105
\$\begingroup\$

In this challenge, you should write a program or function which takes no input and prints or returns a string with the same number of bytes as the program itself. There are a few rules:

  • You may only output bytes in the printable ASCII range (0x20 to 0x7E, inclusive), or newlines (0x0A or 0x0D).
  • Your code must not be a quine, so the code and the output must differ in at least one byte.
  • Your code must be at least one byte long.
  • If your output contains trailing newlines, those are part of the byte count.
  • If your code requires non-standard command-line flags, count them as usual (i.e. by adding the difference to a standard invocation of your language's implementation to the byte count), and the output's length must match your solution's score. E.g. if your program is ab and requires the non-standard flag -n (we'll assume it can't be combined with standard flags, so it's 3 bytes), you should output 5 bytes in total.
  • The output doesn't always have to be the same, as long as you can show that every possible output satisfies the above requirements.
  • Usual quine rules don't apply. You may read the source code or its size, but I doubt this will be shorter than hardcoding it in most languages.

You may write a program or a function and use any of the standard methods of providing output. Note that if you print the result, you may choose to print it either to the standard output or the standard error stream, but only one of them counts.

You may use any programming language, but note that these loopholes are forbidden by default.

This is , so the shortest valid answer – measured in bytes – wins.

Leaderboard

var QUESTION_ID=121056,OVERRIDE_USER=8478;function answersUrl(e){return"https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/questions/"+QUESTION_ID+"/answers?page="+e+"&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter="+ANSWER_FILTER}function commentUrl(e,s){return"https://api.stackexchange.com/2.2/answers/"+s.join(";")+"/comments?page="+e+"&pagesize=100&order=desc&sort=creation&site=codegolf&filter="+COMMENT_FILTER}function getAnswers(){jQuery.ajax({url:answersUrl(answer_page++),method:"get",dataType:"jsonp",crossDomain:!0,success:function(e){answers.push.apply(answers,e.items),answers_hash=[],answer_ids=[],e.items.forEach(function(e){e.comments=[];var s=+e.share_link.match(/\d+/);answer_ids.push(s),answers_hash[s]=e}),e.has_more||(more_answers=!1),comment_page=1,getComments()}})}function getComments(){jQuery.ajax({url:commentUrl(comment_page++,answer_ids),method:"get",dataType:"jsonp",crossDomain:!0,success:function(e){e.items.forEach(function(e){e.owner.user_id===OVERRIDE_USER&&answers_hash[e.post_id].comments.push(e)}),e.has_more?getComments():more_answers?getAnswers():process()}})}function getAuthorName(e){return e.owner.display_name}function process(){var e=[];answers.forEach(function(s){var r=s.body;s.comments.forEach(function(e){OVERRIDE_REG.test(e.body)&&(r="<h1>"+e.body.replace(OVERRIDE_REG,"")+"</h1>")});var a=r.match(SCORE_REG);a&&e.push({user:getAuthorName(s),size:+a[2],language:a[1],link:s.share_link})}),e.sort(function(e,s){var r=e.size,a=s.size;return r-a});var s={},r=1,a=null,n=1;e.forEach(function(e){e.size!=a&&(n=r),a=e.size,++r;var t=jQuery("#answer-template").html();t=t.replace("{{PLACE}}",n+".").replace("{{NAME}}",e.user).replace("{{LANGUAGE}}",e.language).replace("{{SIZE}}",e.size).replace("{{LINK}}",e.link),t=jQuery(t),jQuery("#answers").append(t);var o=e.language;/<a/.test(o)&&(o=jQuery(o).text()),s[o]=s[o]||{lang:e.language,user:e.user,size:e.size,link:e.link}});var t=[];for(var o in s)s.hasOwnProperty(o)&&t.push(s[o]);t.sort(function(e,s){var F=function(a){return a.lang.replace(/<\/?a.*?>/g,"").toLowerCase()},el=F(e),sl=F(s);return el>sl?1:el<sl?-1:0});for(var c=0;c<t.length;++c){var i=jQuery("#language-template").html(),o=t[c];i=i.replace("{{LANGUAGE}}",o.lang).replace("{{NAME}}",o.user).replace("{{SIZE}}",o.size).replace("{{LINK}}",o.link),i=jQuery(i),jQuery("#languages").append(i)}}var ANSWER_FILTER="!t)IWYnsLAZle2tQ3KqrVveCRJfxcRLe",COMMENT_FILTER="!)Q2B_A2kjfAiU78X(md6BoYk",answers=[],answers_hash,answer_ids,answer_page=1,more_answers=!0,comment_page;getAnswers();var SCORE_REG=/<h\d>\s*([^\n,]*[^\s,]),.*?(\d+)(?=[^\n\d<>]*(?:<(?:s>[^\n<>]*<\/s>|[^\n<>]+>)[^\n\d<>]*)*<\/h\d>)/,OVERRIDE_REG=/^Override\s*header:\s*/i;
body{text-align:left!important}#answer-list,#language-list{padding:10px;width:290px;float:left}table thead{font-weight:700}table td{padding:5px}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="//cdn.sstatic.net/codegolf/all.css?v=83c949450c8b"> <div id="answer-list"> <h2>Leaderboard</h2> <table class="answer-list"> <thead> <tr><td></td><td>Author</td><td>Language</td><td>Size</td></tr></thead> <tbody id="answers"> </tbody> </table> </div><div id="language-list"> <h2>Winners by Language</h2> <table class="language-list"> <thead> <tr><td>Language</td><td>User</td><td>Score</td></tr></thead> <tbody id="languages"> </tbody> </table> </div><table style="display: none"> <tbody id="answer-template"> <tr><td>{{PLACE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr></tbody> </table> <table style="display: none"> <tbody id="language-template"> <tr><td>{{LANGUAGE}}</td><td>{{NAME}}</td><td>{{SIZE}}</td><td><a href="{{LINK}}">Link</a></td></tr></tbody> </table>

\$\endgroup\$
19
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Related. Related. \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 11:19
  • 21
    \$\begingroup\$ "Your code must not be a quine" but... but... it's tagged quine \$\endgroup\$
    – Okx
    May 17 '17 at 11:21
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ @Okx Because it's a generalised quine, i.e. the required output depends on the source code. \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 11:22
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ @MartinEnder You should probably disallow output by exit code, which is a default. If you allow it nearly every one byte program in nearly every language is allowed. One user has already done this \$\endgroup\$
    – Grain Ghost
    May 17 '17 at 22:37
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @WheatWizard output by exit code is not a string, so it doesn't apply here. \$\endgroup\$ May 18 '17 at 4:29

265 Answers 265

1
2
3 4 5
9
7
\$\begingroup\$

C#, 22 16 bytes

()=>$"{1L<<50}";

-6 bytes thanks to Orjan Johansen, using long instead of int.

Outputs

1125899906842624

Alternately, if you allow an arbitrary parameter to be passed into the lambda:

C#, 21 15 bytes

_=>$"{1L<<49}";

Outputs

562949953421312
\$\endgroup\$
4
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you use long you can do it shorter with only one group: ()=>$"{1L<<50}";. Try it online! \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 23:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Good job on posting such a short C# answer. You can also shave of a byte by using +"" instead of string interpolation. \$\endgroup\$
    – LiefdeWen
    May 18 '17 at 8:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Neither 1L<<50+"" or ""+1L<<50 works for me due to << having lower precedence than +, so would need to add parens making the length the same. \$\endgroup\$
    – milk
    May 18 '17 at 19:37
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Why do you include a semicolon? It's not part of the function. \$\endgroup\$ May 21 '17 at 15:08
7
\$\begingroup\$

Cubix, 6 4 bytes

@"Ou

Try it online

Cubified

  @
" O u .
  .

This pushes the string Ou. to the stack, Outputs the top character (.) as a character code (46), does a u-turn to the right, Outputs again, and exits with @.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ very nice answer, @(Ou works as well \$\endgroup\$
    – MickyT
    May 18 '17 at 19:01
7
\$\begingroup\$

Excel, 7 bytes

=9^7&""

Produces a 7 digit number and then appends empty string

Uses general idea from pajonk in their answer [although obviously not the language trick :)]

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to PPCG! I edited your header so that it gets picked up by the leaderboard. :) \$\endgroup\$ May 19 '17 at 13:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ "Why not just make a 4 digit number?" The challenge states that the function must return a string. It can be checked by T function whether something is string in Excel - the first solution isn't, the second is. Anyway, upvote as promised. \$\endgroup\$
    – pajonk
    May 20 '17 at 16:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @pajonk Great point. I have taken the smaller solution out as I agree it does not meet the conditions. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$
    – OpiesDad
    May 20 '17 at 21:19
7
\$\begingroup\$

bash, 48 bytes

bash bash bash bash bash bash! bash! bash! bash!

Output:

/bin/bash: /bin/bash: cannot execute binary file
\$\endgroup\$
7
\$\begingroup\$

NodeJS REPL, 4 bytes

Did someone say REPLs are languages?

*;;;

..._

(the underscore is actually a space character).

For anyone not familiar with the Node REPL, it thinks my program isn't complete, so it's prompting for the rest of the line.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ You could also use !!!0, 1e2 or "" \$\endgroup\$
    – powelles
    May 22 '17 at 19:48
7
\$\begingroup\$

Well, uh...

Mornington Crescent, 1731 bytes

Take Northern Line to Stockwell
Take Victoria Line to Seven Sisters
Take Victoria Line to Green Park
Take Piccadilly Line to Green Park
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to Russell Square
Take Piccadilly Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Metropolitan Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Hammersmith & City Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Circle Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Circle Line to King's Cross St. Pancras
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take Circle Line to Bank
Take Northern Line to Mornington Crescent

Prints out the value of 7^2048, which is 1731 digits long. Try it online! Verify that it's actually 1731 digits long!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ I like this answer a lot. \$\endgroup\$
    – Razetime
    Sep 18 '20 at 14:45
6
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript (ES6), 9 bytes

_=>""+1E8

Returns 1 * 10^8, or 100000000.

If I can return a number instead of a string, _=>1E5 is 6 bytes.

f=
_=>""+1E8

console.log(f())

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Beat me by a couple of minutes. \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 11:32
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Some of the Python answers seem to be outputting numbers, so you should be fine doing the same. \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 11:53
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @numbermaniac But they print them, which converts them to string. \$\endgroup\$
    – Neil
    May 17 '17 at 11:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ @numbermaniac OP (Martin Ender) told me it was wrong. \$\endgroup\$
    – Stephen
    May 17 '17 at 12:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ a=b=>b+"" 9 bytes Include the function name :) \$\endgroup\$ Oct 1 '19 at 6:54
6
\$\begingroup\$

QBasic 4.5, 1 byte

?

This prints nothing. Followed by a newline.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Thou winneth one internet. \$\endgroup\$
    – Joshua
    May 20 '17 at 19:24
6
\$\begingroup\$

><>, 4 bytes

"on;

Try it online!

Outputs ;110

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

Ruby, 5 4 3 bytes

Crossed out 4 is still 4 ;(

p$*

Prints [] (empty array) then a newline

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nice. I was about to propose p p, but didn't think about the newline. \$\endgroup\$ May 20 '17 at 9:16
6
\$\begingroup\$

R, 3 2 bytes

-T

Outputs:

-1

Old 3 byte answers:

Many examples, such as:

1/0
F/F
3^6

Outputs respectively:

Inf
NaN
729

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ hah, -T! clever! \$\endgroup\$
    – Giuseppe
    Aug 14 '18 at 17:28
5
\$\begingroup\$

JavaScript (ES6), 17 11 bytes

f=_=>"g="+f

Try it

f=_=>"g="+f
console.log("Function source: f="+f)
console.log("Function length: "+(""+f).length+" + 2 (for variable assignment) = "+((""+f).length+2))
console.log("Function output: "+f())
console.log("Output length: "+f().length)
console.log("Output type: "+typeof f())

\$\endgroup\$
0
5
\$\begingroup\$

Python 2, 10 bytes

Try it online

print 9**9

Outputs 10 bytes:

387420489
*newline*

There are other 10-byte answers with decimals and power. I like this one for e in the output:

print.3**8

Output:

6.561e-05
*newline*

Same 10 bytes, but for division (there are 5 versions):

.1/64 = 0.0015625
.3/64 = 0.0046875
.5/64 = 0.0078125
.7/64 = 0.0109375
.9/64 = 0.0140625


print.1/64

outputs:

0.0015625
*newline*
\$\endgroup\$
2
5
\$\begingroup\$

Python 3, 53 bytes

s='s=%r;print("0"*~-len(s%%s))';print("0"*~-len(s%s))

Try it online!

This must be the most quine-like answer ever.

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Why not print(1e6)? \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 19:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @CalculatorFeline that would be un-quine-like. \$\endgroup\$
    – Leaky Nun
    May 18 '17 at 3:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Your answer should not be a quine. \$\endgroup\$ May 18 '17 at 9:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Notts90 this isn't a quine. \$\endgroup\$
    – Leaky Nun
    May 18 '17 at 9:13
5
\$\begingroup\$

Fourier, 1 byte

o

Try it FourIDE!

Note, TIO.run outputs a trailing newline

Outputs the value of the accumulator, 0.

More interesting programs:

2P15o

Try it on FourIDE!

Outputs 215, 32768.


4^do

Try it on FourIDE!

Outputs the current year (doesn't work if used before 1000 AD).


999**999o

Try it on FourIDE!

Outputs 997002999. The ** is undefined behaviour in Fourier. The way I think it works is A**B = A*A*B.

\$\endgroup\$
0
5
\$\begingroup\$

Alice, 5 bytes

g/@O

Try it online!

Prints:

103
g

Explanation

This was quite fun to figure out. :)

g   Pop two implicit zeros from the stack and retrieve the code point at that
    location in the code. That's the 'g' itself, so we're pushing 103.
/   Reflect to SE. Switch to Ordinal. The IP bounces diagonally up and down
    through the code.
O   Implicitly convert the 103 to "103" and print it with a trailing linefeed.
    Bounce off the top right corner and move back.
/   Reflect to W/ Switch to Cardinal.
g   Push 103 again.
    The IP wraps back to the last column
O   Interpret the 103 as a code point and print the corresponding character.
    This prints 'g'.   
@   Terminate the program.
\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

Underload, 6 bytes

()aaaS

Try it online!

Prints ((())).

() pushes an empty string to the stack. a "stringifies" it by wrapping it in (...) so after aaa we get (((()))). S prints that string (without the outermost parentheses, so we get only three pairs).

\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

APL, 2 bytes

-1

Prints ¯1 (the - is the Minus monad, whereas ¯ is the High minus negative indicator).

\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

Perl 5, 9 bytes

print$"x9

Prints 9 spaces, no newline.

Explanation

$" contains a " " by default. x9 uses the repetition operator to "multiply" the string by 9.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to PPCG! \$\endgroup\$ May 18 '17 at 13:24
5
\$\begingroup\$

Powershell, 38 bytes

Just for fun, an answer that returns different output each time it's called.

[System.Guid]::NewGuid().ToString("B")

Prints a GUID surrounded with braces ("B"), such as:

{24cc14a3-ada4-4fcd-8a08-ec419b00f22d}
\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

C (modern Linux), 19 bytes

main(){raise(11);}

Output (with newline):

Segmentation fault 

How it works:

SIGSEGV is defined as 11 in /usr/include/asm-generic/signal.h. Therefore, raise(11) raises SIGSEGV, and when SIGSEGV is raised on Linux, all execution stops and Segmentation fault is printed.

20 bytes

main(){raise(2*2);}

Output (with newline):

Illegal instruction 

22 bytes

main(){raise(2*3-1);}

Output (with newline):

Trace/breakpoint trap

22 bytes

main(){raise(5*2+5);} 

Output (with newline):

User defined signal 1 

22 bytes

main(){raise(1?26:0);}

Output (with newline):

Virtual timer expired 

24 bytes

main(){raise(12*(1+1));}

Output (with newline):

CPU time limit exceeded 

25 bytes

main(){raise(5*5?5*5:0);}

Output (with newline):

File size limit exceeded 

25 bytes

main(){printf(raise(8));}

Output (with newline):

Floating point exception 
\$\endgroup\$
10
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ isn't that first one 18 bytes? \$\endgroup\$ May 23 '17 at 4:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @DestructibleLemon Nope. There's a newline at the end. \$\endgroup\$
    – MD XF
    May 23 '17 at 4:29
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ why isn't the second one 20 bytes then? \$\endgroup\$ May 23 '17 at 4:53
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ To be pedantic, all of these messages are written by the shell that launched your program, not by your program itself. \$\endgroup\$ May 25 '17 at 8:16
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @MDXF It really is the shell, not the kernel. You can prove it by running echo 'main(){raise(11);}' | gcc -xc -; echo ./a.out | strace bash, which shows bash making the write call. The exact format varies from shell to shell. Here is where the message is defined within the bash source code. You will not find it anywhere in the Linux kernel outside of documentation. \$\endgroup\$ May 25 '17 at 20:54
5
\$\begingroup\$

Pyramid Scheme, 32 bytes

^ ^ 
-^-
^-^
-^-
^-^
-^-
^-^
- -

Try it online!

Explanation

This may not look like pyramid scheme but it is. Each triangle looks like:

 ^
 -

This performs one of three operations

  • If it has 2 args it pairs them together

  • If it has 1 arg it returns it

  • If it has 0 args it returns 0

So at the bottom we have two zeros, those are linked on the next level. On the next level two different pyramids grab the pair and then those pairs are paired together. This continues all the way up the pyramid. When we get to the top we have:

 ((((0,0),(0,0)),((0,0),(0,0))),(((0,0),(0,0)),((0,0),(0,0))))

Pyramid scheme's implicit output converts this to 16 zeros separated by newlines. That's 32 bytes.

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

Java, 82 bytes

interface M{static void main(String[]a){for(int i=0;i++<82;)System.out.print(1);}}

Output:

1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111

Try it online!

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Why not a lambda? I admit that it is boring, but I think it could be included to showcase Java 8. \$\endgroup\$
    – Yytsi
    May 17 '17 at 12:10
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @TuukkaX I made one! \$\endgroup\$ May 19 '17 at 7:30
4
\$\begingroup\$

dc, 2 bytes

Kp

Try it online!

Pushes the current precision on the stack (which is 0) and prints it with a trailing newline.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ dc prints a trailing newline after any command. The command 'c' has no other output, so it works and is one byte shorter \$\endgroup\$
    – Jared K
    Mar 30 '18 at 19:22
4
\$\begingroup\$

Bash, 1 byte:

#

It sort of outputs a newline...although I don't know if the program gets credit for that or the Bash interpreter.

I'm a bit dubious that this counts, so:

Bash, 21 bytes

x=12345;echo $x$x$x$x

This is really terrible, I know. Are you allowed to call any standard program with Bash?

\$\endgroup\$
8
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ codegolf.meta.stackexchange.com/a/7833/56341 languages are denfined by their implementation rather than by their declaration. so your 1 byte solution is perfectly valid \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 11:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok. I'm still not sure. Calling almost anything from a bash shell will generate a new line, it's not even the interpreter that's looking at my program that does that (I think). It's just that after doing whatever my program does (which is nothing), the Bash shell (which is essentially a REPL) outputs a blank line. \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 11:59
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ It doesn't output anything. What version of Bash are you using? \$\endgroup\$
    – eush77
    May 17 '17 at 12:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Heh, see my comment, right? \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 13:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ x=12345;echo $x$x$x$x only outputs 20 characters for a 21 character input. Try x=1234567;echo $x$x$x also 21 characters, 21 characters output (123456712345671234567) - oh wait, do we count the implicit \n? does that count as a feature of the program or the shell displaying output? \$\endgroup\$
    – Baldrickk
    May 17 '17 at 13:21
4
\$\begingroup\$

GNU Make, 24 21 bytes

$(sort $(value $(0)))

returns

$(0))) $(sort $(value

Complete makefile:

X=$(sort $(value $(0)))
$(info $(call X))
\$\endgroup\$
3
  • \$\begingroup\$ How do you invoke this? For me if I put this in a Makefile and run make, I get make: *** No targets. Stop. \$\endgroup\$ May 17 '17 at 15:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ @DigitalTrauma It's a user-defined function. I added the boilerplate to the post. \$\endgroup\$
    – eush77
    May 17 '17 at 16:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ Very impressive! +1 \$\endgroup\$
    – MD XF
    May 19 '17 at 1:38
4
\$\begingroup\$

AWK, 21 bytes

BEGIN{printf"%21s",0}

Try it online!

Simply prints:

                    0

The 0 could of course be any digit. No new line is printed, since that would add 2 bytes.

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

Pyth, 1 byte

k

It prints a new line character.

Explanation: k is just a variable initialized to '' (empty string), and by default Pyth prints the values of instructions which do nothing, followed by a new line character. In this case, it prints an empty string and then the new line character.

Test it online! (the online interpreter doesn't show the \n, you will have to install Pyth on your computer to actually see it)

\$\endgroup\$
0
4
\$\begingroup\$

Taxi, 540 bytes.

62 is waiting at Starchild Numerology.Go to Starchild Numerology:w 1 l 2 r 1 l 1 l 2 l.Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.Go to The Underground:w 1 r 2 r 1 r 2 l.[r]Switch to plan "e" if no one is waiting.Pickup a passenger going to Cyclone.Go to Cyclone:n 3 l 2 l.Pickup a passenger going to The Babelfishery.Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.Go to The Babelfishery:s 1 l 2 r 1 r.Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.Go to Post Office:n 1 l 1 r.Go to Fueler Up:n 1 r 1 l.Go to The Underground:n.Switch to plan "r".[e]

Try it online!

Ungolfed:

62 is waiting at Starchild Numerology.
Go to Starchild Numerology: west 1st left 2nd right 1st left 1st left 2nd left.
Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.
Go to The Underground: west 1st right 2nd right 1st right 2nd left.
[r]
Switch to plan "e" if no one is waiting.
Pickup a passenger going to Cyclone.
Go to Cyclone: north 3rd left 2nd left.
Pickup a passenger going to The Babelfishery.
Pickup a passenger going to The Underground.
Go to The Babelfishery: south 1st left 2nd right 1st right.
Pickup a passenger going to Post Office.
Go to Post Office: north 1st left 1st right.
Go to Fueler Up: north 1st right 1st left.
Go to The Underground: north.
Switch to plan "r".
[e]

It prints the integers 61 through 1 in descending order and with a decimal and 6 trailing zeros:

61.00000060.00000059.00000058.00000057.00000056.00000055.00000054.00000053.00000052.00000051.00000050.00000049.00000048.00000047.00000046.00000045.00000044.00000043.00000042.00000041.00000040.00000039.00000038.00000037.00000036.00000035.00000034.00000033.00000032.00000031.00000030.00000029.00000028.00000027.00000026.00000025.00000024.00000023.00000022.00000021.00000020.00000019.00000018.00000017.00000016.00000015.00000014.00000013.00000012.00000011.00000010.0000009.0000008.0000007.0000006.0000005.0000004.0000003.0000002.0000001.000000
\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

PowerShell, 2 bytes

+1

The upvote program. This give the output of 1 and a trailing newline to get 2 bytes. I am unsure if the operation is adding 1 to nothing or if it is rendering the positive integer of 1. Either way the result is the same.

\$\endgroup\$
1
2
3 4 5
9

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