ***       *****  **     *  *  *    *  ***
 **********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Try it online! (heh, line wrapping makes it look wierd)

Automatically generated by this program, with some golfing (manual + golf.rb).

It is very hard to program in 1L_a, so I use generator. Generator creates cells, each cell prints one bit. It iterates through all possible cells with height 6 and no more than 5 inner asterisks to find a cell that prints the needed bit. Generator fails if height is less than 6 or max asterisk count is less than 5.

This is an ungolfed version with cells visible (13*8 = 104 cells):

  ****** ****** ****** ***** ****** ****** **** **** ****** ***** **** ****** ***** ***** ****** **** ****** ******* ***** ****** ***** **** ****** **** ****** ***** **** ****** ***** **** ******* **** ****** ***** **** ****** ***** ***** **** ***** ******* ***** ***** ****** ***** **** ****** **** ****** ****** ***** ****** **** ******* **** **** ****** ****** **** ******* ***** ****** ****** **** ******* ***** **** ****** ***** ***** **** **** ****** ******* ***** **** ******* ***** ***** ****** ***** ***** ***** ****** **** ****** **** ******* ***** ****** **** ***** **** ******* ***** ****** **** ****** **** ******* **** **** ****** *****
  **   * *   ** *    * * * * *         *      * *  * *  *      ** *        ** * *      ** *    * ** * * * ** *     * *         ** *  ** ** * *    * *  * *  *      ** *        ** *  ** ** * **    * *  * *  * * ***      * **   * *         * *  * **       *  * ** ** *         ** *  ** ** * *    * *  * *  *       ** *         ** ** * *   *      * *  * *  * * *    * *  * * *   * *   * *    * *   ** *        *      ** * ** **   * *         * *  * ** * * * ** *     * *  ** *       *  * ** ** *         ** * *      ** *  ** **   * ** * *    * *  * **  * * *  ** *         * *  ** *  * * *   * *   * *   ** *  * **   * *  * * *        * *  * *  *      **
  *         * * *  * * *        * * *    * ** * *  * **   * *  ** *  * *   ** *   * *          * *  * **         * * *   * **         * *  * *  * * *  * **   * **       * **         * *  * *     * ** * **   * *   * *  * *          * *        * *   * **    * *        ** **         * *  * *  * * *  * **   * * *      *** *   ** *  * *     * ** * *  * **   * *         * *           * *        *       * ***   * **       * *          * *        * *  * **         * * *        * **    * *        ** *   ** *   * **       ** *         * *         * *   *** * * * *    * ** * *        * *           * *         * *         * *     * ** * *  * **   * **   
     *** *    * *         ** *    * **  ** *       * *    * **       * **         * **  * *        ** *    * ***        ** *    * *       ** *         * *    * *   * *  * *    * *       ** *          * *    * ** ** *        ** **  * ** ** *      * * *          ** *   * *    * *       ** *         * *    * *    * *   * **        * **    * *       * *    * **   * *       * ** *   * **   * *    * ** * *     * *   * *        ** **  * ** ** *      ** *    * ***         * ** * *          ** *   * **         * *   * *         ** *  * **   * *      *        ** **   * *        * *       * ** *   * **   * *        ** *  * ** * ** *       * *    * *   *
* **   * **       *  * *  ** *   ** *   ** *  * *      *  * *   * *  * *    * **  * *   * ***  * *      ** * * *  ** *  ** ** *** ***** *      *  * *      *  * ***** *  * ** * * ***** *      **  * *      *       ** **** **  ** **  * *   * **** **  * *     * *  ** *   * ** * * ***** *      *  * *      *  * **  ** *   * *    * *         ** *  * *      *        ** **** *    ** **        ** *    * *  * *  *  * ***** **** **  ** **  * *   * **** *      ** * * *  ** **  * *  * *     * *  ** *   * *    * **  * ***** *** * **  ** *        ** **** *     * *         ** *  * *** * **** *    ** **         * **** **  ** *       *  * *  * *      *  * *****
  ****** ****** ****** ***** ****** ****** **** **** ****** ***** **** ****** ***** ***** ****** **** ****** ******* ***** ****** ***** **** ****** **** ****** ***** **** ****** ***** **** ******* **** ****** ***** **** ****** ***** ***** **** ***** ******* ***** ***** ****** ***** **** ****** **** ****** ****** ***** ****** **** ******* **** **** ****** ****** **** ******* ***** ****** ****** **** ******* ***** **** ****** ***** ***** **** **** ****** ******* ***** **** ******* ***** ***** ****** ***** ***** ***** ****** **** ****** **** ******* ***** ****** **** ***** **** ******* ***** ****** **** ****** **** ******* **** **** ****** *****

See also 1L_a answer to "Add a language to a polyglot" challenge.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Flurry -bnn, 710 bytes

(){}[(){}[(){}[(){}[(){}[(){}[(){}[(){}(<[{<({}){}>}{<({})({}){}>}][{<({})({}){}>}{<({}){}>}]>)((((<><<>()>[{<({}){}>}<{<({}){}>}{<({})({})({})({}){}>}>])[<><<>()>]{<({})({})({})({})({})({}){}>}))[<><<>()>]{<({})({}){}>})](<{<({})({})({}){}>}[<><<>()><{<({}){}>}{<({})({})({})({}){}>}>]>)]({<({})({})({})({}){}>}{<({}){}>})](<{<({})({}){}>}[<><<>()><{<({})({})({}){}>}{<({})({})({})({})({})({}){}>}>]>)](([{<({}){}>}<{<({}){}>}{<({})({})({})({}){}>}>][<><<>()>][<><<>()>[<{<({}){}>}{<({})({})({})({}){}>}>]])[<><<>()>]{<({})({}){}>})]([{<({}){}>}<{<({}){}>}{<({})({})({})({}){}>}>][<><<>()>][{<({})({}){}>}{<({}){}>}])]({<({}){}>}<{<({}){}>}{<({})({})({})({}){}>}>)](<><<>()>[{<({})({})({})({}){}>}{<({}){}>}])

Try it on the online Flurry interpreter!

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Snap!, 34 bytes

enter image description here

when gf clicked
say[Hello, World!]

Easiest program I've written in my life

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does snap allow unmatched brackets - say[Hello, world!? \$\endgroup\$ – A username 2 days ago
1
\$\begingroup\$

C++, 59 bytes

#include <iostream>
int main(){std::cout<<"Hello, World!";}
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6
  • \$\begingroup\$ Isn't the newline optional? \$\endgroup\$ – jrich Aug 28 '15 at 14:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ @UndefinedFunction try it. It will not work without a new line \$\endgroup\$ – galexite Aug 28 '15 at 17:36
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Isn't printf smaller? #include <cstdio>? \$\endgroup\$ – galexite Aug 28 '15 at 17:37
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @georgeunix My comment referred to a previous version, in which it read cout<<"Hello, World!\n". The \n was removed, since a newline was not required after the output. \$\endgroup\$ – jrich Aug 28 '15 at 17:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh OK, sorry for that @UndefinedFunction \$\endgroup\$ – galexite Aug 28 '15 at 17:39
1
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Stackstack, 20 Bytes

This is a stack-based language not focused on golfing! Looks similar to Forth, and was made two years ago.

"Hello, World!"print
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1
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STATA, 17 bytes

di"Hello, World!"
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1
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Algoid, 28 bytes

text.output("Hello, World!")

Now that's just boring in such a fun language... Here's a slightly longer version, let's get some colours going for 104 bytes:

algo.hide()
algo.setColor(algo.color.GREEN)
algo.setBgColor(algo.color.DARK_RED)
algo.text("Hello, World!")

See the output here

Okay I've finished for the day now :)

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0
1
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Enema, 21 bytes

"!dlroW ,olleH"[DZBO]

How it works

"!dlroW ,olleH" Push those characters (including a null byte) on the stack.
[               Infinite loop:
  D               Duplicate the topmost element on the stack.
  Z               If it is non-zero, skip the next instruction.
    B             Break out of the loop.
  O             Output as a character.
]
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1
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dc, 16 bytes

[Hello, World!]p

I can't think of any way to get this one shorter.

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1
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Element, 17 bytes

Hello\,\ World\!`

The ` outputs the string, while the \s are used to escape out of other characters.

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1
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FALSE, 15 bytes

"Hello, World!"
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1
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Io, 21 bytes

"Hello, World!" write
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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ This Io (TIO) seems to have print, but not write. Is this another language with the same name? \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Feb 11 '18 at 15:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Dennis It appears to have write, but it appears to write to some mysterious location/file/somewhere else instead of STDOUT \$\endgroup\$ – ASCII-only Apr 13 '18 at 8:35
1
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Objective-C, 30 bytes

main(){puts("Hello, World!");}
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1
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Ada (GNAT), 54 bytes

procedure gnat.io.a is begin put("Hello, World!");end;

This trick is from anarchy golf: by defining your program in the GNAT.IO namespace, you have access to the put function, which is shorter than the usual way to print strings.

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1
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Curry, 26 bytes

main=putStr"Hello, World!"
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1
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Clojure, 22 bytes

(print"Hello, World!")
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0
1
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K, 18 bytes

`0:"Hello, World!"
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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think you should try for every letter in the alphabet ;) \$\endgroup\$ – Beta Decay Aug 28 '15 at 18:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ In some versions of K, you can just use "Hello, World!" as the entire program. I can't recall, but I believe it's either official K2 (NOT Kona, which doesn't print it; I think it's a K3 thing) or the official K5 (not sure about oK, though). \$\endgroup\$ – kirbyfan64sos Sep 2 '15 at 2:28
1
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Frink, 23 bytes

println["Hello, World"]

I only know of this through my searches for programming apps in the Play Store.

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1
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Betterave, 16 bytes

$"Hello, World!"

Betterave is unusual in that it has the whole "one character = one command" thing going on that many esolangs have, but it uses prefix notation, and the program is one big expression à la Scheme, as opposed to being tape- or stack-based. Here, $"Hello, World!" is just like a function call to print.

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