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Satan-Primes

who are they?
they are Primes containing 666
these are Satan-Primes:[46663,266677,666599,666683,616669]
these are NOT :[462667,665669,36363631,555]

Plot

Every number bigger than 6661 has Satan-Primes behind him

The Challenge

Given an integer n>6661 find the Satan-Prime behind (or equal) and closest to itself.

Examples

Integer n=30000 has 3 Satan-Primes(SP) behind it:[6661, 16661, 26669].
Your code must return 26669 which is the closest behind it

Test Cases

Input->Output

6662->6661    
10000->6661    
66697->66697 (a SP returns himself)  
328765->326663  
678987->676661
969696->966677

Rules

Yor code should work for any n in the range of your language.

This is , so the shortest answer in bytes wins!

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ define "about a minute." Is it +- 30 seconds? I personally think that 30 minutes and a minute don't differ that much... Also bonuses are generally frowned upon... also I think this might have been better as an output the nth satan prime challenge... \$\endgroup\$ – Socratic Phoenix Aug 25 '17 at 16:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ ok ok people... bonus will be removed... \$\endgroup\$ – user73398 Aug 25 '17 at 16:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hope you don't mind the edit I made to the challenge title. \$\endgroup\$ – Shaggy Aug 25 '17 at 17:29
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @Shaggy What point does the title change serve...? \$\endgroup\$ – Conor O'Brien Aug 26 '17 at 1:40
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @ConorO'Brien Rhyming and appearing archaic, I presume. \$\endgroup\$ – wizzwizz4 Aug 26 '17 at 15:17

22 Answers 22

7
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Mathematica, 82 bytes

Last@Select[Prime@Range@PrimePi@#,!FreeQ[Subsequences[IntegerDigits@#],{6,6,6}]&]&
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Wait, you mean there isn't a built-in for this one? \$\endgroup\$ – Nic Hartley Aug 27 '17 at 16:38
7
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Neim, 9 bytes

>ͻ:D+6S𝕚÷

Explanation:

>         Increment input
 ͻ        Start infinite loop
  :        Previous prime
   D       Duplicate
    +6     Push 666
      S    Swap
       𝕚   See if 666 is a substring of the top of the stack
        ÷  If true, break

Try it online!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So there's really a builtin to push "66 prepended to a digit"? O_O Neim has progressed. \$\endgroup\$ – Erik the Outgolfer Aug 25 '17 at 19:10
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ How does +6 push 666? Or is Neim just that metal? \$\endgroup\$ – Robert Fraser Aug 26 '17 at 5:58
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ @RobertFraser Apparently +x means 612 + character code of x. The code of 6 happens to be 54, so 612+54=666. \$\endgroup\$ – fergusq Aug 26 '17 at 8:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ @EriktheOutgolfer Well, Neim can represent all three digits numbers and a few four digits using two bytes. \$\endgroup\$ – Okx Aug 26 '17 at 12:32
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @EriktheOutgolfer '\+* = 100,356,612,868 (plus the ordinal of the following char that is) \$\endgroup\$ – Jonathan Allan Aug 26 '17 at 13:13
7
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Jelly, 10 9 bytes

Saved 10% thanks to @Dennis!

ÆRwÐf666Ṫ

Try it online!

Explanation

ÆR          # All primes in range [2, input]
   Ðf      # Keep those which satisfy
  w        # truthy if y is in x
     666   #           ^ (this is y)
        Ṫ  # Tail (take the last element)
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Alternative: ÆRẇ@Ðf666Ṁ \$\endgroup\$ – Mr. Xcoder Aug 25 '17 at 17:30
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ I love that the Tail (right after 666) looks like a cross. \$\endgroup\$ – kaine Aug 25 '17 at 20:11
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ w should work instead of ẇ@. \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Aug 26 '17 at 3:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Dennis s/sh/w/ of course it works :p \$\endgroup\$ – Erik the Outgolfer Aug 26 '17 at 13:17
5
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Pyth, 15 14 bytes

Saved 1 byte with help from Dave.

Memory errors for 969696 and anything higher on my machine, but it is fine if it is given enough memory.

ef&/`T*3\6P_TS

Try it here or check out the Test Suite.


How?

ef&/`T*3\6P_TSQ - Full program, with implicit input (Q) at the end

             SQ - Range [1,Q]
 f              - Filter.
          P_T   - Is prime?
  &             - And
   /`T*3\6      - It contains 666.
e               - Last element.
                - Implicitly output the result.

Pyth, 14 bytes

ef/`T*\63fP_TS

Try it here!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ 14 bytes: ef&/`T*3\6P_TS \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Aug 25 '17 at 17:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ I added the ending Q by mistake, its 14 \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Aug 25 '17 at 17:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ "666" is a less efficient way to describe the string 666 that *3\6 \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Aug 25 '17 at 17:11
4
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05AB1E, 11 bytes

ƒNpN666å*iN

Try it online!

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4
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Bash + Core Utils, 51 49 Bytes

seq $1|tac|factor|awk 'NF==2&&/666/&&!a--&&$0=$2'

Takes command line argument. Can be quite slow with larger numbers.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This outputs all "satan primes" down to 6661, but it should only be printing the closest one below the input: try it online. One fix would be to just add |head -1 to the end. \$\endgroup\$ – Justin Mariner Aug 26 '17 at 2:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JustinMariner lol, whoops, fixed it \$\endgroup\$ – markasoftware Aug 26 '17 at 4:25
4
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Mathematica, 64 62 61 53 bytes

#//.i_/;!PrimeQ@i||ToString@i~StringFreeQ~"666":>i-1&

-1 byte thanks to @KellyLowder

-8 bytes (wow) thanks to @Notatree

Explanation

Take an input. We decrement it under these conditions:

  • the input is not prime, OR

  • the digits of the inputs does not contain three 6s in a row.

We repeat that until a Satan prime is reached.

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  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Very nice. You can lose one more _ at the end since a prime can't end in 6. \$\endgroup\$ – Kelly Lowder Aug 25 '17 at 20:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @KellyLowder good point \$\endgroup\$ – JungHwan Min Aug 26 '17 at 4:13
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ This is even shorter with strings: #//.i_/;!PrimeQ@i||ToString@i~StringFreeQ~"666":>i-1& \$\endgroup\$ – Not a tree Aug 26 '17 at 5:44
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Notatree wow! nice! \$\endgroup\$ – JungHwan Min Aug 26 '17 at 15:05
3
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Perl 5, 47 bytes

46 bytes of code + 1 for -p

{$f=0|sqrt;1while$_%$f--;/666/*!$f||$_--*redo}

Try it online!

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3
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Japt, 14 bytes

õ fj w æ_sø666

Test it

Seeing as there was a 50% time-based bonus: Completes test case 969696 in under half a second.


Explanation

Implicit input of integer U.

õ

Generate an array of integers from 1 to U.

fj

Filter (f) primes.

w

Reverse.

æ_

Return the first element that returns a truthy value (in this case 1) when passed through a function that checks if ...

sø666

The integer converted to a string (s) contains (ø) 666.


Faster Alternative, 15 bytes

Again, seeing as there was originally a time-based bonus, here's an alternative, and much faster, solution which I can't seem to golf any further.

U-@j *U´sø666}a

Test it

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2
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PowerShell, 128 bytes

param($n)function f($a){for($i=2;$a-gt1){if(!($a%$i)){$i;$a/=$i}else{$i++}}}for(){if($n-match666-and($n-eq(f $n))){$n;exit}$n--}

Try it online!

PowerShell doesn't have any prime factorization built-ins, so this borrows code from my answer on Prime Factors Buddies.

We take input $n, then declare a new function f that calculates out the factors of input $a. If the input $a is prime, then this will return just $a.

The main part of the program is the infinite for() loop. Inside the loop, we check if $n -matches against 666 and whether $n is prime (i.e., $n matches all of the factors of $n). If it is, we place $n on the pipeline and exit, with implicit output. Otherwise, we decrement $n-- and continue the loop.

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2
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Python 2, 77 76 bytes

Edit: -1 byte thanks to @Mr.Xcoder

Slow running time, runs in O(n^2)

lambda x:max(q for q in range(x+1)if"666"in`q`*all(q%t for t in range(2,q)))

Try it online!

Another 76 bytes solution

lambda x:max(q*("666"in`q`*all(q%t for t in range(2,q)))for q in range(x+1))

Try it online!

With SymPy 73 bytes

lambda x:max(q for q in primerange(0,x+1)if"666"in`q`)
from sympy import*

Try it online!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ 76 bytes: lambda x:max(q for q in range(x+1)if"666"in`q`*all(q%t for t in range(2,q))) - use max() instead of [][-1] \$\endgroup\$ – Mr. Xcoder Aug 25 '17 at 17:18
2
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PowerShell, 71 69 64 bytes

param($s)for(;$s-notmatch666-or(2..($s/2)|?{!($s%$_)});$s--){}$s

Try it online!

  • 328765 takes ~30 seconds on my machine, but times out the 60 second limit on Tio.run.

  • 678987 takes ~1.5 minutes.

  • 969696 takes ~4.5 minutes.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Clever way of doing the factors. \$\endgroup\$ – AdmBorkBork Aug 29 '17 at 12:33
2
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MATL, 16 bytes

ZqP"@V'666'Xf?@.

Try it at MATL Online

Explanation

         Implicitly grab input (n)
Zq       Compute the primes up to n (output is in increasing order)
P        Flip the array (so larger primes come first)
"        For each prime
  @V     Convert it to a string
  '666'  Push the string literal '666' to the stack
  Xf     Find the location of '666' in the prime
  ?      If it was present...
    @.   Push it to the stack and break
         Implicitly display the stack contents
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2
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C++ 389 bytes

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/multiprecision/cpp_int.hpp>
#include <boost/multiprecision/miller_rabin.hpp>
using namespace boost::random;typedef boost::multiprecision::cpp_int Z;int main(int,char**v){mt19937 m(clock());independent_bits_engine<mt11213b,256,Z>g(m);Z n{v[1]},p;while(p++<=n)if(miller_rabin_test(p,25,g)&&p.convert_to<std::string>().find( "666" )!=-1)std::cout<<p<<" ";}

This is a full program!
You'll need Boost to compile it. (Or copy and paste into your favorite online C++ shell.)
Run it from the command-line giving n as argument.

Ungolfed:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/multiprecision/cpp_int.hpp>
#include <boost/multiprecision/miller_rabin.hpp>
using namespace boost::random;

typedef boost::multiprecision::cpp_int integer;

int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
  mt19937 mt( clock() );
  independent_bits_engine <mt11213b, 256, integer> rng( mt );

  integer input {argv[ 1 ]};
  integer possible;

  while (possible++ <= input)
    if (
      // is_prime( possible )
      miller_rabin_test( possible, 25, rng )
    && 
      // possible has "666" in it
      (possible.convert_to <std::string> ().find( "666" ) != std::string::npos))

    std::cout << possible << " ";
}

Shortcuts were made in terms of random number testing. The original code started testing possible primes at 6661 and incremented by two. You'll also get a compiler warning because of that (-1) there instead of npos.

Still, this runs pretty quickly. It only took about 40 seconds to find all 214 satan primes under 1,000,000 on my old AMD Sempron 130.

:^D

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2
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Bash + bsd-games package, 33

  • 2 bytes saved thanks to @FedericoPoloni.
primes 2 $[$1+1]|grep 666|tail -1

Try it online.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You can save 1 byte if you replace the last two commands with tail -n1. \$\endgroup\$ – Federico Poloni Aug 26 '17 at 8:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ @FedericoPoloni duh - can't believe I forgot tail here. In fact tail -1 is even 1 less. \$\endgroup\$ – Digital Trauma Aug 30 '17 at 16:56
1
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Python 3, 85 83 80 bytes

Halvard's is 4 bytes shorter because it's done in Python 2.

lambda k:max(x for x in range(k+1)if"666"in str(x)*all(x%i for i in range(2,x)))

Try it online!

Give it some time, it's extremely slow because of its O(n^2) complexity.

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1
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JavaScript (ES6), 55 54 bytes

-1 byte thanks to @ThePirateBay.

f=n=>/666/.test(d=n)&eval("while(n%--d);d<2")?n:f(n-1)

Very slow with large inputs. Primality test adapted from this code golf answer.

Timings

  • Input 10000 took 10 seconds
  • Input 328765 took 3 minutes
  • Input 678987 took 9 minutes
  • Input 969696 took 16 minutes

Tests

Some of these will hang your browser for several minutes.

f=n=>/666/.test(d=n)&eval("while(n%--d);d<2")?n:f(n-1)

function test(n) {
  O.value="Working..."
  setTimeout(_=>{
    let t = Date.now()
    O.value=`f(${n}) = ${f(n)} in ${(Date.now()-t)/1000}s`
  }, 10)
}
Tests<br>
<button onclick="test(6662)">6662</button>
<button onclick="test(10000)">10000</button>
<button onclick="test(328765)">328765</button>
<button onclick="test(678987)">678987</button>
<button onclick="test(969696)">6662</button><br>
Result<br>
<input id=O type=text size=25 readonly>

Faster Version, 56 bytes

Completes each test case in under a second.

f=n=>/666/.test(n)&&eval("for(d=2;n%d++;);d>n")?n:f(n-1)

;[6662, 10000, 328765, 678987, 969696].forEach(n=>console.log(`f(${n}) -> ${f(n)}`))

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  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ You should never do that. This is code golf and the performance is totally irrelevant. I strongly suggest rolling back to your previous 55 byte answer. Also, you can reduce it to 54 bytes by replacing d==1 with d<2 since n>6661. \$\endgroup\$ – user72349 Aug 26 '17 at 5:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ 52 bytes: f=n=>/666/.test(n)&(g=d=>n%--d?g(d):d<2)(n)?n:f(n-1) but will throw a recursion error for larger numbers. \$\endgroup\$ – Shaggy Aug 30 '17 at 16:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ f=n=>/666/.test(d=n)-eval("while(n%--d);d")?f(n-1):n \$\endgroup\$ – l4m2 May 2 '18 at 10:22
1
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Ruby, 67, 66, 58, 56 bytes

Includes +7 bytes for -rprime

->z{z.downto(1).find{|x|/666/=~x.to_s&&x.prime?}}

It's pretty fast, computing values up to ~2^52 in about a second and 2^64 in under 5 minutes (2011 MBP, Ruby 2.3.1).

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1
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Stax, 10 bytes

ü>:Ñb/VP6─

Run and debug it

Explanation (unpacked):

^w:pc$666$#! Full program, implicit input-parsing
^            Increment input
 w           do-while:
  :p           Previous prime
    c$         Copy and stringify
      666$     Push "666"
          #    Number of occurences
           !   Logical not
             Implicit output
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Nice program. Thanks for trying stax. FYI, it's also possible to do multiple cases by using the "Separator" option like this \$\endgroup\$ – recursive May 1 '18 at 14:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ @recursive ah, thx \$\endgroup\$ – wastl May 1 '18 at 14:48
0
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PHP, 148 bytes

<?php $p=[2];$s=[];for($i=3;$i<=$argv[1];$i++){foreach($p as $q)if($i%$q===0)continue 2;$p[]=$i;if(strpos($i,'666')!==false)$s[]=$i;}echo end($s);?>

Try it online!

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0
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Perl 6, 35 bytes

my&f={/666/&&.is-prime??$_!!f $_-1}

Try it online!

Straightforward recursive solution.

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0
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C# (.NET Core), 117 115 112 bytes

f=>{for(int i=f;i>1;i--){int p=1,j=2;while(j<i)if(i%j++<1)p=0;if(p>0&$"{i}".Contains("666"))return i;}return 0;}

Try it online!

  • 2 bytes saved by removing unnecessary braces.
  • 3 bytes saved by combining int declarations.

I'm sure this could be made shorter; maybe by recursively calling func f and removing the outer for-loop.

Recursive Approach, 85 bytes

i=>{int p=1,j=2;while(j<i)if(i%j++<1)p=0;return p>0&$"{i}".Contains("666")?i:f(--i);}

Try it online!

I'm unsure how well this approach fits within the bounds of code-golf due to having to set the Func<int,int> f = null first, and that f is called again, but not counted towards the bytes. Any clarification would be appreciated.

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