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The Challenge

Given a list of integers, the "bittiest" number among them is the one with the most bits on - that is, the largest amount of bits set to 1 in its 32-bit two's complement representation.

Write a function (or a program) that takes as input a list of integers between \$ -2^{31} \$ and \$ 2^{31}-1 \$ (the range of 32-bit signed integers) and returns as output the "bittiest" number among them.

You may assume the list has at least one item.

Test Cases

1, 2, 3, 4 => 3
123, 64, 0, -4 => -4
7, 11 => either 7 or 11
1073741824, 1073741823 => 1073741823

Good Luck!

This is code golf, so the shortest program in bytes wins.

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  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ If our language has no 32-bit signed integers should we accept integers (and perform manipulations) or may we accept a list of ones and zeros (what a 32-bit signed integer actually is under the hood)? \$\endgroup\$ Dec 19, 2020 at 20:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'd suggest adding larger test cases where it matters that we're using 32-bit signed integers for two's complement, and not say 16 or 64. \$\endgroup\$
    – xnor
    Dec 19, 2020 at 22:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Bip, one of the standard rules around here is not to assume anything about the functionality of a language. There are languages where integers are unsigned, other sizes, or don't exist at all. It's not necessarily a primitive data type. \$\endgroup\$
    – Xcali
    Dec 19, 2020 at 23:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think a clearer way to specify the challenge without making language assumptions is to say the input is a list of integers between -2^31 and 2^31-1, and we output one whose 32-bit signed representation has the most 1's. \$\endgroup\$
    – xnor
    Dec 20, 2020 at 0:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ @qwr But then its inverse would not be the "itty-bittiest number". \$\endgroup\$
    – beaker
    Dec 21, 2020 at 16:51

32 Answers 32

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K4, 15 bytes

Solution:

{*x@>+/+0b\:'x}

Explanation:

Pretty much exactly the same as the ngn/k solution:

{            x} / lamdba taking implicit argument x
        0b\:'   / convert (0b \:) each (') to binary representation
       +        / flip (transpose)
     +/         / sum (+) over (/)
    >           / indices to sort descending
  x@            / apply indices to input x
 *              / take the first
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Julia 1.0, 28 bytes

x->x[argmax(count_ones.(x))]

Try it online!

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