7
\$\begingroup\$

(related)

Your challenge is to output the highest number you can. You can output as a number or as a string. You must output something that matches the regex ^\d+$, as in only 0-9.

The Twist

Your source code must be:

  1. Same forwards and backwards

  2. 3 bytes long

  3. The middle byte must be different from the other two

Example valid:

0_0
)-)
m.m
xvx
W$W
@\@

Example invalid:

mnop
l__l
___
T_+
O_o
0_o

Snippets are allowed, you don't need a full program / function.

Highest number outputted wins!

\$\endgroup\$
17
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ This is easy to brute force for any language. \$\endgroup\$
    – xnor
    Jun 8, 2017 at 21:44
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @cairdcoinheringaahing highest number wins \$\endgroup\$
    – user58826
    Jun 8, 2017 at 21:45
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @programmer5000 Perhaps because its trivial, boring, and leaves little room for interesting solutions? I haven't voted on it, but this might be why it stands currently at +1/-4 \$\endgroup\$ Jun 8, 2017 at 21:49
  • 7
    \$\begingroup\$ I downvoted because there are so few possible answers that it's impossible to be at all imaginative, and for most languages the optimal answer is the same (989, 9^9, 9e9, ...). \$\endgroup\$
    – Doorknob
    Jun 8, 2017 at 22:02
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ All of which are, notably, esolangs. (And if you're counting by number of languages, the majority of them do.) \$\endgroup\$
    – Doorknob
    Jun 8, 2017 at 22:07

16 Answers 16

16
\$\begingroup\$

Jelly, 103000

ȷ*ȷ

Try it online!

How it works

ȷ denotes an scientific-notational number, as in 2ȷ6 for 2000000. Without digits on either side, it defaults to a value of 1000. * is exponentiation, giving 10001000.

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15
\$\begingroup\$

Polyglot (28+ Langs), \$9\times10^9\$

Works With:

APL, AWK, Arcyou, C#, CJam, Convex, Excel, Google Sheets, J, Japt, Java, JavaScript, MATL, MATLAB, MY-BASIC, Perl 5, Perl 6, PHP, PowerShell, Python, R, RProgN, TI-BASIC, Uiua, VB, VB.NET, VBA, VBScript

This is a polyglot, if it works in your language add it to the list

9e9

or

9E9

or (Pretty much only for TI-BASIC)

9ᴇ9

Try it Online. (VB.Net)

(dependant on language)

  • Added Uiua thanks to @RomanPro100
  • Added APL and J thanks to @Adám
  • Added Python thanks to @VoteToReopen
  • Added Japt thanks to @Shaggy
  • Added Perl 5/6 thanks to @bradgilbertb2gills
  • Added PowerShell thanks to @tessellatingheckler
  • Added C# thanks to @TheLethalCoder
  • Added Visual Basic Family
  • Added R thanks to @JarkoDubbeldam
  • Added AWK, Arcyou, CJam, Convex, MATL, MATLAB, PHP, RProgN, TI-Basic, MY-BASIC
  • Added Java thanks to @KevinCruijssen
  • Added Excel and Google Sheets

Note: With formatting, supported by: Clojure, Common Lisp, Crystal, D, Go, Haskell, Java, Julia, Kotlin, Lua, Maxima, NIM, Racket, Rexx, Ruby, Rust, Scala

\$\endgroup\$
17
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Works in APL and J. \$\endgroup\$
    – Adám
    Jun 8, 2017 at 21:56
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Brute force for J. 9E9 (or 9e9) is the largest possible value. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 8, 2017 at 22:18
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Works in Japt. \$\endgroup\$
    – Shaggy
    Jun 8, 2017 at 22:30
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Works in Perl 5 and Perl 6. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 8, 2017 at 22:43
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ I believe this should be turned into a community wiki \$\endgroup\$
    – user41805
    Jun 9, 2017 at 9:39
10
\$\begingroup\$

Brainfuck, 255

-+-

Assuming 8-bit bounded cells.


Per this meta consensus, the contents of the tape post-execution may be used as a Turing machine's output.

\$\endgroup\$
9
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ You could also go for -.- which outputs the ASCII character code 255, and is also a relatively common emoticon. \$\endgroup\$
    – Zack C.
    Jun 9, 2017 at 18:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ZackC. I thought about it, but . will print ÿ where the question demands matching \d+. outputting through tape contents seemed to oversee this because it uses numbers (until printed). \$\endgroup\$
    – Uriel
    Jun 10, 2017 at 18:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ By assuming larger cells (I think 32-bit cell interpreters exist, possibly even 64-bit cells), you can get bigger values! \$\endgroup\$ Jun 11, 2017 at 17:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @CalculatorFeline yea, but then I can claim for 1024, 2048, 4096... and there's no end (storage boundaries are not assumable). so I took on the common specs (and implementations) that lists 8 as a default when one exists. \$\endgroup\$
    – Uriel
    Jun 11, 2017 at 17:02
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ "Languages are defined by their interpreters", so if you can find a 9999999999999999-bit interpreter, you can get 2^9999999999999999-1. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 11, 2017 at 17:03
9
\$\begingroup\$

Japt, 1.001001001001001e+299 = 100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100100

Found a bigger one thanks to ETHproductions informing me that strings were permitted.

LçL

Try it


Explanation

  • L is the Japt constant for the number 100.
  • The ç method, which takes string s as an argument, when applied to a number n, repeats s n times. If a number is passed as the argument, it's cast to a string.
  • So, reading LçL backwards, it's "100 repeated 100 times".

Original, 10200

LpL

Try it

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Explanation please. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 11, 2017 at 16:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Explanation added, @CalculatorFeline. \$\endgroup\$
    – Shaggy
    Jun 12, 2017 at 14:21
5
\$\begingroup\$

05AB1E, 100! (93326215443944152681699238856266700490715968264381621468592963895217599993229915608941463976156518286253697920827223758251185210916864000000000000000000000000)

!т!

Try it online!

т is the constant 100 and the first ! is just ignored.

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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ah! ! > ° I see. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 13, 2017 at 14:41
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Scientific notation for easy comparison \$9.33262\times10^{157}\$ \$\endgroup\$ Apr 2 at 0:18
3
\$\begingroup\$

Mathematica, 387420489

this one

9^9  

Mathematica, 3265920

9!9
\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ 9^9 is a larger number. \$\endgroup\$
    – Doorknob
    Jun 8, 2017 at 21:42
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ yes I realised it right after I posted it :-) \$\endgroup\$
    – ZaMoC
    Jun 8, 2017 at 21:44
2
\$\begingroup\$

Vim, 999999999

9i9

Since snippets are allowed, this works in vim as well as V, so you'll have to hit escape after this.

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

05AB1E, 10e100

°т°

Try it online!

also it looks more like a uterus than a face...

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 7
    \$\begingroup\$ Looks like a bear face to be \$\endgroup\$
    – ASCII-only
    Jun 19, 2017 at 2:35
2
\$\begingroup\$

QBIC, 10

?z?

The challenge specifically asks to "output" the number, and the only way to do that in QBIC is using ?. So this prints z (which is 10 in QBIC) followed by 2 newlines.

A slightly more relaxed take on the rules would give us this snippet:

z^z

which is good for 10,000,000,000. It doesn't output anything (in fact, it doesn't even assign the result), but as a 3-byte ABA snippet it reaches the highest number possible.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Brachylog, 39916800

ḟjḟ

Try it online!

Explanation

ḟ      Factorial: the Input is a free variable, so it considers that its input is 0
 j     Juxtapose: 11
  ḟ    Factorial: 39916800
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2
\$\begingroup\$

Japt, 2550

#ÿ#

3 bytes in extended ASCII, where ÿ has code 255. # gets it's code and returns it, while the second # returns simply 0, because nothing follows it.

Try it online!

Japt, 91

Really bad score. That's just an experiment

;I;

Try it online!

;I;
;   Alternative variables mode
 I  Constant for 91
  ; Command separator - does nothing

Japt, ~1e+102 (cheating?)

Probably not valid answer, because Japt is transpiled to JS which automatically converts numbers to scientific notation.

LeL

It's basically 100^100.

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I don't see why XeX would be cheating; 9e9 is the best possible answer in a number of languages, including JS. And even if scientific notation was cheating, this technically isn't using it, because e is actually a method here, multiplying the first number by 10 to the second ;-) \$\endgroup\$ Jan 13, 2018 at 0:48
1
\$\begingroup\$

Braingolf, 126

#~#

Try it online!

Yep, that's as high as Braingolf can go under these restrictions.

Explanation:

#~   Pushes codepoint of ~ (126)
  #  Does nothing
     Implicit output of last item on stack
\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Psi, 99980001

Spell

Not super inventive. And it's probably cheating.

I'd love to use Operator: Power instead, but the "base" and "power" arrows are different colors, making it not symmetrical.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Yabasic, \$2^{1024}−2^{971}\$

Yabasic appears to have handle division by zero by returning the maximum double float value of \$2^{1024}−2^{971} \approx 1.797693134862316\times10^{308}\$. This means the snippet

0/0

returns a value of

1797693134862315708145274237317043567980705675258449965989174768031572
6078002853876058955863276687817154045895351438246423432132688946418276
8467546703537516986049910576551282076245490090389328944075868508455133
9423045832369032229481658085593321233482747978262041447231687381771809
19299881250404026184124858368.

Try it online!

Note: the Print command converts any number with a length greater than 10 digits to scientific notation, so a Using command is used to print the value without converting it to scientific notation

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is this some kind of integer overflow? \$\endgroup\$
    – user58826
    Jul 3, 2018 at 18:22
1
\$\begingroup\$

Pip, \$\approx 1.001001\times10^{3999}\$

mXm

Attempt This Online!

m is a variable preinitialized to 1000, and X is string repetition.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Aceto, 387420489

Since snippets are allowed,

9F9

may push 9^9 on the stack, depending on where in the code it is. An example of it working would be:

 9F9
   p

(the p merely prints, you could replace it with a nop and it would still work)

\$\endgroup\$

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