9
\$\begingroup\$

Flow Free is an addictive android game where you have to connect pairs of elements together via non-overlapping snakes and fill the entire grid. For a description, see here:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bigduckgames.flow&hl=en

I have an ASP (answer set programming) solution which is only a couple rules and I don't think it's possible to phrase the same solution nearly as concisely as a SAT instance, but I'd be interested in being proven wrong.

Any language is fine, but I doubt it can be done concisely without running some sort of solver which is why I labeled it ASP/Prolog/SAT

Winner is fewest characters.

You may assume the problem is defined using the predicates:

v(V). % A vertex

a(V,W). % V and W are adjacent

c(C). % A color

s(V,C). % V is an endpoint of color C

Furthermore, the input satisfies

a(W,V) :- a(V,W) % Adjacencies are bidirectional

2{s(V,C) : v(V)}2 :- c(C). % Every color has exactly two endpoints

The solution predicate will be of the form

e(V,W,C).

Saying there's an edge between V and W of color C.

Edges must be bidirectional (of the same color). Each vertex must have edges to and from it of exactly one color. Endpoints have exactly one edge, all other vertices have exactly two edges. There are no loops, every snake must be traceable back to two endpoints.

Here's a sample input to test it on (5x5 Level 2 in the Regular Pack):

v(v11; v12; v13; v14; v15).
v(v21; v22; v23; v24; v25).
v(v31; v32; v33; v34; v35).
v(v41; v42; v43; v44; v45).
v(v51; v52; v53; v54; v55).

a(v11, v12).
a(v12, v13).
a(v13, v14).
a(v14, v15).
a(v12, v11).
a(v13, v12).
a(v14, v13).
a(v15, v14).
a(v11, v21).
a(v12, v22).
a(v13, v23).
a(v14, v24).
a(v15, v25).

a(v21, v22).
a(v22, v23).
a(v23, v24).
a(v24, v25).
a(v22, v21).
a(v23, v22).
a(v24, v23).
a(v25, v24).
a(v21, v31).
a(v22, v32).
a(v23, v33).
a(v24, v34).
a(v25, v35).
a(v21, v11).
a(v22, v12).
a(v23, v13).
a(v24, v14).
a(v25, v15).

a(v31, v32).
a(v32, v33).
a(v33, v34).
a(v34, v35).
a(v32, v31).
a(v33, v32).
a(v34, v33).
a(v35, v34).
a(v31, v41).
a(v32, v42).
a(v33, v43).
a(v34, v44).
a(v35, v45).
a(v31, v21).
a(v32, v22).
a(v33, v23).
a(v34, v24).
a(v35, v25).

a(v41, v42).
a(v42, v43).
a(v43, v44).
a(v44, v45).
a(v42, v41).
a(v43, v42).
a(v44, v43).
a(v45, v44).
a(v41, v51).
a(v42, v52).
a(v43, v53).
a(v44, v54).
a(v45, v55).
a(v41, v31).
a(v42, v32).
a(v43, v33).
a(v44, v34).
a(v45, v35).

a(v51, v52).
a(v52, v53).
a(v53, v54).
a(v54, v55).
a(v52, v51).
a(v53, v52).
a(v54, v53).
a(v55, v54).
a(v51, v41).
a(v52, v42).
a(v53, v43).
a(v54, v44).
a(v55, v45).

s(v11, yellow).
s(v45, yellow).
s(v41, blue).
s(v55, blue).
s(v51, red).
s(v43, red).
s(v42, green).
s(v33, green).

c(red; green; blue; yellow).

And to test the output

shouldbe(v33,v32,green).
shouldbe(v42,v32,green).
shouldbe(v43,v53,red).
shouldbe(v51,v52,red).
shouldbe(v55,v54,blue).
shouldbe(v41,v31,blue).
shouldbe(v45,v35,yellow).
shouldbe(v11,v12,yellow).
shouldbe(v12,v11,yellow).
shouldbe(v35,v45,yellow).
shouldbe(v31,v41,blue).
shouldbe(v54,v55,blue).
shouldbe(v52,v51,red).
shouldbe(v53,v43,red).
shouldbe(v32,v42,green).
shouldbe(v32,v33,green).
shouldbe(v53,v52,red).
shouldbe(v52,v53,red).
shouldbe(v54,v44,blue).
shouldbe(v31,v21,blue).
shouldbe(v35,v25,yellow).
shouldbe(v12,v13,yellow).
shouldbe(v13,v12,yellow).
shouldbe(v25,v35,yellow).
shouldbe(v21,v31,blue).
shouldbe(v44,v54,blue).
shouldbe(v44,v34,blue).
shouldbe(v21,v22,blue).
shouldbe(v25,v15,yellow).
shouldbe(v13,v14,yellow).
shouldbe(v14,v13,yellow).
shouldbe(v15,v25,yellow).
shouldbe(v22,v21,blue).
shouldbe(v34,v44,blue).
shouldbe(v34,v24,blue).
shouldbe(v22,v23,blue).
shouldbe(v15,v14,yellow).
shouldbe(v14,v15,yellow).
shouldbe(v23,v22,blue).
shouldbe(v24,v34,blue).
shouldbe(v24,v23,blue).
shouldbe(v23,v24,blue).

:-not e(V,W,C),shouldbe(V,W,C).
:-e(V,W,C),not shouldbe(V,W,C).

Also Level 21 5x5 should be the first puzzle with more than 1 solution (specifically, there are 9 solutions, not 40) To set up level 21, set the last few lines of the input to

s(v55, yellow).
s(v44, yellow).
s(v15, blue).
s(v45, blue).
s(v51, red).
s(v53, red).
s(v22, green).
s(v14, green).
s(v23, orange).
s(v43, orange).

c(red; green; blue; yellow; orange).
\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

ASP (clingo), 180 bytes

{e(V,W,C):a(V,W),c(C)}.r(V):-s(V,_).r(V):-r(W),e(W,V,_).o(V):-r(V),{e(V,W,_):v(W);s(V,_)}=2.:-e(V,_,C),e(V,_,D),C!=D.:-e(V,W,C),not e(W,V,C).:-v(V),not o(V).:-s(V,C),e(V,_,D),C!=D.

I am new to ASP, so I was excited to find this task, even if it is somewhat old. It was nice to see there were places for variations and an opportunity for golfing which was leading to the limits of my understanding (I hope it is still correct, it seems to be).

Here is a commented version:

% Select some edges e(V,W,C) s.t. V and W are adjacent and C is a color.
{e(V,W,C):a(V,W),c(C)}.

% Auxilary predicates:

% A vertex is reachable from an endpoint if
% it is an endpoint ...
r(V):-s(V,_).
% ... or it has an edge to it from a reachable vertex.
r(V):-r(W),e(W,V,_).

% A vertex is okay if it is reachable and either
% is an endpoint with one edge or is not an endpoint and has two edges.
% This is golfed to: the set of edges from V and endpoints V has
% cardinality 2.
o(V):-r(V),{e(V,W,_):v(W);s(V,_)}=2.

% Constraints:  We do not want ...

% edges from the same vertex with different colors:
:-e(V,_,C),e(V,_,D),C!=D.

% edges without their inverses:
:-e(V,W,C),not e(W,V,C).

% vertices that are not okay:
:-v(V),not o(V).

% edges from endpoints with the wrong color
:-s(V,C),e(V,_,D),C!=D.

% We're only interested in the e predicate:
#show e/3.

I don't know about different ASP solvers, but I used clingo, which in debian is contained in the gringo package.

If you have a problem in a file prob and my code in a file solve, call clingo 0 prob solve. For each solution, you will get the list of colored edges it uses (and all the other predicates if you use the golfed version which lacks the #show line). If you only want the number of solutions, add the option -q. If you only want to know if there is at least one solution, call without 0.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.