498
\$\begingroup\$

So... uh... this is a bit embarrassing. But we don't have a plain "Hello, World!" challenge yet (despite having 35 variants tagged with , and counting). While this is not the most interesting code golf in the common languages, finding the shortest solution in certain esolangs can be a serious challenge. For instance, to my knowledge it is not known whether the shortest possible Brainfuck solution has been found yet.

Furthermore, while all of Wikipedia (the Wikipedia entry has been deleted but there is a copy at archive.org ), esolangs and Rosetta Code have lists of "Hello, World!" programs, none of these are interested in having the shortest for each language (there is also this GitHub repository). If we want to be a significant site in the code golf community, I think we should try and create the ultimate catalogue of shortest "Hello, World!" programs (similar to how our basic quine challenge contains some of the shortest known quines in various languages). So let's do this!

The Rules

  • Each submission must be a full program.
  • The program must take no input, and print Hello, World! to STDOUT (this exact byte stream, including capitalization and punctuation) plus an optional trailing newline, and nothing else.
  • The program must not write anything to STDERR.
  • If anyone wants to abuse this by creating a language where the empty program prints Hello, World!, then congrats, they just paved the way for a very boring answer.

    Note that there must be an interpreter so the submission can be tested. It is allowed (and even encouraged) to write this interpreter yourself for a previously unimplemented language.

  • Submissions are scored in bytes, in an appropriate (pre-existing) encoding, usually (but not necessarily) UTF-8. Some languages, like Folders, are a bit tricky to score - if in doubt, please ask on Meta.
  • This is not about finding the language with the shortest "Hello, World!" program. This is about finding the shortest "Hello, World!" program in every language. Therefore, I will not mark any answer as "accepted".
  • If your language of choice is a trivial variant of another (potentially more popular) language which already has an answer (think BASIC or SQL dialects, Unix shells or trivial Brainfuck-derivatives like Alphuck), consider adding a note to the existing answer that the same or a very similar solution is also the shortest in the other language.

As a side note, please don't downvote boring (but valid) answers in languages where there is not much to golf - these are still useful to this question as it tries to compile a catalogue as complete as possible. However, do primarily upvote answers in languages where the authors actually had to put effort into golfing the code.

For inspiration, check the Hello World Collection.

The Catalogue

The Stack Snippet at the bottom of this post generates the catalogue from the answers a) as a list of shortest solution per language and b) as an overall leaderboard.

To make sure that your answer shows up, please start your answer with a headline, using the following Markdown template:

## Language Name, N bytes

where N is the size of your submission. If you improve your score, you can keep old scores in the headline, by striking them through. For instance:

## Ruby, <s>104</s> <s>101</s> 96 bytes

If there you want to include multiple numbers in your header (e.g. because your score is the sum of two files or you want to list interpreter flag penalties separately), make sure that the actual score is the last number in the header:

## Perl, 43 + 2 (-p flag) = 45 bytes

You can also make the language name a link which will then show up in the snippet:

## [><>](https://esolangs.org/wiki/Fish), 121 bytes

/* Configuration */

var QUESTION_ID = 55422; // Obtain this from the url
// It will be like https://XYZ.stackexchange.com/questions/QUESTION_ID/... on any question page
var ANSWER_FILTER = "!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe";
var COMMENT_FILTER = "!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk";
var OVERRIDE_USER = 8478; // This should be the user ID of the challenge author.

/* App */

var answers = [], answers_hash, answer_ids, answer_page = 1, more_answers = true, comment_page;

function answersUrl(index) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/" +  QUESTION_ID + "/answers?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + ANSWER_FILTER;
}

function commentUrl(index, answers) {
  return "https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/" + answers.join(';') + "/comments?page=" + index + "&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter=" + COMMENT_FILTER;
}

function getAnswers() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: answersUrl(answer_page++),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      answers.push.apply(answers, data.items);
      answers_hash = [];
      answer_ids = [];
      data.items.forEach(function(a) {
        a.comments = [];
        var id = +a.share_link.match(/\d+/);
        answer_ids.push(id);
        answers_hash[id] = a;
      });
      if (!data.has_more) more_answers = false;
      comment_page = 1;
      getComments();
    }
  });
}

function getComments() {
  jQuery.ajax({
    url: commentUrl(comment_page++, answer_ids),
    method: "get",
    dataType: "jsonp",
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
      data.items.forEach(function(c) {
        if (c.owner.user_id === OVERRIDE_USER)
          answers_hash[c.post_id].comments.push(c);
      });
      if (data.has_more) getComments();
      else if (more_answers) getAnswers();
      else process();
    }
  });  
}

getAnswers();

var SCORE_REG = /<h\d>\s*([^\n,<]*(?:<(?:[^\n>]*>[^\n<]*<\/[^\n>]*>)[^\n,<]*)*),.*?(\d+)(?=[^\n\d<>]*(?:<(?:s>[^\n<>]*<\/s>|[^\n<>]+>)[^\n\d<>]*)*<\/h\d>)/;

var OVERRIDE_REG = /^Override\s*header:\s*/i;

function getAuthorName(a) {
  return a.owner.display_name;
}

function process() {
  var valid = [];
  
  answers.forEach(function(a) {
    var body = a.body;
    a.comments.forEach(function(c) {
      if(OVERRIDE_REG.test(c.body))
        body = '<h1>' + c.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG, '') + '</h1>';
    });
    
    var match = body.match(SCORE_REG);
    if (match)
      valid.push({
        user: getAuthorName(a),
        size: +match[2],
        language: match[1],
        link: a.share_link,
      });
    else console.log(body);
  });
  
  valid.sort(function (a, b) {
    var aB = a.size,
        bB = b.size;
    return aB - bB
  });

  var languages = {};
  var place = 1;
  var lastSize = null;
  var lastPlace = 1;
  valid.forEach(function (a) {
    if (a.size != lastSize)
      lastPlace = place;
    lastSize = a.size;
    ++place;
    
    var answer = jQuery("#answer-template").html();
    answer = answer.replace("{{PLACE}}", lastPlace + ".")
                   .replace("{{NAME}}", a.user)
                   .replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", a.language)
                   .replace("{{SIZE}}", a.size)
                   .replace("{{LINK}}", a.link);
    answer = jQuery(answer);
    jQuery("#answers").append(answer);

    var lang = a.language;
    lang = jQuery('<a>'+lang+'</a>').text();
    
    languages[lang] = languages[lang] || {lang: a.language, lang_raw: lang, user: a.user, size: a.size, link: a.link};
  });

  var langs = [];
  for (var lang in languages)
    if (languages.hasOwnProperty(lang))
      langs.push(languages[lang]);

  langs.sort(function (a, b) {
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() > b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return 1;
    if (a.lang_raw.toLowerCase() < b.lang_raw.toLowerCase()) return -1;
    return 0;
  });

  for (var i = 0; i < langs.length; ++i)
  {
    var language = jQuery("#language-template").html();
    var lang = langs[i];
    language = language.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}", lang.lang)
                       .replace("{{NAME}}", lang.user)
                       .replace("{{SIZE}}", lang.size)
                       .replace("{{LINK}}", lang.link);
    language = jQuery(language);
    jQuery("#languages").append(language);
  }

}
body {
  text-align: left !important;
  display: block !important;
}

#answer-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 290px;
  float: left;
}

#language-list {
  padding: 10px;
  width: 500px;
  float: left;
}

table thead {
  font-weight: bold;
}

table td {
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/codegolf/all.css?v=ffb5d0584c5f">
<div id="language-list">
  <h2>Shortest Solution by Language</h2>
  <table class="language-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="languages">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<div id="answer-list">
  <h2>Leaderboard</h2>
  <table class="answer-list">
    <thead>
      <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="answers">

    </tbody>
  </table>
</div>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="answer-template">
    <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
<table style="display: none">
  <tbody id="language-template">
    <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

\$\endgroup\$
21
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @isaacg No it doesn't. I think there would be some interesting languages where it's not obvious whether primality testing is possible. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 28, 2015 at 13:56
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ If the same program, such as "Hello, World!", is the shortest in many different and unrelated languages, should it be posted separately? \$\endgroup\$ Aug 28, 2015 at 15:33
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007 Well it's hidden by default because the three code blocks take up a lot of space. I could minify them so that they are a single line each, but I'd rather keep the code maintainable in case bugs come up. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 28, 2015 at 19:34
  • 8
    \$\begingroup\$ @ETHproductions "Unlike our usual rules, feel free to use a language (or language version) even if it's newer than this challenge." Publishing the language and an implementation before posting it would definitely be helpful though. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 29, 2015 at 23:01
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @MartinEnder ... Almost. If two BF solutions have the same size, the one with smaller lexicographical order will take smaller number of bytes in Unary. Of course the smallest Unary solution translated to BF is guaranteed to be smallest. \$\endgroup\$
    – DELETE_ME
    May 20, 2018 at 10:20

913 Answers 913

1
17 18
19
20 21
31
2
\$\begingroup\$

51AC8, 2 bytes

Kh

Try it Online!

Finally an online interpreter. A little quirk you have to press Run twice.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Flipbit, 148 134 129 bytes

^>>>^>>>.^<<^<^<<^>>>>>.^<<<^>>>..^<^>.[<]<?>^>^>>.<<^<^>>>.<<<^>>^>^>^.<<<^<^<^>>>>>.[<]?^>>>^>.<<<<?>^>^>>.<<<^>>>.<<<<<?>>>>^.

Try it online!

-14 bytes thanks to Aaron Miller

-5 bytes thanks to Bubbler

How it works

Flipbit uses an infinite tape, consisting of either a 1 or a 0 per cell. The way it outputs is getting all previous elements in the tape, converting that from binary, then indexing into Unicode.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ 134 bytes \$\endgroup\$ Jul 24, 2021 at 4:06
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ 129 using Thanos-oriented programming. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bubbler
    Jul 26, 2021 at 8:21
2
\$\begingroup\$

Arduino, 75 bytes

void setup(){Serial.begin(300);Serial.print("Hello, World!");}void loop(){}

Although Arduino does have println(), the challenge said the newline is optional, and print() is shorter.

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • \$\begingroup\$ 74 bytes (untested) \$\endgroup\$
    – user100411
    Aug 16, 2021 at 4:17
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ If that works, I could make a lot of mine shorter, but I can't test it either -- I can't find my Arduino board. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bbrk24
    Aug 17, 2021 at 22:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @tailsparkrabbitear Just tested it. The compiler says error: 'Serial' does not name a type. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bbrk24
    Aug 20, 2021 at 13:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ Then 82 bytes if I use macro instead. \$\endgroup\$
    – user100411
    Aug 20, 2021 at 23:39
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Yes but that's longer than what I currently have (75 < 82). \$\endgroup\$
    – Bbrk24
    Aug 21, 2021 at 2:32
2
\$\begingroup\$

Minim, 44 43 42 Bytes

New solution uses the Carriage Return escape character '\r', saving 1 more byte:

[]="\r!dlroW ,olleH".$<[[0]--]._^![0].C=0.

Thanks to @stasoid for the incidental? realization!

With whitespace and comments:

[] = "\r!dlroW ,olleH". ; Insert the value 13, and "Hello, World!" backwards, \
                          into memory starting from index 0
$< [[0]--].             ; Prints the value at the index stored at index 0 as unicode, \
                          and decrements index 0
_^ ![0].                ; Skip the next statement if index 0 is 0
C = 0.                  ; Sets the program counter to 0, which advances to 1 afterwards

Previous solutions prepended the string with 13...

[]=13&"!dlroW ,olleH".$<[[0]--]._^![0].C=0.

... or used ASCII escape character 0xD (CR) in the string:

[]="\x0D!dlroW ,olleH".$<[[0]--]._^![0].C=0.

GitHub Repository

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ newline is optional \$\endgroup\$
    – stasoid
    Aug 24, 2021 at 13:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ @stasoid You are correct! That is actually a typo held over from the original solution, where I put the string counter IN the string, but it ended up being shorter to prepend the counter with the '&' operator. Thanks for the catch! That actually means I can make this one byte shorter still! \$\endgroup\$ Aug 27, 2021 at 1:43
2
\$\begingroup\$

Vim, 14 bytes

iHello, World!

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think this is the shortest it can get \$\endgroup\$
    – PyGamer0
    Oct 9, 2021 at 4:17
2
\$\begingroup\$

Logomocja, 20 bytes

pisz [Hello, World!]

Logomocja is the Polish dialect of Logo, pic related shows the effect of executing the command in its environment

owo

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Hello Hell, 0 bytes


Since the tape is initialized to "Hello, World!", and the contents of the tape are printed automatically at the end of execution, the blank program is a Hello World program.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

ErrLess, 17 bytes

SHello, World!S?.

Prints Hello, World! to stdout, without a trailing newline.

ErrLess is a stack-based language I made for fun over the last few months. You can read the docs here, and I also started a tutorial.

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

FROM HERE TO THERE, 27 bytes

FROM "Hello, World!" TO OUT

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript, 101 85 80 bytes

Thanks to @Redwolf Programs for removing 21 bytes

console.log(String.fromCharCode(72,101,108,108,111,44,32,87,111,114,108,100,33))

Try It Online!

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • \$\begingroup\$ But there is shortest JavaScrpit answer. we allow duplicates. \$\endgroup\$
    – Fmbalbuena
    Nov 24, 2021 at 16:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can do String.fromCharCode(...array) to join all the characters into a string, saving a lot of bytes \$\endgroup\$ Nov 24, 2021 at 16:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh, since you're not doing any preprocessing on the array now, you don't even need .... You can just list the characters, so String.fromCharCode(72,101,108,...) \$\endgroup\$ Nov 24, 2021 at 16:23
2
\$\begingroup\$

Woodchuck, 1161 bytes

Woodchuck is a derivative of BF which uses binary trees. Here is the hello world program.

>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[^^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[^^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^^^^^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>]^^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^<>>[>]%<%^[^]^<<>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[^^^>>]^^^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>]^^<<>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^<>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^<<>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>]%<%^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^<<>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^<>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>]>^<^[^]^>>[>>>[>]>^<^[^]^].^[^]^

Umm... That's quite complex. However, woodchuck is Turing complete, so...

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Python is Magic, 2163 bytes

__builtins__.__getattribute__(__doc__.__repr__.__name__.__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__doc__.__str__.__name__.__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__name__.__len__().__class__.__name__)))(__builtins__.__getattribute__(__annotations__.__class__.__name__.__getitem__(__annotations__.__str__().__len__()).__add__(__doc__.__hash__.__name__.__getitem__(__annotations__.__str__().__len__()).__add__(__name__.__class__.__name__.__getitem__(__annotations__.__str__().__len__()))))(__name__.__len__().__mul__(__name__.__len__().__invert__().__neg__())).__add__(__doc__.__repr__.__name__.__getitem__(__name__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__name__.__mul__.__name__.__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__mul__(__annotations__.__str__().__len__()).__add__(__doc__.__bool__.__name__.__getitem__(__name__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__builtins__.__getattribute__(__doc__.__dir__().__class__.__name__)(__name__).__str__().__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__name__.__eq__.__doc__.__getitem__(__name__.__eq__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__builtins__.__dir__().__getitem__(__name__.__class__.__name__.__len__().__mul__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__().__mul__(__name__.__sizeof__.__name__.__len__()))).__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__doc__.__bool__.__name__.__getitem__(__name__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__doc__.__str__.__name__.__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__name__.__mul__.__name__.__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__name__.__mod__.__name__.__getitem__(__doc__.__class__.__class__.__name__.__len__()).__add__(__builtins__.__getattribute__(__annotations__.__class__.__name__.__getitem__(__annotations__.__str__().__len__()).__add__(__doc__.__hash__.__name__.__getitem__(__annotations__.__str__().__len__()).__add__(__name__.__class__.__name__.__getitem__(__annotations__.__str__().__len__()))))(__name__.__class__.__name__.__len__().__mul__(__name__.__getitem__.__name__.__len__()))))))))))))))

Try it online!

To check if the code is valid then

import re, sys
allowed = r"A-Za-z().,_"
regex = r"(?:__)?([{}]+)(?:__)?".format(allowed)
banned = r"[^{}]".format(allowed)
script = input()

if re.findall(banned, script): 
    raise SyntaxError("Only letters, parenthesis, dot and underscore are allowed.")
print("Valid!")
\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ 1311 bytes \$\endgroup\$
    – Bgil Midol
    Dec 20, 2021 at 19:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ @grandBagel Why? \$\endgroup\$
    – Fmbalbuena
    Dec 20, 2021 at 20:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ It seems like you've copied this directly from the esolangs page without any modifications (such as the trivial one that @grandBagel points out). This isn't disallowed per se, but you should try to optimise for bytes in code-golf \$\endgroup\$
    – Jo King
    Dec 20, 2021 at 21:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ @BgilMidol Here it is with a working interpreter \$\endgroup\$
    – DLosc
    Feb 3 at 16:55
2
\$\begingroup\$

Lexurgy, 23 bytes

For a tool meant for handling strings, it's surprisingly lengthy to output any string longer than 1 or 2 characters without any input.

a:
*=>Hello\,\ World\!
\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Seriously, 1 byte

H

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Time for the "Seriously?" joke. \$\endgroup\$
    – null
    Feb 3 at 14:33
2
\$\begingroup\$

Lean, 22 bytes

#print "Hello, World!"

Try it online!

Shouldn't be on this list at the moment!

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why shouldn't it be on the list at the moment? \$\endgroup\$
    – Bgil Midol
    Feb 18 at 0:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, it wasn't until now, was it? \$\endgroup\$ Feb 18 at 0:42
2
\$\begingroup\$

Python, 22 Bytes

In Python, this is pretty straight-forward:

print("Hello, World!")

This is equivalent to

import sys
sys.stdout.write("Hello, World!")

which is 44 bytes.

If you are in the interpreter, "Hello World" would return itself, but I doubt it goes to sys.stdout.

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to Code Golf! This site is for competitive programming, so answers should include a byte count rather than just solving the problem. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 3 at 6:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ I agree, but I need help on finding the bytes in my code, can you help me out? If you can, I'll edit it and send it again! \$\endgroup\$ Feb 3 at 6:11
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ See Blue's solution, same code, so same byte count. Anyway, if you include a link to TIO like this: Try it online!, there it tells you the byte count: “22 chars, 22 bytes (UTF-8)”. \$\endgroup\$
    – manatwork
    Feb 3 at 6:20
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ I don't think this answer deserves three downvotes. It's a duplicate, but those are explicitly allowed under site rules. It didn't have a byte count at first, but this is a new user and it's not uncommon for people to not be sure how the byte counts work at first. It made effort to explain how the answer works, which is already more effort shown than a good 80% of the answers on this challenge. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 3 at 17:41
2
\$\begingroup\$

QWERTY, 1 byte

q

QWERTY is a work-in-progress language by me, written in C++. The letters in the word QWERTY will be used in the most trivial programs, however, it will be Turing-complete and hopefully not a tarpit.

Eh, but that's cheap.

QWERTY(non-cheap, charmode), 37 bytes

'Ho'eo'loo'oo',o' o'Wo'oo'ro'lo'do'!o

Yep, it's that bad.

QWERTY(stringmode), 28 bytes

"!dlroW ,oleH"(ddodddddddddd

About 2/3 as good :(

QWERTY(optimized stringmode), 16 bytes

"!dlroW ,olleH"s

Now it looks like every other golfing language.

If you wish to see this example, for some reason, take this link: QWERTY

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

99, 283 bytes

Yes there is a language called 99

999 9 9
99 99999999 999 9
99
99 99999 9 999 9
99
99 99 999 999999
99
99
99 9999999 9999 999 9
99
99 99 9999999 9 999 9 999 9 999 9
99
99 99 999999 9 999999 9
99
9999
99 99999 999 999999 999 9
99
99 9999999 9999 9 999 9
99
99 99 999999 9
99
99 99 999999 999 9
99
99 99999 9999999 9
99

Try it online!

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2
\$\begingroup\$

Bit, 637 bytes

BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 0
BIT 1
BIT 0
BIT 0
BYTES 8
PRINT

You heard me right, 637 bytes

-8 thx to mathcat

Try it online!

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1
  • \$\begingroup\$ You don't need println \$\endgroup\$
    – mathcat
    Feb 27 at 12:04
2
\$\begingroup\$

Etch, 20 bytes

New language! :D

:out"Hello, World!";

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2
\$\begingroup\$

Exceptionally, 17 bytes

P"Hello, World!"/

Attempt This Online!

Explanation

P "Hello, World!"  ' Print that string
/                  ' Divide the register (initially 0) by itself to exit the program
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2
\$\begingroup\$

SPDT, 756 bytes

p 0
r 0 0 1 2
r 1 0 2 3
r 4 0 2 3
r 3 0 2 5
r 5 0 2 6
r 6 0 2 7
r 7 0 2 8
r 8 0 2 9
r 9 0 2 10
r 10 0 2 11
r 11 0 2 12
r 12 0 2 13
r 13 0 2 14
r 14 0 2 15
r 15 0 2 4
r 5 0 2 16
r 8 0 2 16
r 11 0 2 16
r 12 0 2 16
r 4 0 2 16
r 8 0 2 17
r 11 0 2 17
r 12 0 2 17
r 13 0 2 17
r 5 0 2 18
r 6 0 2 18
r 7 0 2 18
r 8 0 2 18
r 9 0 2 18
r 11 0 2 18
r 12 0 2 18
r 14 0 2 18
r 15 0 2 18
r 3 0 2 19
r 6 0 2 19
r 7 0 2 19
r 8 0 2 19
r 9 0 2 19
r 12 0 2 19
r 14 0 2 19
r 11 0 2 20
r 13 0 2 20
r 5 0 2 21
r 6 0 2 21
r 7 0 2 21
r 8 0 2 21
r 9 0 2 21
r 10 0 2 21
r 12 0 2 21
r 13 0 2 21
r 14 0 2 21
r 15 0 2 21
r 4 0 2 21
r 3 0 2 22
r 5 0 2 22
r 6 0 2 22
r 7 0 2 22
r 8 0 2 22
r 11 0 2 22
r 12 0 2 22
r 13 0 2 22
r 14 0 2 22
r 15 0 2 22
l 23
l 22
l 21
l 20
l 19
l 18
l 17
l 16

Try it: https://radvylfprograms.com/spdt


SPDT is an esolang I've been wanting to make for a while now. Aside from I/O, it consists entirely of Single Pole Double Throw, or Form C, relays. This answer, which is possibly imperfectly golfed since I used a custom transpiler with macros to generate it, consists of relays forming a loop counting from 1 to 13, then back 1, infinitely. For each of these states, it uses relays to only light up the bits which are on in that character of Hello, World!, producing the following output:

An animated GIF, showing 13 frames, with each consisting of 8 boxes representing bits, which represent the characters in "Hello, World!"

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2
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AMD64 ELF, 86 bytes

f0VMRrABsg5IjTU5AAAAPQIAPgCJx+sYAQAAAAUAAAAYAAAAAAAAABgAAAAFAAAADwUp0Jc9OAABALA8DwUAAAEAsDwPBQAASGVsbG8sIFdvcmxkIQo=

Encoded in Base64 RFC4648

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2
\$\begingroup\$

EEL - 86 Bytes

=72 !>=101 !>=108 !>=108 !>=111 !>=44 !>=32 !>=87 !>=111 !>=114 !>=108 !>=100 !>=33 !.

Explanation

EEL (Easy Esoteric Lang) is an esoteric programming language created by me, easy to manage, hence the name. Below is a brief description of the language.

.-EEL is based on a vector of bytes initialized to zero, on which basic arithmetic operations can be performed, whose length is equal to 64Kb.

.-EEL allows the reading and writing of one byte at a time in the form of an ASCII character in the standard input and output respectively.

.-EEL has a brief help section which can be viewed from the interpreter.

.-EEL is extremely sensitive, so a wrong input byte can cause a wrong output.

.-EEL does not have an error/exception handling system, so it may crash unexpectedly if a fatal error such as division by zero occurs.

Defined operations:

=000 -> Copy the value of number 000 to the current byte.

+000 -> Add to the current byte, the value of number 000.

-000 -> Subtract to the current byte, the value of number 000.

*000 -> Multiply to the current byte, the value of number 000.

/000 -> Divide to the current byte, the value of number 000 (cannot be zero).

%000 -> Calculate the modulo of the current byte and the value of number 000 (cannot be zero).

> -> Go to the next byte of the vector.

< -> Go to the previous byte of the vector.

? -> Read a ASCII character from STDIN and assign it to current byte.

! -> Write to current byte in STDOUT as an ASCII character.

: -> Open/close the space for comments.

. -> Exit the program.

$ -> Reference to current byte.

NOTES:

The 000 number can be s current byte reference operator ($).

The 000 number (x) must be an integer number, such 0 < x <= 255.

There must be a space character u+0020 after each number 000.

Try the EEL interpreter!

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1
\$\begingroup\$

C++, 59 bytes

#include <iostream>
int main(){std::cout<<"Hello, World!";}
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6
  • \$\begingroup\$ Isn't the newline optional? \$\endgroup\$
    – jrich
    Aug 28, 2015 at 14:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ @UndefinedFunction try it. It will not work without a new line \$\endgroup\$
    – galexite
    Aug 28, 2015 at 17:36
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Isn't printf smaller? #include <cstdio>? \$\endgroup\$
    – galexite
    Aug 28, 2015 at 17:37
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @georgeunix My comment referred to a previous version, in which it read cout<<"Hello, World!\n". The \n was removed, since a newline was not required after the output. \$\endgroup\$
    – jrich
    Aug 28, 2015 at 17:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh OK, sorry for that @UndefinedFunction \$\endgroup\$
    – galexite
    Aug 28, 2015 at 17:39
1
\$\begingroup\$

Stackstack, 20 Bytes

This is a stack-based language not focused on golfing! Looks similar to Forth, and was made two years ago.

"Hello, World!"print
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1
\$\begingroup\$

STATA, 17 bytes

di"Hello, World!"
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1
\$\begingroup\$

Enema, 21 bytes

"!dlroW ,olleH"[DZBO]

How it works

"!dlroW ,olleH" Push those characters (including a null byte) on the stack.
[               Infinite loop:
  D               Duplicate the topmost element on the stack.
  Z               If it is non-zero, skip the next instruction.
    B             Break out of the loop.
  O             Output as a character.
]
\$\endgroup\$
1
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Element, 17 bytes

Hello\,\ World\!`

The ` outputs the string, while the \s are used to escape out of other characters.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

FALSE, 15 bytes

"Hello, World!"
\$\endgroup\$
1
17 18
19
20 21
31

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