13
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Inspired by recent popularity of nandgame on TNB, and my own previous challenge.

Background

Densely packed decimal (DPD) is a way to efficiently store decimal digits in binary. It stores three decimal digits (000 to 999) in 10 bits, which is much more efficient than naive BCD (which stores one digit in 4 bits).

Conversion table

DPD is designed to easily convert between the bits and the digits by simple pattern matching from top to bottom. Each bit pattern defines how many high digits (8-9) the number has, where they are, and how to move the bits to form the decimal representation.

The following is the conversion table from 10 bits of DPD to three decimal digits. Each decimal digit is represented as 4-bit binary (BCD). Both sides are written left to right from the most significant digit to the least.

Bits                 =>  Decimal         (Digit range)

a b c d e f 0 g h i  =>  0abc 0def 0ghi  (0-7) (0-7) (0-7)

a b c d e f 1 0 0 i  =>  0abc 0def 100i  (0–7) (0–7) (8–9)
a b c g h f 1 0 1 i  =>  0abc 100f 0ghi  (0–7) (8–9) (0–7)
g h c d e f 1 1 0 i  =>  100c 0def 0ghi  (8–9) (0–7) (0–7)

g h c 0 0 f 1 1 1 i  =>  100c 100f 0ghi  (8–9) (8–9) (0–7)
d e c 0 1 f 1 1 1 i  =>  100c 0def 100i  (8–9) (0–7) (8–9)
a b c 1 0 f 1 1 1 i  =>  0abc 100f 100i  (0–7) (8–9) (8–9)
x x c 1 1 f 1 1 1 i  =>  100c 100f 100i  (8–9) (8–9) (8–9)

Notations

  • The lowercase letters a to i are the bits that are copied to the decimal representation.
  • 0 and 1 are the exact bits in the input or output bit patterns.
  • x bits are ignored in the conversion.

Task

Build a logical circuit using two-input NAND gates to convert 10 bits of DPD to 12 bits of BCD.

Examples

Emphasized bits are the pattern-matching bits.

DPD                    Decimal  BCD
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1    005      0000 0000 0101
            ^
0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1    063      0000 0110 0011
            ^
0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1    079      0000 0111 1001
            ^ ^ ^
0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0    090      0000 1001 0000
            ^ ^ ^
0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0    098      0000 1001 1000
      ^ ^   ^ ^ ^
1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0    592      0101 1001 0010
            ^ ^ ^
0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1    941      1001 0100 0001
            ^ ^ ^
1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1    879      1000 0111 1001
      ^ ^   ^ ^ ^
1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0    986      1001 1000 0110
      ^ ^   ^ ^ ^
0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1    999      1001 1001 1001
      ^ ^   ^ ^ ^
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1    999      1001 1001 1001
      ^ ^   ^ ^ ^

Scoring & winning criterion

The score is the number of two-input NAND gates used in your circuit. The lowest score wins.

You may define small components in terms of two-input NAND gates, and then use them in your final construction. If a component X includes N two-input NAND gates, each usage of X adds N to your score. For basic logic gates, this means:

  • NOT: +1
  • 2-input AND: +2
  • 2-input OR: +3
  • 2-input XOR: +4
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Rolled back Luis' edit because atomic-code-golf is a winning criterion tag and code-challenge is for questions which have a winning criterion not covered by other tags. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Taylor Nov 26 '18 at 15:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is still unclear to me. I think there needs to be further description of what the letters a to i mean and the process of converting. Go through the steps, rather than just showing examples and hoping we understand from that. \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Nov 26 '18 at 20:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007, maybe it's just clear to me because one of my languages is SML. That first code block is virtually a reference implementation in a pattern-matching language (although it works better in SMLNJ, which echos the result of each statement, than in MLton). \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Taylor Nov 26 '18 at 22:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @mbomb007 I tried to clarify the pattern-matching nature of the conversion table. Does it help? \$\endgroup\$ – Bubbler Nov 27 '18 at 0:04
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Bubbler Yeah, that's helpful \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Nov 27 '18 at 15:00
3
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65 62 60 58 NANDs

Taking the inputs as i0 to i9 and the outputs as o0 to o9, oa, ob we have

t0 = nand(i6, i7)
t1 = nand(t0, t0)
t2 = nand(i3, i4)
o0 = nand(nand(nand(t2, i3), t1), nand(nand(t2, i8), t1))
t3 = nand(o0, o0)
t4 = nand(i0, t3)
o1 = nand(t4, t4)
t5 = nand(i1, t3)
o2 = nand(t5, t5)
o3 = i2
# Score 13 for the first decimal digit

u0 = nand(i6, i8)
u1 = nand(u0, t0)
u2 = nand(i4, t2)
o4 = nand(nand(nand(u2, u0), u2), nand(u1, t0))
u3 = nand(o4, o4)
u4 = nand(o0, i8)
u5 = nand(u4, u4)
u6 = nand(u3, nand(nand(u5, i0), nand(u4, i3)))
o5 = nand(u6, u6)
u7 = nand(u3, nand(nand(u5, i1), nand(u4, i4)))
o6 = nand(u7, u7)
o7 = i5
# Score 20 for the second decimal digit

o8 = nand(nand(nand(nand(i4, i8), o0), t1), nand(nand(i6, u1), i6))
v2 = nand(o8, o8)
v3 = nand(i6, i6)
v4 = nand(i7, i7)
v5 = nand(v2, nand(nand(i6, nand(nand(i7, i0), nand(v4, i3))), nand(v3, i7)))
o9 = nand(v5, v5)
v6 = nand(v2, nand(nand(i6, nand(nand(i7, i1), nand(v4, i4))), nand(v3, i8)))
oa = nand(v6, v6)
ob = i9
# Score 25 for the third decimal digit

Python test framework to validate the correctness of the construction.

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2
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45 NANDs (or 43)

45 seems to be the absolute minimum, but it is possible to reach 43 NANDs by a trick: By assuming that the largest numbers are correctly encoded.

888, 889, 898, 899, 988, 989, 998, 999 are to be encoded with the 2 MSB as 00, requiring just 43 NANDs for decoding.

However, in the specification for decoding, they are specified to be ignored, meaning they can be anything. It is a reasonable assumption that this freer specification could require even fewer gates, but the opposite is true. 45 gates are required for this. This saving could give real benefits for real circuits.

I also found circuits that were significantly more efficient and faster, containing a few more gates.

No pencil drawn image of the circuit this time. Perhaps later.

The circuit is presented in obvious Verilog code, ready for running with test included.

Verilog code:

// Densely packed decimal (DPD) to decimal, circuit in Verilog.
// 45 NANDs only, which seems to be minimal.
//
// By Kim Øyhus 2019 (c) into (CC BY-SA 3.0.)
// This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
// Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit
// https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
//
// This is my entry to win this Programming Puzzle & Code Golf
// at Stack Exchange: 
// https://codegolf.stackexchange.com/questions/176557/densely-packed-decimal-dpd-to-decimal-with-logic-gates
//
// TASK:
// 3 decimal digits are stored in 10 bits in the DPD format,
// and this circuit transforms them into 3 decimal digits in
// 4 bits each, BCD format.
//
// 45 gates seem to be the smallest possible NAND circuit there is
// for this task, but I can get even lower by a trick, to 43:
// I assume that the largest numbers are correctly encoded.
//   888, 889, 898, 899, 988, 989, 998, 999 are to be encoded
// with the 2 MSB as 00, requiring just 43 NANDs for decoding.
//
//   However, in the specification for decoding, they are specified
// to be ignored, meaning they can be anything. It is a reasonable
// assumption that this freer specification could require even fewer
// gates, but the opposite is true. 45 gates are required for this.
// This saving could give real benefits for real circuits.
//
//   This DPD format seems to be used a lot for storing decimal numbers
// in computers and IO for ALUs, even though it is stored as 12 bits
// per 3 digits inside the ALUs and for other calculations.
// It is also used in many patents.


module decode1000 ( in_000, in_001, in_002, in_003, in_004, in_005, in_006, in_007, in_008, in_009, out000, out001, out002, out003, out004, out005, out006, out007, out008, out009, out010, out011 );
  input  in_000, in_001, in_002, in_003, in_004, in_005, in_006, in_007, in_008, in_009;
  output out000, out001, out002, out003, out004, out005, out006, out007, out008, out009, out010, out011;
  wire   wir000, wir001, wir002, wir003, wir004, wir005, wir006, wir007, wir008, wir009, wir010, wir011, wir012, wir013, wir014, wir015, wir016, wir017, wir018, wir019, wir020, wir021, wir022, wir023, wir024, wir025, wir026, wir027, wir028, wir029, wir030, wir031, wir032;

  nand gate000 ( wir000, in_007, in_007 );
  nand gate001 ( wir001, in_003, in_001 );
  nand gate002 ( wir002, in_002, in_003 );
  nand gate003 ( wir003, wir001, in_006 );
  nand gate004 ( wir004, wir002, in_001 );
  nand gate005 ( wir005, wir001, wir001 );
  nand gate006 ( wir006, in_005, in_001 );
  nand gate007 ( wir007, wir006, in_003 );
  nand gate008 ( out008, wir000, wir000 );
  nand gate009 ( wir008, wir004, wir007 );
  nand gate010 ( wir009, wir005, in_006 );
  nand gate011 ( wir010, wir007, wir007 );
  nand gate012 ( wir011, wir009, in_002 );
  nand gate013 ( wir012, wir011, wir009 );
  nand gate014 ( wir013, wir011, wir011 );
  nand gate015 ( wir014, in_008, wir013 );
  nand gate016 ( wir015, in_009, wir013 );
  nand gate017 ( wir016, wir010, wir014 );
  nand gate018 ( wir017, wir014, wir005 );
  nand gate019 ( wir018, wir015, wir015 );
  nand gate020 ( wir019, wir011, wir008 );
  nand gate021 ( wir020, wir019, wir006 );
  nand gate022 ( wir021, wir010, wir018 );
  nand gate023 ( wir022, wir020, wir004 );
  nand gate024 ( wir023, wir016, wir008 );
  nand gate025 ( out001, wir023, wir023 );
  nand gate026 ( out003, wir022, wir022 );
  nand gate027 ( wir024, wir005, wir008 );
  nand gate028 ( wir025, wir012, wir002 );
  nand gate029 ( wir026, wir019, in_003 );
  nand gate030 ( wir027, in_004, in_004 );
  nand gate031 ( out007, wir024, wir009 );
  nand gate032 ( out011, wir026, wir026 );
  nand gate033 ( wir028, wir017, in_005 );
  nand gate034 ( wir029, in_000, in_000 );
  nand gate035 ( wir030, wir026, in_008 );
  nand gate036 ( out005, wir028, wir028 );
  nand gate037 ( out009, wir030, wir030 );
  nand gate038 ( out000, wir029, wir029 );
  nand gate039 ( wir031, wir026, in_009 );
  nand gate040 ( out004, wir027, wir027 );
  nand gate041 ( out010, wir031, wir031 );
  nand gate042 ( wir032, out003, wir018 );
  nand gate043 ( out006, wir003, wir032 );
  nand gate044 ( out002, wir025, wir021 );
endmodule

module test;
   reg  [ 9:0] AB; // input DPD
   wire [11:0] C; // output BCD

  decode1000 U1 ( 
  .in_000 (AB[ 0]), 
  .in_001 (AB[ 1]), 
  .in_002 (AB[ 2]), 
  .in_003 (AB[ 3]), 
  .in_004 (AB[ 4]), 
  .in_005 (AB[ 5]), 
  .in_006 (AB[ 6]), 
  .in_007 (AB[ 7]), 
  .in_008 (AB[ 8]), 
  .in_009 (AB[ 9]), 
  .out000 ( C[ 0]),
  .out001 ( C[ 1]),
  .out002 ( C[ 2]),
  .out003 ( C[ 3]),
  .out004 ( C[ 4]),
  .out005 ( C[ 5]),
  .out006 ( C[ 6]),
  .out007 ( C[ 7]),
  .out008 ( C[ 8]),
  .out009 ( C[ 9]),
  .out010 ( C[10]),
  .out011 ( C[11])
  ); 

   initial  AB=0;  //unary=0;  binary=0
  always  #1  AB = AB+1;
  initial  begin
    $display("\t\ttime,\tinn 10bit   \tout 3x4bit"); 
    $monitor("%d,\t%b %b %b\t%b %b %b\t %d%d%d",$time, AB[9:7],AB[6:4],AB[3:0], C[11:8], C[7:4], C[3:0],  C[11:8], C[7:4], C[3:0]); 
  end 
  initial  #1023  $finish; 
endmodule

// How I run and test it:
// iverilog -o decode1000 decode1000.v
// vvp decode1000
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