36
\$\begingroup\$

My teacher always gives me the most complicated set of math problems for homework. Like: pg. 546: 17-19, 22, 26, pg. 548: 35-67 odd, 79, 80-86 even. And I want to know in advance how much time to set aside for my homework, but I don't want to have to figure all that out. That's why its your task to program it for me.

Specifications

  • You will get a string detailing the problems that I have to complete as args, stdio, etc.
  • They will be comma separated (possibly comma-space separated)
  • It will include single problems in the form of just a number (e.g. 79)
  • And ranges in the form 17-18 (again, you have to deal with optional spaces)
  • The ranges are inclusive of both ends
  • The ranges will optionally be suffixed by odd or even, which you have to take into account.
  • A set of ranges/pages will be prepended by a page number in the form pg. 545:, again having to deal with optional spaces. You can safely ignore these, as you need to get the problems over all the pages
  • The text may be in uppercase or lowercase, but will not be both.
  • Return, stdout, etc. the number of problems I have to do for homework.
  • Since this is , shortest code in bytes wins!

Test Cases

pg. 546: 17-19, 22, 26, pg. 548: 35-67 odd, 79, 80-86 even   ->    27
pg. 34: 1                                                    ->    1
PG. 565: 2-5,PG.345:7                                        ->    5
pg. 343: 5,8,13 - 56 even,pg. 345: 34 - 78,80                ->    70
pg.492: 2-4 odd,7-9 even                                     ->    2
\$\endgroup\$
  • 12
    \$\begingroup\$ Can the professor give you a range of 2-4 odd? It appears to cause some problems for simpler approaches. \$\endgroup\$ – Björn Lindqvist Jun 3 '15 at 3:06
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ ^ I think this should be a test case, according to the current problem statement. \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Jun 3 '15 at 15:10
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ There should be this test case: pg.492: 2-4 odd,7-9 even -> 2 \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Jun 3 '15 at 15:40
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Can the ranges overlap? E.g. 22-26,25-30? \$\endgroup\$ – Reto Koradi Jun 3 '15 at 17:32
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @RetoKoradi no. \$\endgroup\$ – Maltysen Jun 3 '15 at 23:18

10 Answers 10

15
\$\begingroup\$

CJam, 61 58 51 48 46 43 41 38 bytes

leuS-',/{':/W>:~_2*2<~z),>1f&\,5--~}%,

Verify the test cases in the CJam interpreter.

How it works

leuS-      e# Read a line from STDIN, convert to uppercase and remove spaces.
',/        e# Split at commas.
{          e# For each chunk:
  ':/W>    e#   Split at colons and only keep the last chunk.
  :~       e#   Evaluate the string inside the array.
  _2*      e#   Copy the array, repeated twice.
  2<       e#   Keep only the first two elements.

           e#   In all possible cases, the array now contains exactly two
           e#   integers, which are equal in case of a single problem.

  ~        e#   Dump the array on the stack.
  z),      e#   Push [0 ... -N], where N is the second integer.
  >        e#   Discard the first M elements, where M is the first integer.
  1f&      e#   Replace each element by its parity.
  \,       e#   Push L, the length of the original array.

           e#   EVEN and ODD all push elements, so L is 1 for single problems,
           e#   2 for simple ranges, 5 for odd ranges and 6 for even ranges.

  5--      e#   Discard all elements equal to L - 5 from the array of parities.

           e#   This removes 0's for odd ranges, 1's for even ranges, -3's for
           e#   other ranges and -4's for single problems, thus counting only
           e#   problems of the desired parities.

  ~        e#   Dump the resulting array on the stack.
}%         e# Collect the results in an array.
,          e# Compute its length.
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does this work with the newest test case? \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Jun 4 '15 at 2:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ It does. I've added the latest test case to the link. \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Jun 4 '15 at 2:38
10
\$\begingroup\$

Perl - 47 Bytes

#!perl -p054
{map$\+=($_%2x9^lc$')!~T,$&..$'*/\d+ ?-/}}{

Amended to pass the new test case.


Original

Perl - 36 Bytes

#!perl -p054
$\+=/\d+ ?-/*($'-$&>>/o|e/i)+1}{

Counting the shebang as 4, input is taken from stdin.


Sample Usage

$ echo pg. 546: 17-19, 22, 26, pg. 548: 35-67 odd, 79, 80-86 even | perl math-problems.pl
27

$ echo pg. 34: 1 | perl math-problems.pl
1

$ echo PG. 565: 2-5,PG.345:7 | perl math-problems.pl
5

$ echo pg. 343: 5,8,13 - 56 even,pg. 345: 34 - 78,80 | perl math-problems.pl
70

Caveats

For even/odd ranges, it is expected that at least one of the endpoints matches the parity of the range. For example, 11-19 odd, 11-20 odd, and 10-19 odd will all be correctly counted as 5, but 10-20 odd will be over-counted as 6.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ how does this work for pg. 20: 13-15 even? or pg. 20: 13-14 even? \$\endgroup\$ – Not that Charles Jun 3 '15 at 2:29
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ * is one character shorter than &&, making for an easy improvement: $\+=/\d+ ?-/*($'-$&>>/o|e/i)+1for@F}{ \$\endgroup\$ – Grimy Jun 3 '15 at 12:00
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Man, this is clever! Unless I'm missing something, you should be able to eliminate lc=~. \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Jun 5 '15 at 4:51
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I got that the T^ part, but somehow missed that lc changed the case of $'. Prepending lc to $' would have been slightly shorter. That should still work for either approach: lc$'!~(T^lc$_%2) or ($_%2x9^lc$')!~T \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Jun 5 '15 at 13:29
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Dennis for the previous version, it would have required parentheses. !~T is genius though, thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – primo Jun 6 '15 at 2:34
6
\$\begingroup\$

Python 2, 259 253 249 239 bytes

Try it here

This can probably still be golfed more.

Edit: Fixed a bug that caused mine to not work for 2-4 even as I had expected. Then made an adjustment for that fix. That fix saved me four bytes!

Edit: Now uses input() and +2 bytes for the two quotation marks the user must surround input with.

import re
c=0
for x in re.sub(r'..\..*?:','',input()).replace(' ','').split(','):
 y=x.split('-')
 if len(y)<2:c+=1
 else:
    a,b=y[0],y[1];d=int(re.sub('[A-z]','',b))-int(a)+1
    if b[-1]>':':d=d/2+d%2*(int(a)%2==ord(b[-3])%2)
    c+=d
print c

Less golfed (with comments! :D):

I hope these comments help some. I'm still not quite sure if I explained that last complex line correctly or not.

import re
def f(s):
    c=0
    l=re.sub(r'..\..*?:','',s).replace(' ','').split(',')   # remove pg #'s and split
    for x in l:
        y=x.split('-')
        if len(y)<2:                                # if not a range of numbers
            c+=1
        else:
            a,b=y[0],y[1]                           # first and second numbers in range
            d=int(re.sub('[A-z]','',b))-int(a)+1    # number of pages
            if b[-1]>':':                           # if last character is not a digit
                # half the range
                # plus 1 if odd # of pages, but only if first and last numbers in the range
                #       are the same parity
                # ord(b[-3])%2 is 0 for even (v), 1 for odd (o)
                d=d/2+(d%2)*(int(a)%2==ord(b[-3])%2)
            c+=d
    print c
\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Just a little thing, since you are using Python 2, you can use spaces and tabs (1 byte each) as different indents. Relevant tip \$\endgroup\$ – FryAmTheEggman Jun 3 '15 at 3:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also found I had the count wrong at first. Copying tabs from the editors converts them to spaces. \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Jun 3 '15 at 15:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can save at least 4 bytes by doing s=raw_input() and removing some indentation. \$\endgroup\$ – user34736 Jun 3 '15 at 20:03
4
\$\begingroup\$

Pyth, 43 42 44 42 bytes

lsm-%R2}hKvMc-ecd\:G\-eK?}\ed}edGYc-rzZd\,

Try it online: Demonstration or Test harness

I think I can still chop one or two bytes.

Explanation

lsm-%R2}hKvMc-ecd\:G\-eK?}\ed}edGYc-rzZd\,  implicit: z = input string
                                    rzZ     convert z to lower-case
                                   -   d    remove all spaces from z
                                  c     \,  and split by ","
  m                                         map each part d to:
               cd\:                           split d by ":"
              e                               and only use the last part (removes page number)
             -     G                          remove all letters (removes odd/even)
            c       \-                        split by "-"
          vM                                  and evaluate all (one or two) numbers
         K                                    and store the result in K
       }hK            eK                      create the list [K[0], K[0]+1, ..., K[-1]]
    %R2                                       apply modulo 2 to each element
   -                                          and remove:
                         }\ed                   "e" in d (1 for in, 0 for not in)
                        ?    }edG               if d[-1] in "abcde...z" else
                                 Y              dummy value
 s                                            combine all the lists
l                                             print the length                                      
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does this work with the newest test case? \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Jun 4 '15 at 2:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007: It does. \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Jun 4 '15 at 3:36
3
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript (Spidermonkey console) - 139

It's just easier to test on the command line.

for(r=/[:,] *(\d+)[- ]*(\d+)? *(o|e)?/gi,m=readline(z=0);f=r.exec(m);z+=!b||((p=b-a)%2||!c|a%2^/e/i.test(c))+p/(2-!c)|0)[,a,b,c]=f
print(z)

Ungolfed:

// any number set after "pg:" or a comma
// \1 is FROM, \2 is TO, \3 is odd/even 
r=/[:,] *(\d+)[- ]*(\d+)? *(o|e)?/gi;
m=readline();
z=0; // this is the sum.
while(f=r.exec(m)){
    [,from,to,oddEven]=f;
    if(!to) {
        z++;
    } else {
        if((to-from)%2) {
            // if to and from are not the same parity, add 1
            z++;
        } else {
            // if to and from are not the same parity...
            if(!oddEven) {
                // and we don't have a parity marker, add one
                z++;
            } else if(a%2 != /e/i.test(c)) {
                // if we do have a parity marker,
                // AND the parity of from and to matches the 
                // parity of the oddEven sign, then add 1
                z++;
            }
        }
        // then add the difference between to-from and
        // if oddEven exists, divide by two and round down
        z+=(to-from)/(oddEven?2:1)|0;
    }

}
print(z);
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can [,from,to] just simply be [from,to]? \$\endgroup\$ – TuukkaX Jun 4 '16 at 17:06
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @TuukkaX no because that is to discard the first value of the array from r.exec, which contains the entire matched string. \$\endgroup\$ – Patrick Roberts Jun 4 '16 at 18:16
3
\$\begingroup\$

Factor - 488 bytes:

USING: arrays ascii kernel math math.parser math.ranges pcre sequences ;
IN: examples.golf.homework

: c ( a -- b )
    >lower "(?:[,:]|^) *(\\d+) *(?:- *(\\d+) *(e|o)?)?" findall [
        rest [ second dup string>number swap or ] map
        dup length 1 = [ drop 1 ] [
            dup length 2 = [ first2 swap - 1 + ] [
                first3 "o" = [ [a,b] [ odd? ] count ] [
                    [a,b] [ even? ] count
                ] if
            ] if
        ] if
    ] map sum ;
\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Bash 344 315 306 294 262 252 242 240

IFS=,
o(){ R=0;for ((i=$1;i<=$2;R+=i++%2));do :
done
}
e(){ q=$R;o $*;((R=q-R))
}
for c in ${1,,};do
c=${c#*:}
m=${c##* }
l=${c%-*}
l=${l// }
h=${c#*-}
[[ a< $m ]]&&h=${h% *}
h=${h// }
((R=h-l+1))
eval "${m::1} $l $h"
((t+=R))
done;echo $t

I don't think I've golfed this as much as is possible but not bad for a first submission. Commented version below.

IFS=, # Setup IFS for the for loops, We want to be able to split on commas

o(){ # Odd
    R=0  # Reset the R variable

    # Increments R for each odd element in the range
    # $1-$2 inclusive
    for ((i=$1;i<=$2;R+=i++%2));do
        : # Noop command
    done
}

e(){ # Even
    # Save R, it contains the total number of elements between low
    # and high
    q=$R
    # Call Odd, This will set R
    o $*
    # Set R = total number of elements in sequence - number of odd elements.
    ((R=q-R))
}

# This lowercases the firs arg. IFS causes it to split on commas.
for c in ${1,,};do
    c=${c#*:}  # Strips the page prefix if it exists
    m=${c##* }  # Capture the odd/even suffix if it exists
    l=${c%-*}  # Capture low end of a range, Strips hyphen and anything after it
    l=${l// }  # Strips spaces
    h=${c#*-}  # Capture high end of a range, Strips up to and including hyphen

    # If we have captured odd/even in m this will trigger and strip
    # it from the high range variable.
    [[ a< $m ]]&&h=${h% *}
    h=${h// }  # Strip Spaces

    # Give R a value.
    # If we are in a range it will be the number of elements in that range.
    # If we arent l and h will be equal are R will be 1
    ((R=h-l+1))

    # Call the odd or even functions if we captured one of them in m.
    # If we didnt m will contain a number and this will cause a warning
    # to stderr but it still works.
    eval "${m::1} $l $h"

    # Add R to total
    ((t+=R))
done

# Print result
echo $t

Run the test cases:

bash math.sh "pg. 546: 17-19, 22, 26, pg. 548: 35-67 odd, 79, 80-86 even"
bash math.sh "pg. 34: 1"
bash math.sh "PG. 565: 2-5,PG.345:7"
bash math.sh "pg. 343: 5,8,13 - 56 even,pg. 345: 34 - 78,80"
bash math.sh "pg.492: 2-4 odd,7-9 even"

Depending on how I read the rules it could be possible to save another 4 bytes. If even/odd is always lowercase ${1,,} can be changed to $1

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does this work with the newest test case? \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Jun 4 '15 at 2:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Just tested it and yes it does. \$\endgroup\$ – Daniel Wakefield Jun 4 '15 at 9:59
1
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript (ES6), 149

Run snippet in Firefox to test

F=s=>s.replace(/([-,.:]) *(\d+) *(o?)(e?)/ig,(_,c,v,o,e)=>
  c=='-'?(t+=1+(o?(v-(r|1))>>1:e?(v-(-~r&~1))>>1:v-r),r=0)
  :c!='.'&&(t+=!!r,r=v)
,r=t=0)&&t+!!r

// Less golfed

U=s=>{
  var r = 0, // value, maybe range start
  t = 0; // total
  s.replace(/([-,.:]) *(\d+) *(o?)(e?)/ig, // execute function for each match
    (_ // full match, not used
     , c // separator char, match -:,.
     , v // numeric value
     , o // match first letter of ODD if present
     , e // match first letter of EVEN if present
    )=>
    {
      if (c == '-') // range end
      {
        t++; // in general, count range values as end - start + 1
        if (o) // found 'odd'
        {
          r = r | 1; // if range start is even, increment to next odd
          t += (v-r)>>1; // end - start / 2
        }
        else if (e) // found 'even'
        {
          r = (r+1) & ~1; // if range start is odd, increment to next even
          t += (v-r)>>1; // end - start / 2
        }
        else
        {
          t += v-r; // end - start
        }
        r = 0; // range start value was used
      }
      else if (c != '.') // ignore page numbers starting with '.'
      { 
        // if a range start was already saved, then it was a single value, count it
        if (r != 0) ++t;
        r = v; // save value as it counld be a range start
      }
    }
  )            
  if (r != 0) ++t; // unused, pending range start, was a single value
  return t
}

// TEST

out=x=>O.innerHTML+=x+'\n';

test=["pg. 546: 17-19, 22, 26, pg. 548: 35-67 odd, 79, 80-86 even",
"pg. 34: 1", "PG. 565: 2-5,PG.345:7",
"pg. 343: 5,8,13 - 56 even,pg. 345: 34 - 78,80"];

test.forEach(t=>out(t + ' --> ' + F(t)))
<pre id=O></pre>

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

C++ 226 224 222

I know I'm kinda late for the party, but this seemed like a fun problem and lack of entries using C-family languages bothered me.

So here's a C++ function using no regexp or string substitution, just some simple math:

void f(){char c;int o=0,i,j;while(cin>>c)c=='p'||c==80?cin.ignore(9,58):cin.unget(),cin>>i>>c&&c==45?cin>>j>>c&&(c=='e'||c=='o')?cin.ignore(9,44),c=='e'?i+=i&1,j+=!(j&1):(i+=!(i&1),j+=j&1),o+=(j-i)/2:o+=j-i:0,++o;cout<<o;}

Ungolfed:

void f()
{
  char c;
  int o=0,i,j;
  while(cin>>c)
    c=='p'||c==80?cin.ignore(9,58):cin.unget(),
    cin>>i>>c&&c==45?
      cin>>j>>c&&(c=='e'||c=='o')?
        cin.ignore(9,44),
        c=='e'?
          i+=i&1,j+=!(j&1)
        :(i+=!(i&1),j+=j&1),
        o+=(j-i)/2
      :o+=j-i
    :0,
    ++o;
  cout<<o;
}

I didn't say it would be readable, now did I? :) Ternary operators are hell. I tried my best to (sort of) format it, though, so I hope it helps at least a little bit.

Usage:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void f(){char c;int o=0,i,j;while(cin>>c)c=='p'||c==80?cin.ignore(9,58):cin.unget(),cin>>i>>c&&c==45?cin>>j>>c&&(c=='e'||c=='o')?cin.ignore(9,44),c=='e'?i+=i&1,j+=!(j&1):(i+=!(i&1),j+=j&1),o+=(j-i)/2:o+=j-i:0,++o;cout<<o;}

int main()
{
  f();
}
\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Python 2 - 163 bytes:

Try it here

Input must be given inside quotes

import re
print len(eval(re.sub('([^,]+:|) *(\d+) *-? *(\d*)(?=.(.)).*?,',r'[x for x in range(\2,\3+1 if \3.0 else \2+1)if x%2!="oe".find("\4")]+',input()+',[]')))

Explanation:

The general approach is to convert the existing input into valid python, then evaluate this. Each comma separated value is converted to an array, which are then all appended together and the length gives the final result.

For example, with the input 12-15 odd,19, before evaluation the regex substitution will produce:

[x for x in range(12,15+1 if 15.0 else 12+1)if x%2!="oe".find("o")]
+[x for x in range(19,+1 if .0 else 19+1)if x%2!="oe".find("[")]
+[]

To break this down further:

  • 15+1 if 15.0 else 12+1 This bit will make sure the second argument of range() is correct depending if there is a range or a single value given (if \3 is empty, \3.0 will evaluate to false).
  • if x%2!="oe".find("o") Depending on the value found two characters away from the final digit in the range ((?=.(.)) in the regex - lookahead two characters without consuming them), there are three possible outcomes:

    • x%2!="oe".find("o") evaluates to x % 2 != 0 (only odd matched)
    • x%2!="oe".find("e") evaluates to x % 2 != 1 (only even matched)
    • x%2!="oe".find("[") evaluates to x % 2 != -1 (this character could be multiple things as it's just two characters away from the last digit, but will only be o or e if odd/even is intended)
  • The seemingly random +[] on the end is to ensure that the last token in the comma-separated list has a character two away from the last digit, but also allows us to append something to the end to use up the last '+' which would have been trailing otherwise.
\$\endgroup\$

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