52
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Challenge:

In the programming language of your choice, take no input and output your programming language's name.

Fair enough, right?

Restrictions:

  • You can't use any character that is included in your programming language's name in your code. E.g., if I use Batch, I must not use the chars 'B' 'a' t' 'c' 'h' in my code. Note that this is case sensitive. I can still use the char 'b' because it's different from 'B'.
  • You can have "junk output" before or after the name of the language
  • Version number doesn't count as part of the name of the language. E.g., I can use the number 3 in the code in my answer if it's in Python 3
  • The output of the programming language name is not case sensitive.
  • Brute-forcing all possible letter combinations and hoping you get your language name is forbidden.

Example outputs: (let's say my programming language is called Language) (✔ if valid, else ✖)

  • Language
  • Body language is a type of non-verbal communication in which physical behavior, as opposed to words, is used to express or convey information. Such behavior includes facial expressions, body posture, gestures, eye movement, touch and the use of space.
  • Language 2.0 - © 1078 AD some company
  • foobar

This is thus shortest code wins.

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15
  • 8
    \$\begingroup\$ The rule about case sensitive restrictions is very ambiguous. Which is the correct orthography: BASIC Basic or basic? I'm pretty sure I can find examples for all three. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 24, 2017 at 23:47
  • 9
    \$\begingroup\$ Obligatory "Just having your code be blank but have a flag like --version isn't allowed"? \$\endgroup\$
    – Value Ink
    Jan 25, 2017 at 0:00
  • 102
    \$\begingroup\$ Have case-insensitive output while banning the language name case-sensitively allows boring solutions that just output the language name case-swapped. \$\endgroup\$
    – xnor
    Jan 25, 2017 at 0:47
  • 19
    \$\begingroup\$ You made a mistake by allowing users to output junk data. All they have to do is use a language where the compiler include the name whenever there's an error. It's cool but not the challenge I was hoping for \$\endgroup\$
    – Lynob
    Jan 26, 2017 at 8:23
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ This question really needs to be specified that "Code" must be run. Most languages will show their name in the usage dump if you don't give any code--for instance "Java" or "Groovy" at the command line with no code will display the correct name, however if you pass code (even "empty" code) as in (groovy -e "") you will get an empty response. Same for compile problems, the compiler usage or error output does not mean you wrote a program. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bill K
    Jan 26, 2017 at 18:30

156 Answers 156

1
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Keg, -v 0 bytes

Prints:

Keg Last Updated On: Wednesday 15 January 2020

Well, at least using commit 8b6ad216c1fc60e59bd143ba2ee0571df29db2f6 it does. The date part changes between commits. Why? Because -v prints out the current interpreter version.

A 3 byte answer:

ǨƐƓ

Try it online!

Prints:

keg

A 6 byte answer:

L;f;h;

Try it online!

Prints:

Keg

The 3 byter uses the push'n'print part of Keg, and the 6 byter pushes each letter and decrements it to get the correct letter.

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1
  • \$\begingroup\$ of course the obligatory -version comment \$\endgroup\$
    – PkmnQ
    Mar 8, 2020 at 6:49
1
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Rust, 0 bytes (compile time) / 18 bytes (run time)

Compile time, 0 bytes

Complier output:

error[E0601]: `main` function not found in crate `empty`
  |
  = note: consider adding a `main` function to `empty.rs`

error: aborting due to previous error

For more information about this error, try `rustc --explain E0601`.

Run time, 18 bytes

fn main(){todo!()}

Output:

thread 'main' panicked at 'not yet implemented', panic.rs:1:11
note: run with `RUST_BACKTRACE=1` environment variable to display a backtrace

Unfortunately, panicking via array indices

fn main(){[][1]}

doesn't work, because rustc catches the error at compile time.

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1
+50
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Forth (gforth), 1 byte

]

Try it online!

] switches to compile state, causing following words to be executed with their compilation semantics... and apparently, if the program never returns to interpret state, also causing it to output

Gforth 0.7.3, Copyright (C) 1995-2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Gforth comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `license'
Type `bye' to exit

I thought maybe there was some chance I could get around having to create a definition to use loops for another challenge, but this works too.

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1
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<>^v, 14 bytes

60\62\94\118\`

Pushes to stack the character's index in ASCII, then prints them, and prints a newline.

run online

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1
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Java (JDK), 0 bytes

Ties OrangeDog's Java answer, nigel222's Python answer, Cees Timmerman's C answer, Loovjo's Vim answer, Noodle9's Vim answer, James Holderness's Befunge answer, Alex Howansky's PHP answer, Flambino's huh? answer, NoOneIsHere's Quetzalcoatl answer, Matthew Roh's C answer, G B's Erlang answer, cp.fe.cp's TeX answer, BlackCap's UPL answer, Rajan Kumar's Go answer, lyxal's Keg answer, user92069's 05AB1E answer, madlaina's Rust answer, and tail spark rabbit ear's Pxem answer for #1.

Try it online!

Output (stderr)

Error: could not find or load class Main
Caused by: java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: Main

Python 3, 0 bytes

Takes a command-line option not in this list:

-B
-b
-c
-d
-E
-I
-i
-O
-q
-S
-s
-u
-W
-X
-x
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1
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Vyxal h, 0 bytes


Try it Online!

-3 thanks to Lyxal

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0
1
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Pyth, 5 Bytes

"pYTH

Simple prints the string pYTH to stdout.

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1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ This is 5 bytes, " p Y T H \$\endgroup\$ Nov 13, 2020 at 3:46
1
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,,, - 6 5 bytes

44c3×

As short as ","3× and ",,,"!

Explanation

44c3×

44         push 44                        [44]
  c        convert 44 to ASCII character  [',']
   3×      repeat ',' 3 times             [',,,']
           implicit output                []
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1
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Python 2 (15 Bytes)

exec"\x68elp()"

Python 3 (17 Bytes)

exec('\x68elp()')
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0
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Pascal, 47 bytes

BEGIN WRITE(UpCASE('p'),LOWERCASE('ASCAL'))END.

Output:

$ ./g
Pascal$

Alternative boring way, 25 bytes:

BEGIN WRITE('pASCAL')END.

Output:

$ ./g
pASCAL$
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1
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can't use P, A, S, C, A or L in your source code. \$\endgroup\$
    – Clearer
    Feb 14, 2017 at 1:49
0
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Python, 0 bytes (cheating?)

$ python
Python 2.7.13 (default, Jan 13 2017, 10:15:16) 
[GCC 6.3.1 20161221 (Red Hat 6.3.1-1)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

python is a shell command not a language command. It could equally be xyzzy if I have previously done

$ ln -s $( which python) xyzzy

Or just x (one byte, if you insist on counting the shell command as well).

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4
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I think you have to mark this as "Python (REPL)", because we've decided that a REPL is a different language from the language itself. Apart from that, though, I don't see why it wouldn't work; "REPL" is not part of the language's name. \$\endgroup\$
    – user62131
    Jan 25, 2017 at 13:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ You're not allowed to use the characters contained in the language's name. \$\endgroup\$
    – mbomb007
    Jan 25, 2017 at 14:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ x or xyzzy don't use characters contained in the languages name. I thought a little explanation was in order. Maybe cheating though, in that the python interpreter prints its own name by default. \$\endgroup\$
    – nigel222
    Jan 25, 2017 at 15:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is what I considered to submit, but decided for something else. IMHO this is valid, because invoking the programming language itself does not mean you are using the name as part of the code - (almost) any other answer needs to call the interpreter or compiler anyway if you want to actually run the program! \$\endgroup\$ Jan 25, 2017 at 16:01
0
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Scala. 11 bytes

1##

Run with scala -feature /path/to/file.scala (+8 bytes for -feature).

Outputs:

/path/to/file.scala:1: warning: a pure expression does nothing in statement position; multiline expressions may require enclosing parentheses
1##
 ^
/path/to/file.scala:1: warning: postfix operator ## should be enabled
by making the implicit value scala.language.postfixOps visible.
This can be achieved by adding the import clause 'import scala.language.postfixOps'
or by setting the compiler option -language:postfixOps.
See the Scaladoc for value scala.language.postfixOps for a discussion
why the feature should be explicitly enabled.
1##
 ^
two warnings found
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0
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Del|m|t, 25 bytes

TIO

= : Abiyjyq / 2 > ? # * !

No command line arguments, so the starting delimiter is .

Explanation:
Format: (token) command effect

(=) 29        jump command - no-op the first time through, skips 1 command the other times
(:) 26        Pushes the following String backwards. Only happens once
(A...) 25     "Del|m|t" shifted down by 3. Also the "print char" command
(/) 15        Duplicates top value
(2) 18        Nots the top, used in order to check if we printed everything
(> ?) 30, 31  If we did, end the program
(# *) 3, 10   Add 3 to the value, setting each character back to the desired "Del|m|t"
(!) 1         Pushes 1, which makes the first command skip the pushing of the string.
              This then causes the string "Abiyjyq" to print the top value when we repeat.

The trick here is using the String Abiyjyq to both encode the string Del|m|t, and print the top of the stack as a character. Thankfully, no character in Del|m|t is also in Abiyjyq, because the is in the language name are replaced with |s

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0
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Brainelly, 36 bytes

ƑA$ƒṃƁẸḷ-ṚżƁẸH/ƑKƁƊṄ$Ƒ9$⁾ṃmṚỤ$Ƒ7EṢṘ{

Original Brainfuck code:

++++[++++>---<]>-.---[----->+<]>-.+++[->+++<]>++.++++++++.+++++.---------.+++++++..-[--->+<]>.

With a no-op inserted to avoid the character restriction:

++++[++++>---<]>-.---[----->+<]>-.+++[->++++-<]>++.++++++++.+++++.---------.+++++++..-[--->+<]>.

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0
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Stacked, 30 + 1 = 31 bytes

+1 for p extension. Call like:

node stacked.js -pe "(115:1+97:2+107:6-:1-)#:''join"

(where e is the execute flag.) The p prints the top of the stack at program end. The output is 'stacked'.

Explanation

(115:1+97:2+107:6-:1-)#:''join
(                    )           array containing these
 115                             [115, 
    :1+                                115+1,
       97                                     97,
         :2+                                      97+2,
            107                                         107,
               :6-                                           107-6,
                  :1-                                               107-6+1]
                      #:         cast each number to a character
                        ''join   join by empty strings

Example usage

λ node stacked.js -pe "(115:1+97:2+107:6-:1-)#:''join"
'stacked'
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0
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8th, 4 bytes

.ver

Output is as follows:

8th 16.14 WIN64 Free (6362ab32) custid: ########

I blanked my custid with ########

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0
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JavaScript (REPL), 42 bytes

'\x6a\x61\x76\x61\x73\x63\x72\x69\x70\x74'
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0
0
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Pyth 8 bytes

r"pYTH"2

Try it online

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0
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JAVA, 21 byte

throw new Exception();

print

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Exception

Full program :

public class OutputProgrammingLanguageName {

  public static void main(String[] args)throws Exception {
    throw new Exception();
  }
}
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3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ This isn't a complete program or function. \$\endgroup\$
    – Pavel
    Jan 27, 2017 at 18:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also the complete program contains a and v \$\endgroup\$
    – Metoniem
    Feb 21, 2017 at 10:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Metoniem then that would means it's impossible in java since you always have main \$\endgroup\$
    – Walfrat
    Feb 21, 2017 at 11:40
0
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dc, 6 bytes

Eo194p

Outputs DC. Alternatively, so does this:

Fo207p

The only bases in which dc can output the letter D as part of a number are 14, 15 and 16, but I don't know if it's possible to express 16 using a single byte.

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0
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C (gcc), 0 bytes

<Yep, you read it right, 0 bytes.>

According to TIO, it outputs:

usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/6.3.1/../../../../lib64/crt1.o: In function `_start':
(.text+0x20): undefined reference to `main'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status
/srv/wrappers/c-gcc: line 5: ./.bin.tio: No such file or directory
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1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Good use of gcc arguing when theres absolutely nothing. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 5, 2017 at 14:45
0
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REXX, 21 bytes

parse version a
say a

Will give something like

REXX-Regina_3.9.1(MT) 5.00 5 Apr 2015

or

ARexx V1.15 68070 68881 PAL 50HZ
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0
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Erlang, 0 bytes

As many other languages, starting the interactive interpreter shows the language name and version.

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0
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TeX and variants (0 bytes)

Inputting an empty file or just running tex on the command line leads to an output on the console screen starting with

This is TeX, Version 3.14159265

This also works for pdfTeX, LuaTeX and XeTeX, but not for the LaTeX-variants (the "La" doesn't get printed).

Since this is TeX, I would like to also be able to produce a DVI or PDF with the TeX logo in it, but I have not yet been able to find a way around the restrictions. Simply \TeX\bye for plain TeX does work, but contains all letters in the name at least once. The LaTeX variant is even worse with \documentclass{book}\begin{document}\LaTeX\end{document}, which contains the e 6 times. For both, commands containing an e are obligatory to have a valid document. Maybe there's a way around this with some smart redefinitions, but since many macros in TeX contain the letter e I doubt it will be easy.

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1
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can use TeX's ^^ replacing mechanism to insert characters without explicitly typing them (see full explanation here). This leads to \^^54^^%^^58\^^%nd as the shortest full TeX document solution, IMO. \$\endgroup\$
    – siracusa
    Mar 27, 2018 at 10:16
0
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Julia 0.6.0 (13 bytes)

versioninfo()

Pretty boring answer, but Julia had to be represented! ;)

of course just opening Julia tells you the name... But I don't know if that's a valid answer

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1
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ i is a part of Julia. you can't use it in your answer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Uriel
    Jul 27, 2017 at 19:14
0
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Bean, 8 bytes

xxd-style hexdump

00000000: 2381 00e2 e5e1 ee20                      #..âåáî 

Try it online!

Equivalent JavaScript

"bean "

Strings (and non-standard identifiers) in bean are encoded by using the high bit to determine whether to continue reading the packed bytes as part of the string, since the only supported strings in bean are ASCII and the high bit would otherwise be unused.

Since the last character in the packed bytes for a string does not have the high bit set, it must not be one of the characters in the language name because it is equivalent to the last character in the correlating string in the source and characters from the language name are restricted from the source.

Therefore, the last 5 characters in the ISO/IEC_8859-1 encoded bean source are âåáî followed by a space. You can confirm that these characters correlate to bean by checking this script:

let string = Array.from("âåáî").map(character => {
  const code = character.charCodeAt(0)
  return String.fromCharCode(code & 0x7F)
}).join("")

console.log(string)

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0
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33, 1 byte

~

Any character not recognised by the interpreter will print the message 33 (<location>): Unrecognised token. In this case, the location would be 1:1.

Non-stderr version, 3 bytes

btp

The mutable list is initially filled in with argv, with the first element of that normalised to be "33". This takes 33 from the list, puts it in the source string, then prints it.

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0
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Rockstar, 8 bytes

Probably the only time Rockstar will ever come close to being competitive!

rOCKSTAR

Try it here (Code will need to be pasted in)

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0
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CSASM v2.1.2.3, 108 19 bytes

func main:
abs
ret
end

The abs instruction throws the following error if no values were on the stack:

StackException thrown in compiled code:
   Stack underflow detected. Cannot pop more objects from the stack.
   at CSASM.Core.CSASMStack.Pop()
   at CSASM.Core.Ops.func_abs()

Any of the 3-character instructions that pop a value from the stack would also work for this answer.

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0
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Branch, 21 bytes

66.114.97.110.99.104.

Try it on the online Branch interpreter!

Not the most exciting answer. An answer with no numbers though:

Branch, 74 bytes

/^\^'/;c;^+/;c;^'/;c;^*N/;^*}}./;c;^+/;cn^-{{.O/;cn^-{./o{{{{.^}}./{{{{{{.

Try it on the online Branch interpreter!

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