19
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Given a matrix consisting of positive integers, output the path with the lowest sum when traversing from the upper left element to the bottom right. You may move vertically, horizontally and diagonally. Note that it's possible to move both up/down, right/left and diagonally to all sides.

Example:

 1*   9    7    3   10    2    2
10    4*   1*   1*   1*   7    8
 3    6    3    8    9    5*   7
 8   10    2    5    2    1*   4
 5    1    1    3    6    7    9*

The path giving the lowest sum is marked with asterisks, and results in the following sum: 1+4+1+1+1+5+1+9=23.

Test cases:

1   1   1
1   1   1
Output: 3

 7    9    6    6    4
 6    5    9    1    6
10    7   10    4    3
 4    2    2    3    7
 9    2    7    9    4
Output: 28

2  42   6   4   1
3  33   1   1   1
4  21   7  59   1
1   7   6  49   1
1   9   2  39   1
Output: 27 (2+3+4+7+7+1+1+1+1)

 5    6    7    4    4
12   12   25   25   25
 9    4   25    9    5
 7    4   25    1   12
 4    4    4    4    4
Output: 34 (5+12+4+4+4+1+4)

1   1   1   1
9   9   9   1
1   9   9   9
1   9   9   9
1   1   1   1
Output: 15

 2   55    5    3    1    1    4    1
 2   56    1   99   99   99   99    5
 3   57    5    2    2    2   99    1
 3   58    4    2    8    1   99    2
 4   65   66   67   68    3   99    3
 2    5    4    3    3    4   99    5
75   76   77   78   79   80   81    2
 5    4    5    1    1    3    3    2
Output: 67 (2+2+3+3+4+5+4+3+3+3+1+2+2+1+3+1+1+4+5+1+2+3+5+2+2)

This is so the shortest code in each language wins.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Very similar, though it doesn't allow diagonal movement. \$\endgroup\$ – Mego Aug 18 '17 at 3:32
  • 7
    \$\begingroup\$ @WheatWizard I disagree. Apart from the mostly superficial differences that this challenge allows for diagonal movement and all positions are reachable, the other challenge requires return of the path itself rather than just the cost of the path. Unless you're using built-ins that return both, the code is not interchangeable. \$\endgroup\$ – beaker Aug 18 '17 at 16:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ @beaker I don't really see the difference. You have to find the path to know its length. The difference here is a rather small difference in output in my opinion and this challenge offers nothing new or interesting not already covered by that challenge. \$\endgroup\$ – Sriotchilism O'Zaic Aug 18 '17 at 18:24
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @WheatWizard My solution here does not find the path. It could find the path, but not without a separate predecessor array and logic to avoid making a node its own predecessor. Not to mention recovering the path at the end. \$\endgroup\$ – beaker Aug 18 '17 at 18:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @beaker The modification is rather trivial in my opinion. Regardless the question of dupes is not whether every single valid entry on one challenge can be ported over with minimal effort, its about the general case. Not only do I think most efforts here can be ported I don't think this challenge offers anything new or interesting from the other. \$\endgroup\$ – Sriotchilism O'Zaic Aug 18 '17 at 18:35
8
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JavaScript, 442 412 408 358 bytes

This is my first PPCG submission. Feedback would be appreciated.

(m,h=m.length,w=m[0].length)=>{for(i=0;i<h*w;i++)for(x=0;x<w;x++){for(y=0;y<h;y++){if(m[y][x]%1==0)m[y][x]={c:m[y][x],t:m[y][x]};for(X=-1;X<=1;X++)for(Y=-1;Y<=1;Y++){t=x+X;v=y+Y;if((X==0&&Y==0)||t<0||t>=w||v<0||v>=h)continue;if(m[v][t]%1==0)m[v][t]={c:m[v][t],t:null};c=m[y][x].t+m[v][t].c;if (c<m[v][t].t||m[v][t].t==null)m[v][t].t=c}}}return m[h-1][w-1].t}

This takes a multi-dimensional array as input.

Explanation

Basically, loop through all of the cells over and over adjusting the lowest known cost to get to each of the neighbors. Eventually, the grid will reach a state where the total cost to reach the bottom right is the lowest cost to get there.

Demo

f=(m,h=m.length,w=m[0].length)=>{for(i=0;i<h*w;i++)for(x=0;x<w;x++){for(y=0;y<h;y++){if(m[y][x]%1==0)m[y][x]={c:m[y][x],t:m[y][x]};for(X=-1;X<=1;X++)for(Y=-1;Y<=1;Y++){t=x+X;v=y+Y;if((X==0&&Y==0)||t<0||t>=w||v<0||v>=h)continue;if(m[v][t]%1==0)m[v][t]={c:m[v][t],t:null};c=m[y][x].t+m[v][t].c;if (c<m[v][t].t||m[v][t].t==null)m[v][t].t=c}}}return m[h-1][w-1].t}

//Tests
console.log(f([[1,1,1],[1,1,1]])===3);
console.log(f([[7,9,6,6,4],[6,5,9,1,6],[10,7,10,4,3],[4,2,2,3,7],[9,2,7,9,4]])===28);
console.log(f([[2,42,6,4,1],[3,33,1,1,1],[4,21,7,59,1],[1,7,6,49,1],[1,9,2,39,1]])===27);
console.log(f([[5,6,7,4,4],[12,12,25,25,25],[9,4,25,9,5],[7,4,25,1,12],[4,4,4,4,4]])===34); 
console.log(f([[1,1,1,1],[9,9,9,1],[1,9,9,9],[1,9,9,9],[1,1,1,1]])===15)
console.log(f([[2,55,5,3,1,1,4,1],[2,56,1,99,99,99,99,5],[3,57,5,2,2,2,99,1],[3,58,4,2,8,1,99,2],[4,65,66,67,68,3,99,3],[2,5,4,3,3,4,99,5],[75,76,77,78,79,80,81,2],[5,4,5,1,1,3,3,2]])===67);

Edit: Special thanks to @ETHproductions for helping me shave dozens of tasty bytes.

More thanks to @Stewie Griffin for your tips that knocked off 50 bytes.

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  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to PPCG! There are some extra spaces you could remove toward the end (I count 5 total), and you don't need any of the semicolons directly before a } which should save a few bytes. You also don't need to declare your variables; I think removing the vars should save you 24 more bytes total. \$\endgroup\$ – ETHproductions Aug 18 '17 at 2:34
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to PPCG =) I'm glad you chose one of my challenges as a starting point. My only comment: I love explanations. It's optional though, so you don't have to add it unless you want to. :) \$\endgroup\$ – Stewie Griffin Aug 18 '17 at 18:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think maybe storing m[v][t] as a variable: t=x+X;v=y+Y;k=m[v][t] will be even shorter...? \$\endgroup\$ – Stewie Griffin Jun 23 '18 at 21:18
7
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Python 3 + numpy + scipy, 239 222 186 bytes

from numpy import*
from scipy.sparse.csgraph import*
def f(M):m,n=s=M.shape;x,y=indices(s);return dijkstra([(M*(abs(i//n-x)<2)*(abs(i%n-y)<2)).flatten()for i in range(m*n)])[0,-1]+M[0,0]

Try it online!

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6
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Octave + Image Processing package, 175 162 157 151 142 139 bytes

Saved 14 bytes thanks to @Luis Mendo and 1 byte thanks to @notjagan

function P(G)A=inf(z=size(G));A(1)=G(1);for k=G(:)'B=im2col(padarray(A,[1,1],inf),[3,3])+G(:)';B(5,:)-=G(:)';A=reshape(min(B),z);end,A(end)

Uses the Image Processing package, because why not? Isn't that how everybody solves graph problems?

Try it online!

Exploded

function P(G)
   A=inf(z=size(G));         % Initialize distance array to all Inf
   A(1)=G(1);                % Make A(1) = cost of start cell
   for k=G(:)'               % For a really long time...
      B=im2col(padarray(A,[1,1],inf),[3,3])+G(:)';
       %  B=padarray(A,[1,1],inf);     % Add border of Inf around distance array
       %  B=im2col(B,[3,3]);           % Turn each 3x3 neighborhood into a column
       %  B=B+G(:)';                   % Add the weights to each row
      B(5,:)-=G(:)';         % Subtract the weights from center of neighborhood
      A=reshape(min(B),z);   % Take minimum columnwise and reshape to original
   end
   A(end)                    % Display cost of getting to last cell

Explanation

Given an array of weights:

7   12    6    2    4
5   13    3   11    1
4    7    2    9    3
4    2   12   13    4
9    2    7    9    4

Initialize a cost array so that the cost to reach every element is Infinity, except the starting point (the upper left element) whose cost is equal to its weight.

  7   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf

This is iteration 0. For each subsequent iteration, the cost to reach a cell is set to the minimum of:

  • the current cost to reach that element, and
  • the current cost to reach the element's neighbors + the weight of the element

After the first iteration, the cost of the path to element (2,2) (using 1-based indexing) will be

minimum([  7   Inf   Inf]   [13  13  13]) = 20
        [Inf   Inf   Inf] + [13   0  13]
        [Inf   Inf   Inf]   [13  13  13]

The full cost array after the first iteration would be:

  7    19   Inf   Inf   Inf
 12    20   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf

After iteration k, each element will be the lowest cost of reaching that element from the start taking at most k steps. For example, the element at (3,3) can be reached in 2 steps (iterations) for a cost of 22:

  7    19    25   Inf   Inf
 12    20    22   Inf   Inf
 16    19    22   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf
Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf   Inf

But on the 4th iteration, a path of 4 steps is found with a cost of 20:

 7   19   25   24   28
12   20   22   32   25
16   19   20   30   34
20   18   30   34   35
27   20   25   40   39

Since no path through the mxn matrix can be longer than the number of elements in the matrix (as a very loose upper bound), after m*n iterations every element will contain the cost of the shortest path to reach that element from the start.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ -1 byte by removing the space between while and ~. \$\endgroup\$ – notjagan Aug 18 '17 at 2:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ @notjagan I switched from while to for and was still able to use your tip. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – beaker Aug 18 '17 at 2:44
5
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JavaScript, 197 bytes

a=>(v=a.map(x=>x.map(_=>1/0)),v[0][0]=a[0][0],q=[...(a+'')].map(_=>v=v.map((l,y)=>l.map((c,x)=>Math.min(c,...[...'012345678'].map(c=>a[y][x]+((v[y+(c/3|0)-1]||[])[x+c%3-1]||1/0)))))),v.pop().pop())

Prettify:

a=>(
  // v is a matrix holds minimal distance to the left top
  v=a.map(x=>x.map(_=>1/0)),
  v[0][0]=a[0][0],
  q=[
     // iterate more than width * height times to ensure the answer is correct
    ...(a+'')
  ].map(_=>
    v=v.map((l,y)=>
      l.map((c,x)=>
        // update each cell
        Math.min(c,...[...'012345678'].map(
          c=>a[y][x]+((v[y+(c/3|0)-1]||[])[x+c%3-1]||1/0)
        ))
      )
    )
  ),
  // get result at right bottom
  v.pop().pop()
)
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4
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Mathematica 279 Bytes

Basic idea is to create a graph with vertices corresponding to matrix entries and directed edges between any two vertices separated by a ChessboardDistance greater than zero but less than or equal to 1. Incidentally, this happens to be known as a King graph, since it corresponds to the valid moves of a king on a chessboard.

FindShortestPath is then used to get the minimal path. It works on EdgeWeight, not VertexWeight, so there is some extra code to define the EdgeWeight as the matrix entry corresponding to the destination of each directed edge.

Code:

(m=Flatten[#];d=Dimensions@#;s=Range[Times@@d];e=Select[Tuples[s,2],0<ChessboardDistance@@(#/.Thread[s->({Ceiling[#/d[[1]]],Mod[#,d[[1]],1]}&/@s)])≤1&];Tr[FindShortestPath[Graph[s,#[[1]]->#[[2]]&/@e,EdgeWeight->(Last@#&/@Map[Extract[m,#]&,e,{2}])],1,Last@s]/.Thread[s->m]])&

Note that the character is the transpose symbol. It will paste into Mathematica as-is.

Usage:

%@{{2, 55, 5, 3, 1, 1, 4, 1},
  {2, 56, 1, 99, 99, 99, 99, 5},
  {3, 57, 5, 2, 2, 2, 99, 1},
  {3, 58, 4, 2, 8, 1, 99, 2},
  {4, 65, 66, 67, 68, 3, 99, 3},
  {2, 5, 4, 3, 3, 4, 99, 5},
  {75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 2},
  {5, 4, 5, 1, 1, 3, 3, 2}}

Output:

67

If you set g=Graph[...,GraphLayout->{"GridEmbedding","Dimension"->d},VertexLabels->Thread[s->m] and p=FindShortestPath[... then the following graphic will visually display the solution (top of the matrix corresponds to the bottom of the graph):

HighlightGraph[g,PathGraph[p,Thread[Most@p->Rest@p]]]

enter image description here

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3
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Haskell, 228 bytes

Positions are lists of two elements, because those are easy to generate with sequence and just as easy to pattern match as 2-tuples.

h=g[[-1,-1]]
g t@(p:r)c|p==m=0|1<2=minimum$(sum$concat c):(\q@[a,b]->c!!a!!b+g(q:t)c)#(f(e$s$(\x->[0..x])#m)$f(not.e t)$zipWith(+)p#s[[-1..1],[-1..1]])where m=[l(c)-1,l(head c)-1]
(#)=map
f=filter
e=flip elem
s=sequence
l=length

Start at -1,-1 and count the cost of each steps destination field.

Alternative first two lines: start at 0,0, count the departure fields, terminate at the coordinates equal to the matrix dimensions (so down-right from the goal, which needs to be added to the list of legal destinations) - exact same length but slower:

j=i[[0,0]]
i t@(p@[a,b]:r)c|p==m=0|1<2=c!!a!!b+(minimum$(sum$concat c):(\q->i(q:t)c)#(f(e$m:(s$(\x->[0..x-1])#m))$f(not.e t)$zipWith(+)p#s[[-1..1],[-1..1]]))where m=[l c,l$head c]

Using an infix for map does not save bytes here but I substitute it as soon as it doesn't cost one, because it can only get better with more uses, and sometimes with other restructurings as well which shave off another pair of parentheses.

To be improved: Redundant filters. Merging/in-lining them to filter(flip elem$(s$(\x->[0..x])#m)\\p) with import Data.List for \\ costs 3 bytes.

Also, too bad (fromEnumTo 0) is 2 bytes longer than (\x->[0..x]).

sum$concat c is all fields' cost summed up and thus a concisely expressible upper bound on the path cost which is given to the minimum to avoid an empty list (my type checker has already determined the whole thing to work on Integers, so no hard-coding the maximum, hehe). No matter how I restrict steps based on the previous one made (which would speed up the algorithm a lot, but also cost bytes), I can not avoid the dead ends that make this fall-back necessary.

  • One filter idea was ((not.e n).zipWith(-)(head r)) with extracting n=s[[-1..1],[-1..1]], which necessitates adding ,[-1,-1] to the initial path. The algorithm then avoids going where it could already have gone in the previous step, which makes stepping on an edge field orthogonally to that edge a dead end.

  • Another was ((>=0).sum.z(*)d) with extracting z=zipWith, which introduces a new argument d to the recursive function that is given as (z(-)p q) in the recursion and [1,1] in the initial case. The algorithm avoids successive steps with a negative scalar product (d being the previous step), which means no sharp 45°-turns. This still narrows down the choices considerably, and avoids the previous trivial dead end, but there are still paths that end up enclosed in already-visited fields (and possibly an 'escape' which however would be a sharp turn).

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3
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Python 2, 356 320 bytes

s=input()
r=lambda x:[x-1,x,x+1][-x-2:]
w=lambda z:[z+[(x,y)]for x in r(z[-1][0])for y in r(z[-1][1])if x<len(s)>0==((x,y)in z)<len(s[0])>y]
l=len(s)-1,len(s[0])-1
f=lambda x:all(l in y for y in x)and x or f([a for b in[l in z and[z]or w(z)for z in x]for a in b])
print min(sum(s[a][b]for(a,b)in x)for x in f([[(0,0)]]))

Try it here!

-36 bytes thanks to notjagan!

Receives a list of lists as an input, and outputs the lowest cost when navigating the matrix from the upper left to the bottom right.

Explanation

Find every possible route from the upper left to the bottom right of the matrix, creating a list of x,y coordinates for each route. The routes cannot backtrack, and they must end at (len(s)-1,len(s[0])-1).

Sum the integers on each path of coordinates, and return the minimum cost.

The print can be easily changed to output the list of coordinates for the shortest route.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ -36 bytes with some miscellaneous changes. \$\endgroup\$ – notjagan Aug 20 '17 at 2:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ @notjagan Great changes, especially the use of or for the conditionals. Thank you! \$\endgroup\$ – Solvation Aug 20 '17 at 17:52
1
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APL (Dyalog Classic), 33 bytes

{⊃⌽,(⊢⌊⍵+(⍉3⌊/⊣/,⊢,⊢/)⍣2)⍣≡+\+⍀⍵}

Try it online!

{ } function with argument

+\+⍀⍵ take partial sums by row and by column to establish a pessimistic upper bound on path distances

( )⍣≡ repeat until convergence:

  • (⍉3⌊/⊣/,⊢,⊢/)⍣2 min of distances to neighbours, i.e. do twice (( )⍣2): prepend leftmost column (⊣/,) to self () and append rightmost columns (,⊢/), find minima in horizontal triples (3⌊/) and transpose ()

  • ⍵+ add each node's value to its min of distances to neighbours

  • ⊢⌊ try to beat the current best distances

⊃⌽, finally, return the bottom right cell

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