518
\$\begingroup\$

So... uh... this is a bit embarrassing. But we don't have a plain "Hello, World!" challenge yet (despite having 35 variants tagged with , and counting). While this is not the most interesting code golf in the common languages, finding the shortest solution in certain esolangs can be a serious challenge. For instance, to my knowledge it is not known whether the shortest possible Brainfuck solution has been found yet.

Furthermore, while all of Wikipedia (the Wikipedia entry has been deleted but there is a copy at archive.org ), esolangs and Rosetta Code have lists of "Hello, World!" programs, none of these are interested in having the shortest for each language (there is also this GitHub repository). If we want to be a significant site in the code golf community, I think we should try and create the ultimate catalogue of shortest "Hello, World!" programs (similar to how our basic quine challenge contains some of the shortest known quines in various languages). So let's do this!

The Rules

  • Each submission must be a full program.
  • The program must take no input, and print Hello, World! to STDOUT (this exact byte stream, including capitalization and punctuation) plus an optional trailing newline, and nothing else.
  • The program must not write anything to STDERR.
  • If anyone wants to abuse this by creating a language where the empty program prints Hello, World!, then congrats, they just paved the way for a very boring answer.

    Note that there must be an interpreter so the submission can be tested. It is allowed (and even encouraged) to write this interpreter yourself for a previously unimplemented language.

  • Submissions are scored in bytes, in an appropriate (pre-existing) encoding, usually (but not necessarily) UTF-8. Some languages, like Folders, are a bit tricky to score - if in doubt, please ask on Meta.
  • This is not about finding the language with the shortest "Hello, World!" program. This is about finding the shortest "Hello, World!" program in every language. Therefore, I will not mark any answer as "accepted".
  • If your language of choice is a trivial variant of another (potentially more popular) language which already has an answer (think BASIC or SQL dialects, Unix shells or trivial Brainfuck-derivatives like Alphuck), consider adding a note to the existing answer that the same or a very similar solution is also the shortest in the other language.

As a side note, please don't downvote boring (but valid) answers in languages where there is not much to golf - these are still useful to this question as it tries to compile a catalogue as complete as possible. However, do primarily upvote answers in languages where the authors actually had to put effort into golfing the code.

For inspiration, check the Hello World Collection.

The Catalogue

The Stack Snippet at the bottom of this post generates the catalogue from the answers a) as a list of shortest solution per language and b) as an overall leaderboard.

To make sure that your answer shows up, please start your answer with a headline, using the following Markdown template:

## Language Name, N bytes

where N is the size of your submission. If you improve your score, you can keep old scores in the headline, by striking them through. For instance:

## Ruby, <s>104</s> <s>101</s> 96 bytes

If there you want to include multiple numbers in your header (e.g. because your score is the sum of two files or you want to list interpreter flag penalties separately), make sure that the actual score is the last number in the header:

## Perl, 43 + 2 (-p flag) = 45 bytes

You can also make the language name a link which will then show up in the snippet:

## [><>](https://esolangs.org/wiki/Fish), 121 bytes

/* Configuration */

var QUESTION_ID = 55422; // Obtain this from the url
// It will be like https://XYZ.stackexchange.com/questions/QUESTION_ID/... on any question page
var ANSWER_FILTER = "!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe";
var COMMENT_FILTER = "!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk";
var OVERRIDE_USER = 8478; // This should be the user ID of the challenge author.

/* App */

var answers = [], answers_hash, answer_ids, answer_page = 1, more_answers = true, comment_page;

function answersUrl(index) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/" +  QUESTION_ID + "/answers?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + ANSWER_FILTER;
}

function commentUrl(index, answers) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/" + answers.join(';') + "/comments?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + COMMENT_FILTER;
}

function getAnswers() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: answersUrl(answer_page++),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      answers.push.apply(answers, data.items);
      answers_hash = [];
      answer_ids = [];
      data.items.forEach(function(a) {
        a.comments = [];
        var id = +a.share_link.match(/\d+/);
        answer_ids.push(id);
        answers_hash[id] = a;
      });
      if (!data.has_more) more_answers = false;
      comment_page = 1;
      getComments();
    }
  });
}

function getComments() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: commentUrl(comment_page++, answer_ids),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      data.items.forEach(function(c) {
        if (c.owner.user_id === OVERRIDE_USER)
          answers_hash[c.post_id].comments.push(c);
      });
      if (data.has_more) getComments();
      else if (more_answers) getAnswers();
      else process();
    }
  });  
}

getAnswers();

var SCORE_REG = /<h\d>\s*([^\n,<]*(?:<(?:[^\n>]*>[^\n<]*<\/[^\n>]*>)[^\n,<]*)*),.*?(\d+)(?=[^\n\d<>]*(?:<(?:s>[^\n<>]*<\/s>|[^\n<>]+>)[^\n\d<>]*)*<\/h\d>)/;

var OVERRIDE_REG = /^Override\s*header:\s*/i;

function getAuthorName(a) {
  return a.owner.display_name;
}

function process() {
  var valid = [];
  
  answers.forEach(function(a) {
    var body = a.body;
    a.comments.forEach(function(c) {
      if(OVERRIDE_REG.test(c.body))
        body = '<h1>' + c.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG, '') + '</h1>';
    });
    
    var match = body.match(SCORE_REG);
    if (match)
      valid.push({
        user: getAuthorName(a),
        size: +match[2],
        language: match[1],
        link: a.share_link,
      });
    else console.log(body);
  });
  
  valid.sort(function (a, b) {
    var aB = a.size,
        bB = b.size;
    return aB - bB
  });

  var languages = {};
  var place = 1;
  var lastSize = null;
  var lastPlace = 1;
  valid.forEach(function (a) {
    if (a.size != lastSize)
      lastPlace = place;
    lastSize = a.size;
    ++place;
    
    var answer = jQuery("#answer-template").html();
    answer = answer.replace("{{PLACE}}", lastPlace + ".")
                   .replace("{{NAME}}", a.user)
                   .replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", a.language)
                   .replace("{{SIZE}}", a.size)
                   .replace("{{LINK}}", a.link);
    answer = jQuery(answer);
    jQuery("#answers").append(answer);

    var lang = a.language;
    lang = jQuery('<a>'+lang+'</a>').text();
    
    languages[lang] = languages[lang] || {lang: a.language, lang_raw: lang, user: a.user, size: a.size, link: a.link};
  });

  var langs = [];
  for (var lang in languages)
    if (languages.hasOwnProperty(lang))
      langs.push(languages[lang]);

  langs.sort(function (a, b) {
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() > b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return 1;
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() < b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return -1;
    return 0;
  });

  for (var i = 0; i < langs.length; ++i)
  {
    var language = jQuery("#language-template").html();
    var lang = langs[i];
    language = language.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", lang.lang)
                       .replace("{{NAME}}", lang.user)
                       .replace("{{SIZE}}", lang.size)
                       .replace("{{LINK}}", lang.link);
    language = jQuery(language);
    jQuery("#languages").append(language);
  }

}
body {
  text-align: left !important;
  display: block !important;
}

#answer-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 290px;
  float: left;
}

#language-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 500px;
  float: left;
}

table thead {
  font-weight: bold;
}

table td {
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/codegolf/all.css?v=ffb5d0584c5f">
<div id="language-list">
  <h2>Shortest Solution by Language</h2>
  <table class="language-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="languages">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<div id="answer-list">
  <h2>Leaderboard</h2>
  <table class="answer-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="answers">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="answer-template">
    <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="language-template">
    <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

\$\endgroup\$
21
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ @isaacg No it doesn't. I think there would be some interesting languages where it's not obvious whether primality testing is possible. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 28, 2015 at 13:56
  • 7
    \$\begingroup\$ If the same program, such as "Hello, World!", is the shortest in many different and unrelated languages, should it be posted separately? \$\endgroup\$ Aug 28, 2015 at 15:33
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007 Well it's hidden by default because the three code blocks take up a lot of space. I could minify them so that they are a single line each, but I'd rather keep the code maintainable in case bugs come up. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 28, 2015 at 19:34
  • 8
    \$\begingroup\$ @ETHproductions "Unlike our usual rules, feel free to use a language (or language version) even if it's newer than this challenge." Publishing the language and an implementation before posting it would definitely be helpful though. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 29, 2015 at 23:01
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @MartinEnder ... Almost. If two BF solutions have the same size, the one with smaller lexicographical order will take smaller number of bytes in Unary. Of course the smallest Unary solution translated to BF is guaranteed to be smallest. \$\endgroup\$
    – DELETE_ME
    May 20, 2018 at 10:20

981 Answers 981

1
\$\begingroup\$

Koka, 31 bytes

fun main()print("Hello world!")

Attempt This Online!

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • \$\begingroup\$ I thought the name of the language was "koala" for a moment! \$\endgroup\$ Jul 11, 2023 at 7:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Iamkindofalanguagedev This one? \$\endgroup\$
    – alephalpha
    Jul 11, 2023 at 7:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ I did not even know that there was a language with that name. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 11, 2023 at 7:50
1
\$\begingroup\$

m68k machine language, 42 40 36 bytes, tested on SunOS 4.1.4

0x00 4878000d pea 13            ; push length of string to stack
0x04 610e     bsr 0x14          ; push address of string to stack
0x06 48656c6c "Hello, World!\0" ; string
0x0a 6f2c2057
0x0e 6f726c64
0x12 2100
0x14 48780001 pea 1             ; push fd=1 "stdout" to stack
0x18 48780001 pea 1             ; push extra stack slot
0x1c 48780004 pea 4             ; select "write()" syscall
0x20 4e40     trap #0           ; call "write()"
0x22 4e40     trap #0           ; call "exit()"
                                ; write() leaves 1 on stack which is
                                ; used to select exit() syscall.

SunOS appears to be fairly permissive when it comes to arguments of the trap instruction on m68k so this may (untested) work unmodified on NetBSD for m68k.

To try it out, compile and run the following C program.

int main[]={0x4878000d,0x610e4865,0x6c6c6f2c,0x20576f72,
0x6c642100,0x48780001,0x48780001,0x48780004,0x4e404e40};
\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

{,}, 2279 Chars or \$2279\log_{256}(4)\approx\$ 569.75 Bytes

({(())},()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()(),()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()()())

Completely ungolfed (for now)

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

{High}, 16 bytes

"Hello, World!";

Two new languages at once!

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

PDP-11 machine language on BSD 2.11, 37 34 bytes

00: 15ce 000d mov $15,(sp) ; len of string on stack
04: 09f7 000e jsr pc, 26   ; addr of string on stack
10: 6548 6c6c              ; "Hello, World!"
    2c6f 5720
    726f 646c
    0021
26: 15e6 0001 mov $1,-(sp) ; stdout on stack
32: 15e6 0001 mov $1,-(sp) ; stack padding
36: 8904      trap 4       ; write() syscall
40: 8901      trap 1       ; exit() syscall

Note that 2BSD does not use the same syscall convention as AT&T UNIXes for the PDP-11. As a result, some previous winners of the IOCCC may not work out of the box on 2BSD.

To try this on a real or emulated PDP-11 running BSD 2.x (this won't work on other operating systems), compile and run the following C program.

char main[]={0xce,0x15,0x0d,0x00,0xf7,0x09,0x0e,0x00,'H','e'
,'l','l','o',',',' ','W','o','r','l','d','!',0x00,0xe6,0x15,
0x01,0x00,0xe6,0x15,0x01,0x00,0x04,0x89,0x01,0x89};

PDP-11 machine language on UNIX v7, 36 bytes

00: 15ce 8901 mov $104401,(sp) ; exit()
04: 15e6 000d mov $15,-(sp)    ; len of string
10: 09f7 000e jsr pc, 32       ; addr of string
14: 6548 6c6c                  ; "Hello, World!"
    2c6f 5720
    726f 646c
    0021
32: 15e6 8904 mov $104404,-(sp); write()
36: 15c0 0001 mov $01,r0       ; fd=1
42: 004e      jmp sp           ; jump to stack

AT&T UNIXes for the PDP-11 had a different syscall convention in which some of the arguments are placed right after the trap instruction. Therefore, almost every syscall requires some self modifying code! The approach here is to generate a "Hello, World!" program on the stack and then jump to the stack.

To try this on a real or emulated PDP-11 running AT&T UNIX, compile and run this C program (if the compiler is very old, remove the =).

char main[]={0xce,0x15,0x01,0x89,0xe6,0x15,0x0d,0x00,0xf7,0x09
,0x0e,0x00,'H','e','l','l','o',',',' ','W','o','r','l','d','!'
,0x00,0xe6,0x15,0x04,0x89,0xc0,0x15,0x01,0x00,0x4e,0x00};
\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Noulith, 15 bytes

"Hello, World!"

Implicitly outputs the string.

https://betaveros.github.io/noulith/#IkhlbGxvLCBXb3JsZCEi

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

MetaBrainfuck -x, (22 bytes)

"Hello, World!"{{+}.>}

Explanation

"Hello, World!"{     }     # for each character in the string "Hello, World!"
                {+}.>      # repeat + that many times, then append .>

expands to the following Brainfuck program:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>

which when executed (-x flag) prints Hello, World!

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1
\$\begingroup\$

WE32k machine language on AT&T UNIX System V, 37 34 bytes

00:  84 4c 4a             MOVW  %sp,%ap     ; set argument pointer for upcoming sycall
03:  a0 01                PUSHW &0x1        ; push file descriptor = 1 to stack
05:  37 0f                BSBB  0xf <0x14>  ; push address of string to stack
07:  48 65 6c 6c 6f 2c 20                   ; "Hello, World!"    
0f:  57 6f 72 6c 64 21
14:  a0 0d                PUSHW &0xd        ; push length of string to stack
16:  84 20 41             MOVW  &0x20,%r1   ; select write()
19:  84 04 40             MOVW  &0x4,%r0    ; configure GATE for syscall
1c:  30 61                GATE              ; syscall
1e:  84 08 41             MOVW  &0x8,%r1    ; select exit() syscall
21:  7b f8                BRB   -0x8 <0x19> ; goto 0x19

To try this on an emulator or actual AT&T 3B2 hardware, compile and run the following C program.

char main[]={0x84,0x4c,0x4a,0xa0,0x01,0x37,0x0f,
'H','e','l','l','o',',',' ','W','o','r','l','d','!'
,0xa0,0x0d,0x84,0x20,0x41,0x84,0x04,0x40,0x30,0x61
,0x84,0x08,0x41,0x7b,0xf8};
\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ TIL you could write machine code as C by defining main as a char array \$\endgroup\$
    – Someone
    Dec 10, 2023 at 23:00
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Somebody this technique has a somewhat famous history \$\endgroup\$
    – ceilingcat
    Dec 10, 2023 at 23:49
1
\$\begingroup\$

IBM z/Architecture machine language on Linux, 31 bytes

00:   a7 29 00 01         lghi    %r2,1.          # fd=1
04:   c0 30 00 00 00 07   larl    %r3,742 <+0x12> # set address of string
0a:   a7 49 00 0d         lghi    %r4,13          # set length of string
0e:   0a 04               svc     4               # write() syscall
10:   0a 01               svc     1               # exit() syscall
12:   48 65 6c 6c                                 # "Hello, World!"
16:   6f 2c 20 57
1a:   6f 72 6c 64
1e:   21

To try this on an emulator or actual machine, compile and run the following C program.

const char main[] __attribute__((section("rodata")))=
"\xa7\x29\x00\x01\xc0\x30\x00\x00\x00\x07\xa7\x49\x00"
"\x0d\x0a\x04\x0a\x01Hello, World!";

On a 31 bit machine (or 64 bit machine in 31 bit mode) change the lghi instructions to lhi which can be done by clearing the 16th most significant bit (0x29 becomes 0x28; 0x49 becomes 0x48).

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Yoda-Lang, 23 bytes

"Hello, World!" you say

I haven't figured out how to install Yoda-Lang so I can't tell if I can remove any spaces. I'll give another try at installing it soon, since this looks like a genuinely interesting language.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

JSL - JMP Scripting Language, 15 bytes

In this challenge the most difficult part was to check whether JSL had no submissions yet (977 answers on 33 pages) =))

"Hello, World!"

Outputs "Hello, World!" to the console.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ You can search on a challenge page like this: inquestion:this is:a <lang name> (replace <lang name> with your language of choice). Not perfect but works for most challenges and languages. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bubbler
    Apr 21 at 22:53
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Also, I'm pretty sure your code should be "Hello, World!" (with a comma and uppercase W)? \$\endgroup\$
    – Bubbler
    Apr 21 at 22:54
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @Bubbler fixed that and thank you for the tip! \$\endgroup\$ Apr 22 at 6:54
1
\$\begingroup\$

Lazy K, 564 bytes

k(s(si`k(s(sss)(s(ss(ss0))(ss0))))(s(si`k(ss(s(ss0)(ss(ss`ss(ss0))))))(s``s`kski
`s(si`k(s(si(ssi(ss0)))(ssi(ss(ss0)))))(s(si`k(ss(s(sss)(ss(ss`ss(ss0))))))(s(si
`k(ss(ss(s(sss)(s(sss)(ss0))))))(s(si`k(s(ss(ssi(ss0)))(ss0)))(s(si`k(s(si(ss(ss
0)))(ss(ss(ssi(ss(ss0)))))))(s(si`k(ss(s(sss)(ss(ss`ss(ss0))))))(s(si`k(s(si(ss0
))(ss(s(sss)(ss(s(sss)(ss0)))))))(s(si`k(s(si(ssi(ss0)))(ssi(ss(ss0)))))(s(si`k(
s(ss0)(ss(ss`ss(ss0)))))(s(si`k(ss(s(ss(ssi(ss0)))(ss0))))(s`k(si`s`k`si(sii))(s
i`k(ssi(ssi(ss0))))))))))))))))(s(s`ks(s`kk(s`ks(s`k`si(s`kk(si`k(s`ksk)))))))`k
k))
\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

rs, 14 bytes

/Hello, World!

Replaces the empty string with "Hello, World!"

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

WARP, 16 bytes

)"Hello, World!"

) is the standard output mechanism.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

ACIDIC, 16 bytes

Hello, World!
+*

Prints the entire storage stack, which is filled with Hello, World!.

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0
0
\$\begingroup\$

Ans, 16 bytes

$"Hello, World!"

$ is the standard output mechanism.

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0
\$\begingroup\$

J--, 28 bytes

main{echo("Hello, World!");}

main is replaced with public static void main(String[]a), echo is replaced with System.out.println, and the entire program is put in a class.

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0
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A0A0, 57 bytes

P72P87
P101P111
P108P114
P108P108
P111P100
P44P33
P32
G-6

2 commands per line was the densest packing that I could find.

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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ I get Hl,Wrdeo ol! as the output from this... \$\endgroup\$
    – Sp3000
    Sep 28, 2015 at 12:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Sp3000 Should be fixed \$\endgroup\$ Sep 28, 2015 at 20:57
0
\$\begingroup\$

STXTRM, 15 bytes

[Hello, World!]

[...] is the standard output mechanism.

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0
\$\begingroup\$

Argh!, 27 bytes

ppppppppppppp
Hello, World!

Each p prints the character below it.

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0
\$\begingroup\$

AutoIt, 29 bytes

ConsoleWrite("Hello, World!")

Needs to be compiled as a console program.

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1
  • \$\begingroup\$ MsgBox(0,"","Hello, World!") is one shorter :) \$\endgroup\$ May 8, 2019 at 20:37
0
\$\begingroup\$

Foobar and Foobaz and Barbaz, oh my!, 314 bytes

72 and 72 and 0, oh my.
37 and 37 and 64, oh my.
72 and 72 and 36, oh my.
. and 64 and 44, oh my.
67 and 67 and 44, oh my.
. and 44 and 0, oh my.
. and 32 and 0, oh my.
87 and 87 and 0, oh my.
40 and 40 and 71, oh my.
16 and 16 and 98, oh my.
12 and 12 and 96, oh my.
. and 64 and 36, oh my.
1 and 1 and 32, oh my.

I believe that this is an optimal solution, with each line outputting a character.

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0
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Tarflex, 18 bytes

outs Hello, World!

outs is the standard output mechanism.

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0
\$\begingroup\$

SSBPL, 33 bytes

0'!'d'l'r'o'W' ','o'l$'e'H[$][.]#

This pushes the ASCII for "Hello, World!" followed by a 0 onto the stack, then prints the top value while it isn't zero.

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0
\$\begingroup\$

Super Stack!, 66 bytes

0 33 100 108 114 111 87 32 44 111 108 108 101 72 if outputascii fi

Pushes the letters followed by a zero onto the stack, and prints them while they aren't zero.

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0
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Swap, 13 bytes

Hello, World!

Similar to ///, but swaps the terms instead of replacing them.

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0
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ZeptoBasic, 21 bytes

print "Hello, World!"

print is the standard output mechanism.

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0
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EEL, 93 bytes

(Also known as Extensible Esoteric Language)

def(z|-1;x;z)
def(d|c;z)
72
d
101
d
108
c
d
111
d
44
d
32
d
87
d
111
d
114
d
108
d
100
d
33
d

I'm sure this could be golfed quite a lot, but this is something I whipped up pretty quick. All it does is define some helpful functions and use them to display "Hello, World!"

Also, this DOES print "Hello, World!" with the characters separated by newlines, but I can't do anything about that, it's impossible in EEL.

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1
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ its obviously not that extensible if you can't do the challenge... \$\endgroup\$ Jul 16, 2017 at 14:26
0
\$\begingroup\$

~English, 29 bytes

Display "Hello, World!".Stop.
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0
\$\begingroup\$

Wat, 47 + 1 = 48 bytes

0«!dlroW ,olleH»>ó#ÐÑÅv
                ^     <

I post a explanation tomorrow Here is the explanation:

First line:

0«!dlroW ,olleH»>ó#ÐÑÅv

0«!dlroW ,olleH»        Push a reversed null terminated string
                >       Go forward
                 ó      Duplicate the top of stack
                  #     Skip the next instruction
                   Ð    Kill all "execution engines" (end the program)
                    Ñ   If the top of the stack is 0, go backward (execute Ð and end the program), otherwise go forward
                     Å  Print the character on the top of the stack
                      v Go downward
Second line:

                ^     <

Simply loop from the 'v' to the '>'
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