53
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In an earlier challenge I asked code golfers to produce strings which copy each character in a string. For example:

TThhiiss  iiss  ddoouubbllee  ssppeeaakk!!

This challenge is simply to detect if some text meets the definition of a double speak string.

  • There is an even number of characters.
  • When split into pairs, every pair consists of two of the same character.

The challenge

  • It's code golf, do it in few bytes.
  • Use any language you choose.
  • Please include a link to an online interpreter.
  • The code will accept some text.
  • For simplicity, the input will only consist of printable ASCII characters
  • It will return an indication of whether or not the input is double speak. It could be:
  • A boolean
  • Strings ('true', 'false', 'yes', 'no' etc)
  • Integers 0 or 1

Test Cases:

input -> output
aba -> false
abba -> false
aabb -> true
aaabb -> false
tthhiiss -> true
ttthhhiiisss -> false
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11
  • 9
    \$\begingroup\$ May we error on inputs of length < 2? \$\endgroup\$
    – cole
    Aug 6, 2019 at 16:06
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Suggested test case: abba which should be falsey \$\endgroup\$
    – Giuseppe
    Aug 6, 2019 at 16:29
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Suggested test case: aabbbb which should be truthy \$\endgroup\$ Aug 6, 2019 at 17:30
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @val Well, I'm not going to argue with standard I/O \$\endgroup\$
    – AJFaraday
    Aug 7, 2019 at 8:27
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ What about the empty string? \$\endgroup\$
    – PieCot
    Aug 7, 2019 at 21:04

94 Answers 94

61
\$\begingroup\$

Python 3, 24 bytes

lambda s:s[::2]==s[1::2]

Try it online!

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27
\$\begingroup\$

brainfuck, 20 bytes

Saved 1 byte thanks to Jo King.

+>,[>,[-<->]<[<],]<.

Try it online!

Readable output!

Takes input two characters at a time, and moves away from the 1 on the tape if any pair doesn't match. EOF is treated as 0 and thus handled automatically.

Output is a null byte if the string is not double speak, and 0x01 if it is. The readable version outputs these as characters at a cost of 14 bytes.

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0
18
\$\begingroup\$

MATL, 4 bytes

Heda

Input is a string, enclosed with single qoutes. Output is 0 for double speak, 1 otherwise.

Try it online!

Explanation

Consider input 'TThhiiss iiss ddoouubbllee ssppeeaakk!!' as an example.

H    % Push 2
     % STACK: 2
     % Implicit input (triggered because the next function requires two inputs): string 
     % STACK: 'TThhiiss  iiss  ddoouubbllee  ssppeeaakk!!', 2
e    % Reshape as a 2-column matrix of chars, in column-major order. Pads with char(0)
     % if needed. Note that char(0) cannot be present in the input
     % STACK: ['This is double speak!';
               'This is double speak!']
d    % Difference of each column
     % STACK: [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
a    % Any: gives 0 if and only if all elements are 0
     % STACK: 0
     % Implicit display
\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 13
    \$\begingroup\$ Um... who is "Heda"? :D \$\endgroup\$ Aug 6, 2019 at 16:01
  • 11
    \$\begingroup\$ "Heda" is German for "Hey! You!" \$\endgroup\$
    – QBrute
    Aug 9, 2019 at 12:47
14
\$\begingroup\$

05AB1E, 6 5 2 bytes

ιË

Input as a list of characters.

-3 bytes by porting @Shaggy's Japt answer, so make sure to upvote him!

Try it online or verify a few more test cases.

Explanation:

ι   # Uninterleave the (implicit) input-list of characters
    #  i.e. ["t","t","t","t","e","e","s","s","t","t","!","!","!"]
    #   → [["t","t","e","s","t","!","!"],["t","t","e","s","t","!"]]
 Ë  # Check if both inner lists are equal
    #  → 0 (falsey)
    # (after which the result is output implicitly)
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11
\$\begingroup\$

Japt, 4 bytes

ó r¶

Try it

ó r¶     :Implicit input of string
ó        :Uniterleave
  r      :Reduce by
   ¶     :  Testing equality

Alternative

ó
¥o

Try it

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10
\$\begingroup\$

Retina, 9 bytes

(.)\1

^$

Try it online.

Explanation:

Remove all pair of the same characters:

(.)\1

Check if there are no characters left:

^$
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2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ You can provide a more traditional output by using ^$ as your final stage. \$\endgroup\$
    – Neil
    Aug 6, 2019 at 16:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Neil Ah of course, thanks! That indeed looks better. I always think it's strange outputting false as truthy and true as falsey (but if it saves a byte and it's allowed, I will still use it). ;) But since this is an equal bytes solution outputting the expected results, this is better. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 6, 2019 at 16:42
10
\$\begingroup\$

Stax, 5 bytes

■◄┼$Δ

Run and debug it

Procedure:

  • Calculate run-lengths.
  • Get GCD of array.
  • Is even?
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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ahh, you got one that packs. Nice. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 6, 2019 at 18:20
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ i like this algorithm! \$\endgroup\$
    – Jonah
    Aug 6, 2019 at 18:51
8
\$\begingroup\$

Jelly, 3 bytes

ŒœE

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Hey I like this! It took me 80mns to do the same lol, I was like "hey let's learn Jelly now" then I learned. I was about to post this but looked if Jelly answers were already there... and then saw this ^^ My steps: ¹©s2L€=2Ạa®s2E€Ạ... ḢƝs2E€Ạ... but I couldn't manage to get what I wanted, and then I saw Œœ lol \$\endgroup\$ Aug 7, 2019 at 14:21
7
\$\begingroup\$

x86 machine code, 9 8 bytes

D1 E9       SHR  CX, 1          ; divide length in half
       L1:
AD          LODSW               ; load next two chars into AH/AL 
3A E0       CMP  AH, AL         ; compare AH and AL 
E1 FB       LOOPE L1            ; if equal, continue loop
C3          RET                 ; return to caller

Callable function. Input string in SI, input string length in CX. Output ZF if is double speak.

Or 14 bytes as a complete PC DOS executable:

B4 01       MOV  AH, 01H        ; DOS read char from STDIN (with echo) 
CD 21       INT  21H            ; read first char into AL
92          XCHG DX, AX         ; put first char into DL
B4 08       MOV  AH, 08H        ; DOS read char from STDIN (no echo) 
CD 21       INT  21H            ; read second char into AL
3A C2       CMP  AL, DL         ; compare first and second char 
74 F3       JE   -13            ; if the same, continue loop 
C3          RET                 ; otherwise exit to DOS 

Input is via STDIN, either pipe or interactive. Will echo the "de-doubled" input until a non-doubled character is detected, at which point will exit (maybe bending I/O rules a little bit, but this is just a bonus answer).

enter image description here

Build and test ISDBL2.COM using xxd -r:

00000000: b401 cd21 92b4 08cd 213a c274 f3c3       ...!....!:.t..

Original 24 bytes complete PC DOS executable:

D1 EE       SHR  SI, 1          ; SI to DOS PSP (080H) 
AD          LODSW               ; load string length into AL 
D0 E8       SHR  AL, 1          ; divide length in half 
8A C8       MOV  CL, AL         ; put string length into BL 
        CLOOP: 
AD          LODSW               ; load next two chars into AH/AL 
3A E0       CMP  AH, AL         ; compare AH and AL 
E1 FB       LOOPE CLOOP         ; if equal, continue loop
        DONE: 
B8 0E59     MOV  AX, 0E59H      ; BIOS tty function in AH, 'Y' in AL 
74 02       JZ   DISP           ; if ZF, result was valid double 
B0 4E       MOV  AL, 'N'        ; if not, change output char to N 
        DISP: 
B4 0E       MOV  AH, 0EH 
CD 10       INT  10H 
C3          RET                 ; return to DOS

Input from command line, output to screen 'Y' if double, 'N' if not.

enter image description here

Build and test ISDBL.COM using xxd -r:

00000000: d1ee add0 e88a c8ad 3ae0 e1fb b859 0e74  ........:....Y.t
00000010: 02b0 4eb4 0ecd 10c3                      ..N.....

Credits:

  • -2 bytes thx to @ErikF!
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2
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Suggest using LOOPE instead of JNZ/LOOP to save 2 bytes. \$\endgroup\$
    – ErikF
    Aug 7, 2019 at 16:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ErikF, brilliant! Completely forgot about that! \$\endgroup\$
    – 640KB
    Aug 7, 2019 at 16:17
6
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JavaScript, 28 bytes

s=>s.every((x,y)=>x==s[y|1])

Try it online!


23 bytes using wastl's regex

s=>/^((.)\2)*$/.test(s)

Try it online!

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3
6
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PHP, 58 56 bytes

function f($s){return!$s?:$s[0]==$s[1]&f(substr($s,2));}

Try it online!

As a recursive function.

PHP, 61 56 52 bytes

while(''<$l=$argn[$i++])$r|=$l!=$argn[$i++];echo!$r;

Try it online!

Or standalone program. Input string via STDIN, output is truthy (1) if it is double speak, and falsey (0) if it is not double speak.

-4 bytes thx to @Night2!

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2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ This appears to output 1 for a non-double speak string, as well as a double speak string. \$\endgroup\$
    – AJFaraday
    Aug 6, 2019 at 16:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @AJFaraday try now - is double speak, is not double speak \$\endgroup\$
    – 640KB
    Aug 6, 2019 at 16:07
6
\$\begingroup\$

Lua, 67 66 63 59 33 32 bytes

-25 bytes thanks to Giuseppe
-1 byte thanks to val

print(#(...):gsub("(.)%1","")<1)

Try it online!

Removes every doubled character, then checks if the result is empty.

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7
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ why not just i:gsub("(.)%1","") and check if i==""? \$\endgroup\$
    – Giuseppe
    Aug 8, 2019 at 16:26
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ this is 34 bytes, not totally sure it's valid since I've never written Lua before, but it appears to work. \$\endgroup\$
    – Giuseppe
    Aug 8, 2019 at 16:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ welcome to Code Golf Stack Exchange though! \$\endgroup\$
    – Giuseppe
    Aug 8, 2019 at 16:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ I assumed that "(.)%1" by itself included collisions, but it didn't occur to me that by replacing it once for all captures would be enough. Should I implement your solution or should you write your own answer? And thanks! \$\endgroup\$ Aug 8, 2019 at 17:03
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Nice idea! arg[1] can be replaced with (...) to save one byte. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 12, 2019 at 10:44
6
\$\begingroup\$

Malbolge (unlimited memory access variant), Around 4 megabytes

You asked the golfers, but for the second time forgot about the bowlers.

This is too big to include in the answer for obvious reason so here is gist link.

You might want to use the fast interpreter to test this program, as it's hellishly slow (hellishly, get it?). I'm going to include the TIO.run link after Dennis (hopefully) takes on my issue on TIO tracker.

// Edit: Nope, no TIO link as the answer size limit is 65536 bytes, and no abusing url shorteners because they just refuse to shorten it

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1
  • \$\begingroup\$ what is this monstrosity :) \$\endgroup\$
    – mkst
    Aug 13, 2019 at 16:45
5
\$\begingroup\$

Perl 5, 15 bytes

$_=/^((.)\2)*$/

Try it online!

Outputs 1 for double-speak, nothing for non-double-speak.

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5
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MathGolf, 2 bytes

½=

Try it online!

Basically the same as the 05AB1E answer, ½ splits the string into even and odd characters, then check for equality. Passes for the empty string.

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5
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Haskell, 28 23 bytes

f(x:y:z)|x==y=f z
f[]=1

Try it online!

Very straightforward. Double speak is only empty or a repeated character prepended to double speak.

Less straightforward now. Outputs via presence or absence of an error, per meta consensus; no error means double speak. Pattern matching fails when the first two characters differ or when there are an odd number of characters. Thanks to Laikoni for these savings!

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0
5
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PowerShell, 39 38 bytes

!$($args|?{+$p*($p="$_"[$p-eq$_])};$p)

Try it online!

where $p contains a previous char.

No recursion, no regex :). Takes input as a char-array via a splatting string (see TIO link).


PowerShell, 48 bytes

for(;$b-eq$a-and$args){$a,$b,$args=$args}$b-eq$a

Try it online!

No recursion, no regex and no pipe :D. It also takes input as a char-array via a splatting string. It uses $b-eq$a instead $a-eq$b for a case when a last char has #0 code.

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5
\$\begingroup\$

Shakespeare Programming Language, 204 156 bytes

-48 bytes thanks to Jo King (mostly by changing the output method)

A.Ajax,.Puck,.Act I:.Scene I:.[Exeunt][Enter Ajax and Puck]Ajax:Open mind.Puck:Open
mind.Is I worse zero?If soSpeak thy.Is you as big as I?If soLet usAct I.

Try it online!

Exits with error if the input is double speak, and with warning if it is not double speak (which is allowed by default).

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0
5
+50
\$\begingroup\$

Husk, 6 4 bytes

-2 bytes thanks to Razetime!

ETC2

Try it online!

Hooray for all ASCII solutions! Outputs a positive number if the input is doublespeak, otherwise zero.

  C2  Cut list into chunks of 2
 T    Transpose
E     Check if list has all the same elements (return length of list if so)
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3
  • \$\begingroup\$ -2 \$\endgroup\$
    – Razetime
    Feb 19, 2021 at 6:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Razetime That doesn't appear to check if the length is even \$\endgroup\$
    – Jo King
    Feb 19, 2021 at 7:11
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ this should work \$\endgroup\$
    – Razetime
    Feb 19, 2021 at 7:12
5
\$\begingroup\$

Vyxal, 2 bytes

y=

Try it Online!

Look ma, no Unicode!

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4
\$\begingroup\$

V (vim), 7 bytes

Óˆ±
ø^$

Try it online! or Verify test cases

Hexdump:

00000000: d388 b10a d85e 24                        .....^$

Just two regexes. Explanation:

Ó   " Remove all occurrences...
 ˆ  "   Any character
  ± "   Followed by itself
    "   This regex is actually just the compressed form of (.)\1
ø   " Count the number of matches
 ^$ "   An empty line
\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

Brachylog, 5 bytes

ġ₂z₂=

Try it online!

Succeeds or fails.

ġ₂       The at-most-length-2 chunks of the input,
  z₂     which have equal length, zipped together,
    =    are equal.
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4
\$\begingroup\$

INTERCAL, 192 bytes

PLEASE,1<-#2DOCOMEFROM(2)DOWRITEIN,1DO.5<-#1$',1SUB#1'~#256PLEASE(1)NEXTDOREADOUT#1DOGIVEUP(1)DO(1002)NEXTDO.5<-#1$',1SUB#2'~,1SUB#2DO(3)NEXTDOREADOUT#0PLEASEGIVEUP(3)DO(1002)NEXT(2)DOFORGET#2

Try it online!

Output is done with INTERCAL's native "butchered Roman numerals", so the true output of 1 prints as \nI\n, and the false output of 0 prints as _\n\n.

I don't feel like writing out a full explanation at the moment, but the ungolfed code is here, I lifted the control flow from something I wrote earlier, and the gist of what it does is read two characters at a time from the input through the usually unhelpful "Turing Tape" I/O until either the first resulting number is 256 (in which case the entire input has been validated and has even length, so it is double-speak), or the second resulting number is not 0 (in which case the second character is different from the first or does not exist, and the input is not double-speak).

I think I might be able to restructure this to cut down on redundancy, but I'm not quite feeling up to that at the moment either.

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

PowerShell, 64 59 bytes

filter f($n){$a,$b,$r=$n;$a-eq$b-and$(if($r){f $r}else{1})}

Try it online!

Recursive function, no regex. Takes input as a char-array (see TIO link). Peels off the first two elements into $a and $b, stores the remaining into $r. If we still have elements remaining, recurse along with $a -eq $b. Otherwise just check whether $a -eq $b. Output is implicit.

-5 bytes thanks to mazzy

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2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ de-duplicate Try it online! \$\endgroup\$
    – mazzy
    Aug 7, 2019 at 4:19
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @mazzy Thanks! I was missing the $ before the statement block and couldn't figure out why it wasn't working. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 7, 2019 at 12:37
4
\$\begingroup\$

Julia 1.0, 25 bytes

s->s[1:2:end]==s[2:2:end]

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ It's shorter to use a symbol instead of f, e.g !a=.... Or to use an anonymous function: s->... \$\endgroup\$
    – H.PWiz
    Aug 6, 2019 at 15:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, you're right. I fixed it \$\endgroup\$ Aug 7, 2019 at 15:15
4
\$\begingroup\$

J, 13 11 10 bytes

-:2#_2{.\]

Try it online!

-2 bytes thanks to Adám

-1 byte thanks to miles

TLDR explanation: Is the input the same as every other character of the input doubled?

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3
  • \$\begingroup\$ -:]#~2 0$~# \$\endgroup\$
    – Adám
    Aug 6, 2019 at 19:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ -:2#_2{.\] should save another byte \$\endgroup\$
    – miles
    Aug 7, 2019 at 22:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ very nice, thanks @miles \$\endgroup\$
    – Jonah
    Aug 7, 2019 at 22:56
4
\$\begingroup\$

Wolfram Language (Mathematica), 27 26 24 bytes

2==GCD@@Length/@Split@#&

Try it online!

        Length/@Split@#&    (*for the lengths of runs of characters*)
2==GCD@@                    (*check that they are all even*)
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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ You've excluded the necessary code to convert the string input into a list which can be fed to Split (i.e. the 11 bytes of Characters@) \$\endgroup\$
    – Anti Earth
    Aug 7, 2019 at 17:14
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @AntiEarth What's a string? \$\endgroup\$
    – att
    Aug 7, 2019 at 19:30
4
\$\begingroup\$

Keg, 19 17 characters

?{!1<|=[|0.(_)]}1

Explanation:

?             # read input

{             # while
    !1<       # stack length greater than 1?
|             # end of while condition and beginning of while block
    =         # compare the 2 top values in the stack
    [         # if (the condition is the top of stack)
    |         # end of then block and beginning of else block
        0.    # output 0
        (_)   # clear stack (discard top of stack in for loop stack length times)
    ]         # end if
}             # end while

1             # stack is already empty, push a truthy value

              # implicitly output the stack content if there was no explicit output

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
4
3
\$\begingroup\$

R, 53 34 bytes

-19 bytes thanks to Giuseppe

function(a)gsub("(.)\\1","",a)==""

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I think gsub("(.)\\1","",a)=="" would do the trick as well; many others use the same regex. \$\endgroup\$
    – Giuseppe
    Aug 6, 2019 at 18:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Giuseppe This whole regex thing is pretty new to me. Thanks. \$\endgroup\$
    – Robert S.
    Aug 6, 2019 at 18:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ R + pryr gets you a 32-byter trivially modified from this answer. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 6, 2019 at 18:19
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ If input can be taken as a vector, then function(a)!sum(rle(a)$l%%2) for 28 \$\endgroup\$
    – MickyT
    Aug 6, 2019 at 19:55
3
\$\begingroup\$

Brain-Flak, 26, 22 bytes

({<({}[{}])>{()<>}{}})

Try it online!

Outputs 1 for false and 0 for true.

Readable version:

({
    <({}[{}])>
    {
        ()
        <>
    }
    {}
})

I originally had this:

{
    ({}[{}])

    {
        <>([()])<>{{}}
    }{}
}
<>({}())

Which is 10 bytes longer.

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does 0/non0 count as a boolean? If so, you can do ({({}[{}]){{}}{}}) \$\endgroup\$
    – Riley
    Aug 6, 2019 at 18:15
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ lol at the "Readable version" - its so very readable :P \$\endgroup\$
    – Quinn
    Aug 6, 2019 at 18:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @riley No that's not valid. However, I found a better trick. \$\endgroup\$
    – DJMcMayhem
    Aug 6, 2019 at 18:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ @quinn Looks readable to me :P \$\endgroup\$
    – DJMcMayhem
    Aug 6, 2019 at 18:42

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