30
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Challenge

Let's have a list L of n elements. The task is to swap every two elements in this list.

Constrains

  • the list L has at least two elements
  • size of the list L is a multiple of two (i.e. number of elements is even)

Example

  • input: [1,2,3,4,5,6]

  • output: [2,1,4,3,6,5]

  • input: [0,1,0,1]

  • output: [1,0,1,0]

Rules

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5
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to Code Golf and nice first question! For future reference, we recommend using the Sandbox to get feedback on challenge ideas before posting them to main \$\endgroup\$
    – Mayube
    Nov 10, 2021 at 16:42
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ What types of elements must the list support? In particular, is it all right if a solution only works on lists of non-negative/unsigned integers? \$\endgroup\$
    – DLosc
    Nov 10, 2021 at 17:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, that's fine \$\endgroup\$
    – matusf
    Nov 10, 2021 at 20:19
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Can we use a char[] array in a language like C? If so, there is a certain built-in that would make the answer very short (s***). \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2021 at 0:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sure, go ahead. However, I'd say that if there are two solutions with the same length, then the more general one wins (the one that works for more inputs/datatypes). \$\endgroup\$
    – matusf
    Nov 12, 2021 at 0:41

73 Answers 73

21
\$\begingroup\$

><>, 4 3 bytes

i#o

Try it online!

Lol, ><> ties with beats Jelly & 05AB1E. Terminates with an error.

-1 thanks to @Manny Queen.

How does it work?

     The instruction pointer (IP) is currently moving right
i    Take input as a character
 #   Reflect - The IP starts moving left
i    Take input again
  o  Output that
 #   Reflect - The IP starts moving right again
  o  Output the first input we took - the inputs are now swapped

And now, we're moving left and back at the start again on i + moving right. 
This loops forever (i.e. until erroring when we're out of input) 
because there is no halt instruction (;)
This is essentially executing "iioo" in an infinite loop.
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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ no longer beats Vyxal \$\endgroup\$
    – Wasif
    Nov 11, 2021 at 8:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @wasif Oh well, still beats Jelly and osabie. \$\endgroup\$
    – emanresu A
    Nov 11, 2021 at 9:14
12
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Python 3, 34 bytes

f=lambda l:l and l[1::-1]+f(l[2:])

Try it online!

When l is empty (which makes it falsy), return it directly. Otherwise, reverse the first two elements and make a recursive call for the rest.

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12
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Vyxal r, 2 bytes

yY

Try it Online!

Explanation:

y  # Uninterleave
 Y # Interleave
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2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ What does the r flag do? \$\endgroup\$ Nov 10, 2021 at 17:49
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @ZippyMagician The r flag makes all commands take their arguments in reverse order. That doesn't affect y since it only has one argument, but it does affect Y, meaning that the program is essentially equivalent to y$Y, which swaps the halves before interleaving. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 10, 2021 at 17:53
12
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Haskell, 22 bytes

f(a:b:c)=b:a:f c
f x=x

Try it online!

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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ f=concatMap(reverse.take 2).iterate(drop 2) \$\endgroup\$ Nov 22, 2021 at 21:13
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @Roman Czyborra nice but there's nothing stopping iterate.. that way works fine \$\endgroup\$
    – AZTECCO
    Nov 23, 2021 at 0:06
11
\$\begingroup\$

convey, 7 bytes

I knew I should have implemented SpaceChem's flipflop operator, then this would be 5 bytes. :-)

-6 byte by @Manny Queen

}?{
}~1

Try it online!

{ puts the input list on the conveyor, } prints the result. On the ? the elements try to go down if they can. On the ~ they will wait for 1 tick before going to the output, thus starting with the first item, every second element is delayed for two ticks.

13 bytes

},<
{@^
0"
1^

Try it online!

The lower loop 0"\1^ copies 0 1 0 1 … into choose @. The input is thus split into two paths. The right one takes a little bit longer, so the other number can overtake it before joining , again.

variant 2 with input 1 to 6

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3
  • \$\begingroup\$ The second one can be made shorter with some rearrangement. \$\endgroup\$
    – m90
    Nov 11, 2021 at 6:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ This makes me want to learn convey. It looks awesome. \$\endgroup\$
    – stanri
    Nov 11, 2021 at 18:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MannyQueen, m90 thanks! Multiple outputs are well defined when they don't fire at the same step, so this is a very neat solution! \$\endgroup\$
    – xash
    Nov 12, 2021 at 18:21
10
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Rust v1.37.0, 59 55 47 bytes

|a:&[_]|(0..).zip(a).map(|i|a[i.0^1]).collect()

Try it online!

-2 bytes thanks to ZippyMagician
-2 bytes thanks to alephalpha
-8 bytes thanks to (0..).zip(a)

Rust is not a golfy language...
Port of the C# and JS answers
v1.37.0 is the version available on TIO

Rust stable, 54 bytes

|a:&[_]|a.chunks(2).flat_map(|a|[a[1],a[0]]).collect()

Try it online!

Thanks to ZippyMagician for this slightly golfier answer on the latest version of Rust.

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4
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ If you don’t use tio's outdated version of rust, |a:&[i32]|a.chunks(2).flat_map(|a|[a[1],a[0]]).collect() is 3 bytes shorter \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2021 at 1:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you do, 57 bytes \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2021 at 1:24
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I think you can use &[_] instead of &[i32]. \$\endgroup\$
    – alephalpha
    Nov 11, 2021 at 1:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ZippyMagician I managed to outgolf your stable rust answer with TIO's outdated version of rust :P \$\endgroup\$
    – Mayube
    Nov 18, 2021 at 17:44
9
\$\begingroup\$

brainfuck, 9 bytes

,[>,.<.,]

Try it online!

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8
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Python 2, 30 bytes

def f(a,b,*m):print b,a,;f(*m)

Try it online!

The function f takes input splatted like f(1,2,3,4,5,6), and prints the output space-separated, terminating with error.


34 bytes

lambda l:map(l.pop,len(l)/2*[1,0])

Try it online!

This works by alternating popping the elements at index 1 and index 0.

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7
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Wolfram Language (Mathematica), 22 bytes

0<##<1||#2&&#&&#0@##3&

Try it online!

Input [L...], and returns in an And. Works on integer inputs.


Wolfram Language (Mathematica), 24 bytes

{}=={##}||#2&&#&&#0@##3&

Try it online!

Input [L...], and returns in an And. Works on non-boolean inputs.

Wolfram Language (Mathematica), 26 bytes

#2~##&~#&@@@#~Partition~2&

Try it online!

Input [L], and returns a list. Works.

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4
  • \$\begingroup\$ #~Partition~2~Reverse~2& is –2 bytes, if the OP doesn't mind the extra braces in the output: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}{{2, 1}, {4, 3}, {6, 5}} \$\endgroup\$
    – theorist
    Nov 11, 2021 at 5:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ @theorist IMO, that doesn't output what the specs ask for - it outputs a list of pairs. \$\endgroup\$
    – att
    Nov 11, 2021 at 6:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, figured you'd say that :). Could you save anything using BlockMap instead of Partition? E.g., BlockMap[Reverse,#,2]& is 2 bytes shorter than #~Partition~2~Reverse~2&. And how would you implement your function in the MMA front end? E.g., list={1,2,3,4,5,6} #2~##&~#&@@@#~Partition~2&@list doesn't work. \$\endgroup\$
    – theorist
    Nov 11, 2021 at 7:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @theorist I initially thought about BlockMap, but arguments to the function are provided as a list, so ...@@# is required, making Partition with @@@ shorter. Use ##&[#2,#]& instead; I'm not sure why infix ##& is recognized in wolframscript but not in a notebook. \$\endgroup\$
    – att
    Nov 11, 2021 at 7:36
6
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JavaScript (ES6), 23 bytes

x=>x.map((_,i)=>x[i^1])

The [i^1] is thanks to m90 in TNB

Try it online!

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5
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Python 3, 36 bytes

lambda a:sum(zip(a[1::2],a[::2]),())

Try it online!

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5
\$\begingroup\$

Python 3 + numpy, 31 bytes

lambda m:m[~-(m==m).cumsum()^1]

Try it online!

Expects a numpy array. Most of the code is about avoiding referencing numpy directly, so we can avoid the explicit import. It then calculates the indices directly by xoring a counter with 1.

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2
4
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C (clang), 53 \$\cdots\$ 43 42 bytes

f(*l,n){*l^=l[1]^(l[1]=*l);n&&f(l+2,n-2);}

Try it online!

Inputs a pointer in an int array and the array's length (since pointers in C carry no length info).
Swaps every two elements in place.

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2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ this also modifies past the end of the array \$\endgroup\$
    – att
    Nov 10, 2021 at 18:51
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @att I know, what's the problem? \$\endgroup\$
    – Noodle9
    Nov 10, 2021 at 18:57
4
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Ruby, 26 bytes

->l{r=-1;l.map{l[1^r+=1]}}

Try it online!

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4
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Ly, 7 bytes

ir[foo]

Try it online!

Pretty straightforward, but might be worth posting since it's almost pronounceable. :)

ir       -- read input codepoints into the stack, reverse the order
  [   ]  -- while the stack isn't empty
   foo   -- flip the top two entries and print as characters

Cubix, 14 bytes

..@.i?i.o;o;.^

Try it online!

This is the first time I've tried to use Cubix, so I wouldn't be suprised if it's possible to do this with less code. It's a hard language to explain, since it's a 2D language where the code is wrapped around a cube. So the directions the instruction pointer take a hard to show in a description. I'll include a link to the online interpreter since it has a debug mode when you can see the way the code iterates through the cells.

But I'll try to explain it too...

..@.i?i.o;o;.^ - code before it's wrapped on the cube...
    i          - (1) starts here, input a codepoint
     ?         - branch if top of stack, <0 "left", >0 "right"
  @            - "left" (true on EOF), halt program
             ^ - "right", set IP direction to "up"
     ?         - same branch, but coming from another direction
      i        - "right", input another codepoint
        o;     - output top of stack as char, pop it off stack
          o;   - repeat... code wraps back to (1)

The . characters are no-ops and are needed to place the other characters in the right position so they will wrap into place on the cube.

Here's a link to the online interpreter http://ethproductions.github.io/cubix/?code=Li5ALmk/aS5vO287Ll4=&input=MTIzNDU2Nzg=&speed=20

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4
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J, 9 bytes

[:,_2|.\]

Try it online!

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4
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4, 22 bytes

3.72082072152152072094

Try it online!

Readable + explanation:

3. 720 820 721 521 520 720 9 4
^^------------------------------ mandatory prefix
   ^^^-------------------------- initial input in cell 20
       ^^^-----------------^---- loop while cell 20 is nonzero
           ^^^------------------ input to cell 21
               ^^^-------------- output cell 21
                   ^^^---------- output cell 20
                       ^^^------ input to cell 20
                           ^---- end loop
                             ^-- exit

Corresponding Quartic program:

decl a, b
input a
loop a
  input b
  print b
  print a
  input a
end
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4
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AWK, 43 41 bytes

{for(;++n<NF;n++)$n+=$(n+1)-($(n+1)=$n)}1

Thanks for Dominic van Essen for 2 less bytes!

Try it online!

{
for(;++n<NF;n++)        Starts a loop though the numbers.
                        n has to start as 1, because $0 is the whole line.
$n+=$(n+1)-($(n+1)=$n)  Swap the numbers two by two.
                        Readable: a += b - (b = a)
}
1                       Prints the line.
\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ If you swap ++n for n=1 (same bytes), it'll also work for subsequent lines of input... (currently the second 'try it online' line fails) \$\endgroup\$ Nov 13, 2021 at 18:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ You are right!! Thanks for that. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 13, 2021 at 18:33
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ ...or 41 bytes if you don't care about subsequent lines (and I don't think you need to care about them here...) \$\endgroup\$ Nov 13, 2021 at 18:39
4
\$\begingroup\$

T-SQL, 32 bytes

Input is a table variable

SELECT a FROM @ ORDER BY b+b%2*2

Try it online

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4
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CLC-INTERCAL, 95 67 bytes.

Why does CLC-INTERCAL 1.-94.-2 lack !1~.1'? I could have golfed off one byte.

DOCOMEFROM#9(1)DOWRITEIN.1+.2DDOCOMEFROM'.1~.1'~#1(9)DOREADOUT.2+.1

Copy and paste to try it online!

Usage

  • Each item of list must be in ONE to SIX FIVE FIVE THREE FIVE (inclusive); ZERO for end of list.
    • Given from STDIN, delimited with a LF.
  • Outputs to STDOUT, as roman number.

Try these inputs

ONE
TWO
ONE
TWO
ZERO
ONE
TWO
THREE
FOUR
FIVE
SIX
ZERO
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4
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Desmos, 39 38 bytes

l=[1...L.length]
f(L)=L[l-1+2mod(l,2)]

Try It On Desmos!

Try It On Desmos! - Prettified

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0
4
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BQN, 10 9 bytesSBCS

-1 byte thanks to Razetime!

⥊·⌽˘∘‿2⊸⥊

Run online!

∘‿2⥊𝕩 Reshape the input into a matrix with 2 columns and and the necessary number of rows.
⌽˘ Reverse horizontally (Swap the 2 columns).
Flatten into a vector.

An alternative using the Under operator at 10 bytes:

⌽˘⌾(∘‿2⊸⥊)

Try it online!

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3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ useful userscript: github.com/razetime/userscripts/blob/main/bqncgcc.user.js \$\endgroup\$
    – Razetime
    Dec 10, 2021 at 10:10
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Rezetime thanks and thanks! I already read that Nothing is supposed to be useful in trains, now I see why \$\endgroup\$
    – ovs
    Dec 10, 2021 at 10:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ TIL about using with Reshape, fascinating. \$\endgroup\$
    – DLosc
    Jul 14 at 17:30
3
\$\begingroup\$

Jelly, 4 bytes

s2UF

Try It Online!

s2    Slices of length 2
  U   Reverse each
   F  Flatten
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3
\$\begingroup\$

Perl 5 -p, 21 bytes

s/(\S+) (\S+)/$2 $1/g

Try it online!

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3
3
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APL+WIN, 17 bytes

Prompts for vector

,⌽((.5×⍴r),2)⍴r←⎕

Try it online! Thanks to Dyalog Classic

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3
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Zsh, 18 bytes

for a b;<<<$b<<<$a

Attempt This Online!

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1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Excellent solution. Didn't realise there was already a Zsh answer - puts my 30B to shame :P \$\endgroup\$
    – roblogic
    Nov 12, 2021 at 9:53
3
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C# (.NET Core) with Linq, 32 26 bytes

a=>a.Select((n,i)=>a[i^1])

Try it online!

-8 bytes thanks to m90's witchcraft

C# (.NET Core), 73 bytes

a=>{for(int i=0,d=0;i<a.Length;i++){d=a[i];a[i]=a[++i];a[i]=d;}return a;}

Try it online!

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3
\$\begingroup\$

Add++, 57 bytes

a:?
b:0
n:0
m:3
`b
Ea,Ib=n,,b:1,,x:i,+1,Ib=m,,b:0,,Oi,,Ox

Try it online!

Input is the first argument.

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3
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Rockstar, 98 bytes

Listen to B
cut B with ","
I is 0
while I is less than B
shout B at I+1
shout B at I
Build I up up

Try it online!
(Must manually copy-paste code)

Takes input as comma-separated string of numbers eg:

1,2,3,4,5,6

Outputs as newline-separated string of numbers eg:

2
1
4
3
6
5

Rockstar has no modulo, and no bitwise operators, so porting the other solutions is out of the question.

Explanation

Listen to B             ; Read input to B
cut B with ","          ; Split B on ","
I is 0                  ; Set I to 0
while I is less than B  ; While I < B.length
                        ; (Rockstar Arrays automatically coerce to length when used as a scalar)
shout B at I+1          ; Print B[I+1] with trailing newline
shout B at I            ; Print B[I] with trailing newline
Build I up up           ; Increment I twice (each 'up' increments)
\$\endgroup\$
3
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Python 3.8 (pre-release), 35 bytes

def f(m):*m[1:],_,m[::2]=*m,m[1::2]

Try it online!

In-place. Essentially a golfed version of m[1::2],m[::2]=m[::2],m[1::2]

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3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Is there something special about the 3.8 prerelease? \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2021 at 1:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ChrisBouchard it just happens to be the latest version available on tio. The walrss operator can be useful for glfing. \$\endgroup\$
    – loopy walt
    Nov 11, 2021 at 4:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ I guess TIO just hasn't updated their python in a while? 3.8 was fully released Oct 2019, 3.9 is the most recent full release, and 3.10 is the current pre-release. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2021 at 20:06

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