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Many of you may have interacted with people from Russia on the internet at some point, and a subset of you may have noticed the slightly odd method they have of expressing themselves.

e.g. удали игру нуб)))

where the ))) are added for emphasis on the previous statement, I have been working on a theory that the ratio of )'s to the rest of the string is directly proportional to the amount of implied emphasis, however I oftentimes find it difficult to compute the ratio on the fly, as I am also trying to cope with a slew of abuse, so I would like the shortest possible code to help me calculate what the resulting string should be, for a value of enthusiasm between 0 and 500%, given the original, unenthusiastic string, this will aid my research greatly as I will not have to type out bulky scripts every time I wish to test my hypothesis.

So, the challenge:

write a full program or function, which, provided two arguments, a string of unknown length, and a number, in either integer format (between 0 and 500) or in decimal format (between 0 and 5, with 2 points of accuracy) will

  • return/display the original string, suffixed with a number of )'s
  • the number will be the calculated as a ratio of the input number to the string length.
  • so if the number 200, or 2.00 was provided, 200% of the string must be suffixed as )'s
  • the number of brackets rounded to in decimal situations does not matter.
  • script is required to support Printable ASCII characters.
  • only has to support one input number format, of your choice.

Examples:

"codegolf" 125      = codegolf))))))))))
"codegolf" 75       = codegolf))))))
"noob team omg" 0.5 = noob team omg))))))
"hi!" 4.99          = hi!)))))))))))))))

Example code (PowerShell) (with decimal input):

Function Get-RussianString ([string]$InputStr,[decimal]$Ratio){
    $StrLen = $InputStr.Length
    $SuffixCount = $StrLen * $Ratio
    $Suffix = [string]::New(")",$SuffixCount)
    return $InputStr + $Suffix
}

Get-RussianString "codegolf" 0.5
codegolf))))

This is so shortest code wins!

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  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ I'm confused, do Russians really use ) for emphasis like an !? Is it some encoding issue? \$\endgroup\$ Jan 30, 2017 at 16:25
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @CaptainMan I believe it's more like smiley faces than !s, but they do type them as is, it's not super common, but it's quite iconic. \$\endgroup\$
    – colsw
    Jan 30, 2017 at 16:47
  • 32
    \$\begingroup\$ @CaptainMan No ) is reduced emoticon :). It is used very common between young people as far as I know. \$\endgroup\$
    – talex
    Jan 30, 2017 at 17:23
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ ) is not an emphasis, it is simply the smiley. As far as I know, it is harder to type : when using Russian keyboard layout, therefore they smile without eyes. \$\endgroup\$
    – Džuris
    Jan 30, 2017 at 17:28
  • 20
    \$\begingroup\$ @Juris it's as hard to write : on Russian layout (ЙЦУКЕН) as it is to type ^ on QWERTY. But indeed, the ) is a reduced version of :). It's much easier to press and hold Shift-0 than to repeatedly alternate keys. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ruslan
    Jan 30, 2017 at 18:12

37 Answers 37

1
2
1
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Clojure, 68 bytes

An anonymous function that accepts decimal input.

(fn [s n] (print (str s (reduce str (repeat (* n (count s)) ")")))))

Literally the first Lisp program I've ever written! I'm already having fun.

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2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the world of Lisp! :P In Clojure, you can use the condensed form of anonymous functions #(...), and you can get rid of the print (since function returns should be acceptable). You can change reduce to apply for the str function, and you can change ")" to \), which does the same thing. So, the final code should be: #(str %(apply str(repeat(*(count %)%2)\))))). \$\endgroup\$
    – clismique
    May 5, 2017 at 11:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, the current state of your code doesn't work, (#(...) "codegolf" 125) must add 125 percent of the length of "codegolf" instead of 125 times the length of "codegolf". So, the fixed program would be: #(str %(apply str(repeat(*(count %)%2 1/100)\)))), which is 49 bytes. \$\endgroup\$
    – clismique
    May 5, 2017 at 12:01
1
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C++14, 43 bytes

As unnamed lambda modifying its input, assuming s is similar to std::string (has .append(int,char) and assuming p to be of floating point type:

[](auto&s,auto p){s.append(s.size()*p,41);}

Usage:

#include<string>
#include<iostream>

auto f=
[](auto&s,auto p){s.append(s.size()*p,41);}
;


int main() {
 std::string s = "abcdefghijk";
 f(s,0.75);
 std::cout << s << std::endl;
}
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Haskell, 37 bytes

s!n=s++([1..div(n*length s)100]>>")")

Try it online! Usage: "codegolf" ! 125


A version that takes a decimal number: (41 bytes)

s!n=s++([1..n*toRational(length s)]>>")")

Try it online! Usage: "codegolf" ! 1.25

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1
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Jellyfish, 16 bytes

P
,$')
 *i
 #
EI

Takes input as decimal, then newline, then string. Try it online!

Explanation

Let's start from the bottom.

I

A raw string read from STDIN.

#
I

The length of the string.

*i
#
I

Multiply it by a number read from STDIN (the number is read first, since i comes before I in the source).

$')
*i
#
I

Repeat the character ) that many times, rounding down.

,$')
 *i
 #
EI

Append to the original string (the , looks for arguments from the south and east, and E tells the southward seeker to turn east, where it finds the I).

P
,$')
 *i
 #
EI

Print the resulting string.

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1
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Mathematica, 24 bytes

#<>Table[")",#2Tr[1^#]]&

Unnamed function taking a list of characters and a decimal number as input and returning a string. Tr[1^#] is a sneaky golfy way to calculate the length of a list, so #2Tr[1^#] computes the required number of parentheses. Table[")",...] produces a list of that many right parentheses (all decimals automatically rounded down, which is nice). Finally, #<> concatenates the input string to the parentheses, flattening the list produced by Table as it goes.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ That's quite cheaty, taking the string as a list of characters, but returning as a multi-character string. For consistent IO formats you could replace <> with ~Join~ at a cost of 4 bytes \$\endgroup\$
    – LLlAMnYP
    Feb 1, 2017 at 12:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'd be interested in a community judgment on this issue. If it's cheating, then of course I'll avoid this type of mismatch. But if it's just cheaty - well, it seems to me that cheaty is very much on topic for this site :) \$\endgroup\$ Feb 1, 2017 at 17:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ The challenge specification is sufficiently vague: return/display the original string, suffixed with a number of )'s (though I'd be picky with original string). Many other challenges specifically state "I/O formats must be consistent". If it's not a default rule, I guess you're in the white-enough part of the gray area. \$\endgroup\$
    – LLlAMnYP
    Feb 2, 2017 at 7:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ @LLlAMnYP community consensus applies for I/O methods, so I believe this is valid Mathematica \$\endgroup\$
    – colsw
    Feb 2, 2017 at 13:39
1
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Japt, 8 bytes

+')pUÊ*V

Try it

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1
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Thunno 2, 6 bytes

l×')×+

Try it online!

Takes the string, then the decimal.

Explanation

l×')×+  '# Implicit input
l        # Length of string input
 ×       # Multiply by the number
  ')×   '# Multiply by ")"
         # (implicit floor)
     +   # Append to the input
         # Implicit output
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