9
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For a computer language, a reserved word is a word that cannot be used as an identifier, such as the name of a variable, function, or label. For other computer languages, keywords can be considered as the set of the language instructions.

Challenge

Using your language of choice, write a code in the chosen language that given a number between one and ten, 1<=n<=10, outputs any n reserved words (keywords) of the chosen language.

Specifics

  • If the chosen language is case sensitive the outputted keywords must be also.
  • If the chosen language is not case sensitive the outputted keywords can be in any case.
  • If the chosen language has less than 10 keywords saying p, the code must output all the reserved words for any n between p and 10.
  • If possible specify in the answer whether you consider operators as keywords or not.

Possible samples for Java (JDK10)

  • n=1 --> true
  • n=3 --> try new interface
  • n=4 --> continue this long break

Possible samples for ><>

  • n=1 --> >
  • n=3 --> > < ^
  • n=4 --> > < \ /

Possible samples for Brain-Flak

  • n=1 --> (
  • n=3 --> ( ) [ ]
  • n=9 --> ( ) [ ] { } < >

Rules

  • The input and output can be given in any convenient format.
  • No need to handle invalid input values, valid inputs are: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.
  • Either a full program or a function are acceptable. If a function, you can return the output rather than printing it.
  • If possible, please include a link to an on-line testing environment so other people can try out your code!
  • Standard loopholes are forbidden.
  • This is so all usual golfing rules apply, and the shortest code (in bytes) wins.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. \$\endgroup\$ – Mego Apr 19 '18 at 2:29
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ continue this long break I wish! That's why I'm on SE! \$\endgroup\$ – Stan Strum Apr 24 '18 at 18:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ the integers are reserved but I guess that would be a loophole. \$\endgroup\$ – snoram Aug 2 '18 at 13:56

33 Answers 33

6
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APL (Dyalog Unicode), 9 bytesSBCS

Full program. Prompts stdin for n (actually works for the range 0–29). APL keywords are single character symbols, so this prints n symbols to stdout.

⎕↑156↓⎕AV

Try it online!

⎕AV the Atomic Vector (i.e. the character set)

156↓ drop the first 156 elements

⎕↑ prompt for n and take that many elements from the above

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4
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Python 2, 25 bytes

lambda n:'=+*/%&^|<>'[:n]

An unnamed function accepting an integer in [1,10] which returns a string of single-byte binary operators.

Try it online!

The operators:

=  Assign
+  Addition
*  Multiplication
/  Division
%  Modulo
&  Bitwise-AND
^  Bitwise-XOR
|  Bitwise-OR
<  Less Than?
>  Greater Than?

If only actual keywords are allowed: 40 bytes

from keyword import*
lambda n:kwlist[:n]

An unnamed function accepting an integer in [1,10] which returns a list of strings.

Try it online!

The code should be quite straightforward - it defines a function taking one argument, n, using lambda n:... which returns the first n (...[:n]) of the known keywords using the standard library's keywords.kwlist (along with the standard golfing technique of import*).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ very minor point but surely = is "Assignment" as == is "Test for equality" \$\endgroup\$ – Noodle9 Apr 16 '18 at 15:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oops, good catch, thanks @Noodle9 \$\endgroup\$ – Jonathan Allan Apr 16 '18 at 16:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ Weird down-vote! Edit: Someone decided all the answers here deserve a down-vote. LOL \$\endgroup\$ – Jonathan Allan Apr 16 '18 at 20:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Certainly wasn't me - I liked your answer and upvoted it! :) \$\endgroup\$ – Noodle9 Apr 16 '18 at 20:44
3
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Charcoal, 16 bytes

✂”yPBG¤T⎚M↶↷J”⁰N

Too bad there isn't a preset variable for its own code-page in Charcoal.

Try it online.

Explanation:

Get a substring from index 0 to the input-number:

Slice("...",0,InputNumber)
✂”y...”⁰N

The string with 10 keywords:

”yPBG¤T⎚M↶↷J”
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  • \$\begingroup\$ I assume the fullwidth letters have consecutive character codes so you can just print the first n of those, which I can do in 8 bytes. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Jan 27 at 12:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Neil But are ten of those consecutive characters used as commands/operators? The for example isn't used at all right now, is it? (Except in combination with KA or ⌕A.) \$\endgroup\$ – Kevin Cruijssen Jan 28 at 7:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Actually is a command and operator, but not a good one, as it can cause confusion between Find and FindAll, but you then get stuck again at and , which only get used as modifiers, and then isn't used at all, which limits you. Greek letters, then? \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Jan 28 at 10:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Never mind, those are variables, not commands, I guess. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Jan 28 at 10:55
3
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Java 10, 83 72 bytes (keywords)

n->"do   if   for  int  new  try  var  byte case char ".substring(0,n*5)

Try it online.

Old 83 bytes answer:

n->java.util.Arrays.copyOf("do if for int new try var byte case char".split(" "),n)

Try it online.

Explanation:

n->                         // Method with integer parameter and String-array return-type
  java.util.Arrays.copyOf(  //  Create a copy of the given array:
    "do if for int new try var byte case char".split(" ") 
                            //   The keywords as String-array,
    ,n)                     //   up to and including the given `n`'th array-item

List of available keywords for Java 8. Java 10 has the keyword var in addition to these.


Java 8+, 30 bytes (operators)

n->"+-/*&|^~<>".substring(0,n)

Try it online.

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3
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Perl 5 -lp, 24 bytes

#!/usr/bin/perl -lp
$_=(grep!eval,a..zz)[$_]

Try it online!

Easy to extend to more and longer keywords, but you will need to do special casing starting at 4 letters because you will run into problems with dump, eval, exit,getc etc..

Of course just outputting operators and sigils is boring but shorter at 11 bytes:

#!/usr/bin/perl -lp
$_=chr$_+35

Try it online!

(I skipped # since it's unclear how I should classify it in the context of this challenge)

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3
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JavaScript (Node.js), 79 61 bytes

n=>'true int var for in if new try of do'.split` `.slice(0,n)

Try it online!

How :

n =>         // the input (will be an integer) between 1 and 10 (both inclusive)
    '        // beginning our string 
        true int var for in if new try of do'. // space separated reserved words
    split` `.        // turn it into an array every time there is a space we add to array
    slice(0,n)      // return elements of array starting from 0 and upto n

If using operators is allowed (most likely will be since they are reserved words) then :

JavaScript (Node.js), 26 25 bytes

n=>'|/^%+<&*-='.slice(-n)

Try it online!

Saved 8 bytes thanks to @Adam and 1 more byte thanks to @l4m2

How :

n =>     // input (integer from 0-9 inclusive)
    '|/^%+<&*-='.    // operators make a shorter string 
        slice(-n)   // outputs string chars from last upto n 
            // this works since all operators are single chars and not multi chars.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ n=>'|/^%+<&*-='.substr(-n) \$\endgroup\$ – Adám Apr 16 '18 at 11:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh yeah , Lol still golfing. Thanks @Adám. Appreciate it. \$\endgroup\$ – Muhammad Salman Apr 16 '18 at 11:46
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ I don't think int is a "reserved word" as per the definition in the challenge. You can certainly name a variable int in JavaScript. \$\endgroup\$ – kamoroso94 Apr 16 '18 at 22:54
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ If I remember well, int is reserved as a possible future keyword by the ECMAScript specification. \$\endgroup\$ – BNilsou Apr 17 '18 at 12:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why substr instead of slice? \$\endgroup\$ – l4m2 Apr 17 '18 at 16:21
3
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Ruby, 22 bytes

->n{'+-*/%&|^<>'[0,n]}

Try it online!

-2 bytes thanks to @benj2240

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok. Will update my answer. \$\endgroup\$ – user79855 Apr 16 '18 at 12:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ String#[] has a two-argument overload you can use for -2 bytes: [0,n] \$\endgroup\$ – benj2240 Apr 16 '18 at 21:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ p is not a reserved word, & should work \$\endgroup\$ – Asone Tuhid Apr 17 '18 at 16:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @AsoneTuhid : p is used for printing as well , but You are right I can probably replace it. Thanks \$\endgroup\$ – user79855 Apr 17 '18 at 18:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @I'mnoone Yes but it's a method, you can redefine it and you can create a variable named p which will be accessed instead of calling the method with no variables (p = 1; p p #=> 1) \$\endgroup\$ – Asone Tuhid Apr 17 '18 at 18:27
2
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Pyth, 4 bytes

>QPG

Try it online!

Unfortunately, many of the letters are variables (GHJKNQTYZbdkz).

p  <any>                  Print A, with no trailing newline. Return A.
q  <any> <any>            A == B
r  <str> 0                A.lower()
r  <str> 1                A.upper()
r  <str> 2                A.swapcase()
r  <str> 3                A.title()
r  <str> 4                A.capitalize()
r  <str> 5                string.capwords(A)
r  <str> 6                A.strip() - Remove whitespace on both sides of A.
r  <str> 7                Split A, eval each part.
r  <seq> 8                Run length encode A. Output format [[3, 'a'], [2, 'b'], [1, 'c'], [1, 'd']].
r  <str> 9                Run length decode A. Input format '3a2bcd' -> 'aaabbcd'
r  <seq> 9                Run length decode A. Input format [[3, 'a'], [2, 'b'], [1, 'c'], [1, 'd']].
r  <int> <int>            Range, half inclusive. range(A, B) in Python, or range(A, B, -1).
r  <str> <str>            String range. r(C(A), C(B)), then convert each int to string using C.
r  <int> <seq>            r(B, A)
s  <col(str)>             Concatenate. ''.join(A)
s  <col>                  reduce on +, base case []. (Pyth +)
s  <cmp>                  Real part. A.real in Python.
s  <num>                  Floor to int. int(A) in Python.
s  <str>                  Parse as int. "" parses to 0. int(A) in Python.
t  <num>                  A - 1.
t  <seq>                  Tail. A[1:] in Python.
u  <l:GH> <seq/num> <any> Reduce B from left to right, with function A(_, _) and C as starting value. G, H -> N, T ->. A takes current value, next element of B as inputs. Note that A can ignore either input.
u  <l:GH> <any> <none>    Apply A(_, _) until a result that has occurred before is found. Starting value B. A takes current value, iteration number as inputs.
v  <str>                  Eval. eval(A) without -s, ast.literal_eval(A) with -s (online). literal_eval only allows numeric, string, list, etc. literals, no variables or functions.
w                         Take input. Reads up to newline. input() in Python 3.
x  <int> <int>            Bitwise XOR. A ^ B in Python.
x  <lst> <any>            First occurrence. Return the index of the first element of A equal to B, or -1 if none exists.
x  <str> <str>            First occurrence. Return the index of the first substring of A equal to B, or -1 if none exists.
x  <non-lst> <lst>        All occurrences. Returns a list of the indexes of elements of B that equal A.
x  <str> <non-lst>        First occurence. Return the index of the first substring of A equal to str(B), or -1 if none exists.
y  <seq>                  Powerset. All subsets of A, ordered by length.
y  <num>                  A * 2.
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2
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Jelly, 3 bytes

ØAḣ

A monadic link accepting an integer and returning a list of characters.

Try it online!

The resulting characters are all monadic atoms in Jelly's code-page:

A   Absolute value.
B   Convert from integer to binary.
C   Complement; compute 1 − z.
D   Convert from integer to decimal.
E   Check if all elements of z are equal.
F   Flatten list.
G   Attempt to format z as a grid.
H   Halve; compute z ÷ 2.
I   Increments; compute the differences of consecutive elements of z.
J   Returns [1 … len(z)].

How?

ØAḣ - Link: integer n (in [1,10])
ØA  - yield uppercase alphabet = ['A','B','C',...,'Z']
  ḣ - head to index n
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh - I see someone decided to down-vote ALL the answers; how sporting! \$\endgroup\$ – Jonathan Allan Apr 16 '18 at 20:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Think this answer deserves an upvoted too! :) \$\endgroup\$ – Noodle9 Apr 16 '18 at 20:58
2
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C# .NET, 76 62 bytes (keywords)

n=>"as  do  if  in  is  for int new out ref ".Substring(0,n*4)

Try it online.

Old 76 bytes answer:

using System.Linq;n=>"as do if in is for int new out ref".Split(' ').Take(n)

Try it online.

Explanation:

using System.Linq;  // Required import for Take
n=>                 // Method with integer parameter and IEnumerable<string> return-type
  "as do if in is for int new out ref".Split(' ') 
                    //  The keywords as string-array,
  .Take(n)          //  and return the first `n` items

List of available keywords in C# .NET.


C# .NET, 30 bytes (operators)

n=>"+-/*&|^~<>".Substring(0,n)

Try it online.

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2
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Charm, 52 bytes

This outputs all of the reserved words in Charm.

" [  := :: \"   " 0 2 copyfrom 3 * substring pstring

Since all non-recursive code in Charm is inline-able, this is an anonymous function. Call like this:

4 " [  := :: \"   " 0 2 copyfrom 3 * substring pstring 

(outputs [ := :: ", the only four reserved words.)


Giving this function a name adds 5 bytes:

f := " [  := :: \"   " 0 2 copyfrom 3 * substring pstring
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2
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Brain-Flak, 122 120 bytes

({}<((((((((((((((()()){}()){}){}){})())[][]){}())()())[(([][]){}){}()])()())){}())[()()])>){({}<{({}<>)(<>)}{}>[()])}<>

Try it online!

Just doing my part to fill out the example languages. Outputs ()[]<>}{, popping off the front for numbers less than 8.

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2
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Unary, 6072204020736072426436 378380483266268 bytes

+[>+<+++++]>---. (0o12602122222703334)

Thank Jo King for 99.999993768646738908474177860631% reducing

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Is the bytes number correct? \$\endgroup\$ – mdahmoune Apr 16 '18 at 19:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @mdahmoune I think so \$\endgroup\$ – l4m2 Apr 16 '18 at 19:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ !!It’s very big \$\endgroup\$ – mdahmoune Apr 16 '18 at 21:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ @mdahmoune It's actually pretty 'small' for Unary. ;) If you search for other Unary or Lenguage answers here on PPCG there are some much, much larger than this. \$\endgroup\$ – Kevin Cruijssen Apr 17 '18 at 6:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does ,[.-] in Lenguage fits the requirement? \$\endgroup\$ – l4m2 Apr 17 '18 at 13:14
2
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Ruby, 50 49 bytes

->n{%w[do if or in end not for def nil and][0,n]}

Try it online!

Not using any operators (+, |, etc.).

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2
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Ruby, 71 68 bytes

->n{(?a..'zzz').reject{|x|begin;eval x+'=n';rescue Object;end}[0,n]}

Okay, not the shortest approach, but too fun not to post. Programmatically finds all strings of up to three lowercase letters that can't be assigned to. There happen to be exactly 10: ["do", "if", "in", "or", "and", "def", "end", "for", "nil", "not"].

Edit: Saved 3 bytes thanks to Asone Tuhid.

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2
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Japt, 3 bytes

Returns a string, with each individual character being a method name in Japt.

;îC

Try it

;C is the lowercase alphabet and î repeats it until its length equals the input.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @Downvoter, you forgot to leave a comment! :\ \$\endgroup\$ – Shaggy Apr 17 '18 at 16:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ It seems that someone has down-voted all answers :/ \$\endgroup\$ – mdahmoune Apr 18 '18 at 7:06
2
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Chicken, 7 bytes

chicken

Not a serious answer. But it has to be here.

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2
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R, 76 62 60 57 bytes

12 bytes saved thanks to MickyT

5 bytes saved thanks to snoram

cat(c("if","in",1:0/0,"for",F,T,"NULL","else")[1:scan()])

Try it online!

There aren't many Reserved words in R but these are among the shortest to encode. There are only 9 here, but if an input of 10 is given, a missing value NA is appended to the end of the list and printed.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Some quick little savings \$\endgroup\$ – MickyT Aug 1 '18 at 23:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MickyT thanks! Realized I could store "NaN" as 0/0 or NaN as well for another couple bytes. \$\endgroup\$ – Giuseppe Aug 2 '18 at 13:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ replace 1/0,0/0 with 1:0/0. \$\endgroup\$ – snoram Aug 2 '18 at 13:59
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @snoram ah, excellent! And welcome to PPCG! I'm looking forward to your first answer here! Have a look at tips for golfing in R and feel free to ping me in chat! :-) \$\endgroup\$ – Giuseppe Aug 2 '18 at 14:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks! @Giuseppe btw. 1[1:2] returns [1] 1 NA => you can skip NAin the original vector... if user input is 10 it will get appended at the end. \$\endgroup\$ – snoram Aug 2 '18 at 14:08
1
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Python 2, 64 bytes

lambda n:'as if def del for try elif else from pass'.split()[:n]

Try it online!


Python 2, 57 bytes (with operators)

lambda n:'as if in is or and def del for not'.split()[:n]

Try it online!


keywords
operators

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ a function is 2 bytes shorter \$\endgroup\$ – ovs Apr 16 '18 at 12:01
1
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Whitespace, 84 bytes

[S S S T    S S S S S N
_Push_32][S N
S _Duplicate][T N
S S _Print_as_character][S N
S _Duplicate][T N
T   T   _Read_STDIN_as_integer][T   T   T   _Retrieve][S S S T  N
_Push_1][T  S S T   _Subtract][S N
S _Duplicate][N
T   S N
_If_0_Jump_to_Label_EXIT][S S S T   S S T   N
_Push_9][T  N
S S Print_as_character][S S S T N
_Push_1][T  S S T   _Subtract][N
T   S N
_If_0_Jump_to_Label_EXIT][S S S T   S T S N
_Push_10][T N
S S _Print_as_character][N
S S N
_Create_Label_EXIT]

Letters S (space), T (tab), and N (new-line) added as highlighting only.
[..._some_action] added as explanation only.

Whitespace only contains three valid 'keywords': spaces, tabs and new-lines.

Explanation in pseudo-code:

Print space
Integer i = STDIN as integer - 1
If i is 0:
  Exit program
Else:
  Print tab
  i = i - 1
  If i is 0:
    Exit program
  Else:
    Print new-line
    Exit program

Example runs:

Input: 1

Command       Explanation                 Stack      Heap      STDIN    STDOUT   STDERR

SSSTSSSSSN    Push 32                     [32]
SNS           Duplicate top (32)          [32,32]
TNSS          Print as character          [32]                          <space>
SNS           Duplicate top (32)          [32,32]
TNTT          Read STDIN as integer       [32]       {32:1}    1
TTT           Retrieve                    [1]        {32:1}
SSSTN         Push 1                      [1,1]      {32:1}
TSST          Subtract top two (1-1)      [0]        {32:1}
SNS           Duplicate top (0)           [0,0]      {32:1}
NTSN          If 0: Jump to Label_EXIT    [0]        {32:1}
NSSN          Create Label_EXIT           [0]        {32:1}
                                                                                 error

Program stops with an error: No exit defined.
Try it online (with raw spaces, tabs and new-lines only).
Outputs a single space.

Input: 2

Command       Explanation                 Stack      Heap      STDIN    STDOUT   STDERR

SSSTSSSSSN    Push 32                     [32]
SNS           Duplicate top (32)          [32,32]
TNSS          Print as character          [32]                         <space>
SNS           Duplicate top (32)          [32,32]
TNTT          Read STDIN as integer       [32]       {32:2}    2
TTT           Retrieve                    [2]        {32:2}
SSSTN         Push 1                      [2,1]      {32:2}
TSST          Subtract top two (2-1)      [1]        {32:2}
SNS           Duplicate top (1)           [1,1]      {32:2}
NTSN          If 0: Jump to Label_EXIT    [1]        {32:2}
SSSTSSTN      Push 9                      [1,9]      {32:2}
TNSS          Print as character          [1]        {32:2}             \t
SSSTN         Push 1                      [1,1]      {32:2}
TSST          Subtract top two (1-1)      [0]        {32:2}
NTSN          If 0: Jump to Label_EXIT    []         {32:2}
NSSN          Create Label_EXIT           []         {32:2}
                                                                                 error

Program stops with an error: No exit defined.
Try it online (with raw spaces, tabs and new-lines only).
Outputs a space, followed by a tab.

Input: 3 (or higher)

Command       Explanation                 Stack      Heap      STDIN    STDOUT   STDERR

SSSTSSSSSN    Push 32                     [32]
SNS           Duplicate top (32)          [32,32]
TNSS          Print as character          [32]                          <space>
SNS           Duplicate top (32)          [32,32]
TNTT          Read STDIN as integer       [32]       {32:3}    3
TTT           Retrieve                    [3]        {32:3}
SSSTN         Push 1                      [3,1]      {32:3}
TSST          Subtract top two (3-1)      [2]        {32:3}
SNS           Duplicate top (2)           [2,2]      {32:3}
NTSN          If 0: Jump to Label_EXIT    [2]        {32:3}
SSSTSSTN      Push 9                      [2,9]      {32:3}
TNSS          Print as character          [2]        {32:3}             \t
SSSTN         Push 1                      [2,1]      {32:3}
TSST          Subtract top two (2-1)      [1]        {32:3}
SSSTSTSN      Push 10                     [1,10]     {32:3}
TNSS          Print as character          [1]        {32:3}             \n
NSSN          Create Label_EXIT           []         {32:3}
                                                                                 error

Program stops with an error: No exit defined.
Try it online (with raw spaces, tabs and new-lines only).
Outputs a space, followed by a tab, followed by a new-line.

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1
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Brain-Flak, 118 bytes

({}<(((((((((((()()()()()){}){}){})())(([][][])){}{}())()())([][][])[]{})()())[][][][][])()())>){({}<({}<>)<>>[()])}<>

Try it online!

# Push stuffs under the counter
({}<(((((((((((()()()()()){}){}){})())(([][][])){}{}())()())([][][])[]{})()())[][][][][])()())>)

# While True
{
    # Decrement the counter
    ({}<

        # Toggle a character
        ({}<>)<>
    >[()])
}

# Display alternate stack
<>
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  • \$\begingroup\$ This prints extra null bytes for 9 and 10 \$\endgroup\$ – Jo King Apr 16 '18 at 22:51
1
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05AB1E, 2 bytes

Try it online!


Every letter of the alphabet is a command in 05AB1E.

All this does is prints the first N letters of the alphabet.

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1
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><>, 11 10 9 bytes

1-:n:0=?;

Try it online!

Turned out the simplest solution was the best. This outputs the first n numbers, starting from 0.

Old 10 byte solutions

"'r{$[>o<3

Try it online!

Some 10 byte alternatives:

  • "':1+{[>o<
  • "r:n[~>o<a
  • "'a{[>o<bc
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1
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Haskell, 22 bytes

(`take`"';,=\"@\\`|~")

Try it online!

Thanks to @Angs for catching keyword errors.

I felt like this could be shorter by generating the string instead of explicitly defining it, but I couldn't find a range of 10 consecutive ASCII characters that are Haskell keywords (I found some that are close, if you count language extension keywords). If there is one, you could reduce it to 15 bytes with this, replacing % with the starting character:

(`take`['%'..])

Without symbolic keywords:

Haskell, 58 bytes

(`take`words"of in do let then else case data type class")

Try it online!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ ! isn't reserved, e.g. let a!b=a+b is fine \$\endgroup\$ – Angs Apr 17 '18 at 16:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oops, you're right. Fixed both parts, since as is also a valid identifier. \$\endgroup\$ – user9549915 Apr 17 '18 at 16:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ . isn't reserved either - none of the other operators in prelude like + etc are - see this \$\endgroup\$ – Angs Apr 17 '18 at 16:41
1
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C (gcc), 62 60 bytes

-2 thanks to GPS

f(n){puts("autocasecharelseenumgotolongvoidint do"+40-4*n);}

Try it online!

I mean... there was never any requirement to actually separate the keywords.

In case I misread - or you're more interested in something more in the spirit of the question - here's an alternate version with separating spaces:

C (gcc), 69 bytes

f(n){puts("auto case char else enum goto long void int  do"+50-5*n);}

Try it online!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you need the two spaces after do? \$\endgroup\$ – Jo King Apr 17 '18 at 13:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JoKing Yeah, otherwise garbage characters could be written. \$\endgroup\$ – gastropner Apr 17 '18 at 14:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ You could trim spaces after do if you use string output functions. 69 bytes: Tio \$\endgroup\$ – GPS Apr 17 '18 at 22:04
1
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Tcl, 37 bytes

puts [lrange [info commands] 1 $argv]

Try it online!

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1
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Taxi, 509 bytes

"[]a lrnsew" is waiting at Writer's Depot. Go to Post Office: w 1 l 1 r 1 l. Pickup a passenger going to The Babelfishery. Go to The Babelfishery: s 1 l 1 r.Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.Go to Writer's Depot: n 1 l, 1 l, 2 l.Pickup a passenger going to Chop Suey.Go to Chop Suey: n, 3 r, 3 r.[a]Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.Go to Post Office: s 1 r 1 l 2 r 1 l.Go to The Underground: n 1 r 1 l.Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.Go to Chop Suey: n 2 r 1 l.Switch to plan "a".

This takes a hardcoded string at the top, and prints "n" characters from it, and then errors with "error: no outgoing passengers found".

The string contains:

  1. [ and ], the characters used to declare a plan
  2. a used in the "Pickup a passenger ..." syntax.
  3. The space character, which is required to separate pieces of syntax
  4. l and r, short for "left" and "right", used to tell the driver which way to turn.
  5. n, s, e, and w, the four directions.

I believe all of those count as one character keywords. Ungolfed:

"[]a lrnsew" is waiting at Writer's Depot.
Go to Post Office: west, 1st left, 1st right, 1st left.
Pickup a passenger going to The Babelfishery.
Go to The Babelfishery: south, 1st left, 1st right.
Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.
Go to Writer's Depot: north, 1st left, 1st left, 2nd left.
Pickup a passenger going to Chop Suey.
Go to Chop Suey: north, 3rd right, 3rd right.
[print character]
Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.
Go to Post Office: south, 1st right, 1st left, 2nd right, 1st left.
Go to The Underground: north, 1st right, 1st left.
Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.
Go to Chop Suey: north, 2nd right, 1st left.
Switch to plan "print character".
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1
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J, 15 bytes

[:u:46,"0~65+i.

Try it online!

Gives an array of strings A. to J..

Dotted words in J act as built-ins (such as a. or A.) or control structures (such as if. or do.), or simply throw spelling error. None of them can be used as identifiers.

Less interesting, 15 bytes

{.&'!#$%^*-+=|'

Try it online!

Gives some of the 10 one-byte verbs.

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1
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Bash and shell utils 20 bytes

compgen -b|head -$1

You can save that in a file with execute permissions (builtins) and run it under bash like this:

$ ./builtins 5
 .
 : 
 [
 alias 
 bg  

Outputs the first N bash built ins.

If you are running some shell other than bash, you will need the shebang #!/bin/bash line at the start of the file, for +12b

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1
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QBasic, 60 bytes

INPUT n
?LEFT$("CLS FOR DEF RUN DIM PUT GET SUB END IF",n*4)

This answer fits the spirit of the question best, I believe: outputting alphabetic reserved keywords with spaces in between. I don't think symbolic operators really count as "words" in QBasic, but for completeness, here's a 30-byte answer using operators:

INPUT n
?LEFT$("+-*/\^=><?",n)
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