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Challenge:

In the programming language of your choice, take no input and output your programming language's name.

Fair enough, right?

Restrictions:

  • You can't use any character that is included in your programming language's name in your code. E.g., if I use Batch, I must not use the chars 'B' 'a' t' 'c' 'h' in my code. Note that this is case sensitive. I can still use the char 'b' because it's different from 'B'.
  • You can have "junk output" before or after the name of the language
  • Version number doesn't count as part of the name of the language. E.g., I can use the number 3 in the code in my answer if it's in Python 3
  • The output of the programming language name is not case sensitive.
  • Brute-forcing all possible letter combinations and hoping you get your language name is forbidden.

Example outputs: (let's say my programming language is called Language) (✔ if valid, else ✖)

  • Language
  • Body language is a type of non-verbal communication in which physical behavior, as opposed to words, is used to express or convey information. Such behavior includes facial expressions, body posture, gestures, eye movement, touch and the use of space.
  • Language 2.0 - © 1078 AD some company
  • foobar

This is thus shortest code wins.

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  • 7
    \$\begingroup\$ The rule about case sensitive restrictions is very ambiguous. Which is the correct orthography: BASIC Basic or basic? I'm pretty sure I can find examples for all three. \$\endgroup\$ – Level River St Jan 24 '17 at 23:47
  • 7
    \$\begingroup\$ Obligatory "Just having your code be blank but have a flag like --version isn't allowed"? \$\endgroup\$ – Value Ink Jan 25 '17 at 0:00
  • 88
    \$\begingroup\$ Have case-insensitive output while banning the language name case-sensitively allows boring solutions that just output the language name case-swapped. \$\endgroup\$ – xnor Jan 25 '17 at 0:47
  • 12
    \$\begingroup\$ You made a mistake by allowing users to output junk data. All they have to do is use a language where the compiler include the name whenever there's an error. It's cool but not the challenge I was hoping for \$\endgroup\$ – Lynob Jan 26 '17 at 8:23
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ This question really needs to be specified that "Code" must be run. Most languages will show their name in the usage dump if you don't give any code--for instance "Java" or "Groovy" at the command line with no code will display the correct name, however if you pass code (even "empty" code) as in (groovy -e "") you will get an empty response. Same for compile problems, the compiler usage or error output does not mean you wrote a program. \$\endgroup\$ – Bill K Jan 26 '17 at 18:30

129 Answers 129

0
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Julia 0.6.0 (13 bytes)

versioninfo()

Pretty boring answer, but Julia had to be represented! ;)

of course just opening Julia tells you the name... But I don't know if that's a valid answer

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  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ i is a part of Julia. you can't use it in your answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Uriel Jul 27 '17 at 19:14
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Bean, 8 bytes

xxd-style hexdump

00000000: 2381 00e2 e5e1 ee20                      #..âåáî 

Try it online!

Equivalent JavaScript

"bean "

Strings (and non-standard identifiers) in bean are encoded by using the high bit to determine whether to continue reading the packed bytes as part of the string, since the only supported strings in bean are ASCII and the high bit would otherwise be unused.

Since the last character in the packed bytes for a string does not have the high bit set, it must not be one of the characters in the language name because it is equivalent to the last character in the correlating string in the source and characters from the language name are restricted from the source.

Therefore, the last 5 characters in the ISO/IEC_8859-1 encoded bean source are âåáî followed by a space. You can confirm that these characters correlate to bean by checking this script:

let string = Array.from("âåáî").map(character => {
  const code = character.charCodeAt(0)
  return String.fromCharCode(code & 0x7F)
}).join("")

console.log(string)

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0
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Julia, 28 bytes

show("\x6A\x75\x6C\x69\x61")

As it turned out, the hardest part wasn't encoding the string (easy enough with escapes and an ASCII table), but finding a function in the standard library to show it. Most of them have one of the letters of ['a', 'i', 'j', 'l', 'u'] in them.

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0
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Perl 5, 1 bytes

Includes +1 for -v

Try it online!

(the body is empty). This includes both perl and Perl. But I'm going to assume the language name is perl from here on. It's what perl's own version string says the name is after all.

This is of course totally boring. Somewhat more interesting:

Perl 5, 6 bytes

say$^X

Try it online!

This assumes the name of the executable contains perl. I've yet to see an install where this is not so.

Perl 5, 11 bytes

say"\LPERL"

Try it online!

Uses the fact that case variations don't count. I couldn't use lc because it contains l. Still boring

Perl 5, 12 bytes

say FSDZ^6x4

Try it online!

This one clean but long

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0
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33, 1 byte

~

Any character not recognised by the interpreter will print the message 33 (<location>): Unrecognised token. In this case, the location would be 1:1.

Non-stderr version, 3 bytes

btp

The mutable list is initially filled in with argv, with the first element of that normalised to be "33". This takes 33 from the list, puts it in the source string, then prints it.

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0
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jq, 1 byte

a

Output:

jq: error: a/0 is not defined at <top-level>, line 1:
a
jq: 1 compile error
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0
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Turing Machine But Way Worse, 3813 bytes

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0 2 0 1 3 0 0
0 3 1 1 4 0 0
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0 223 1 1 224 1 1

Try it online!

Little surprised I didn't see this here already.

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MarioLANG, 212 bytes

+>+>+>+>+>->->-
+"+"+"+"+"-"-"-
+++++++++-----.
+++++++.+-.-.-
+++++++-+-+-+-
+++++++-+-+-+-
+++++++-+-+-+-
+++++++-+-+-+.
++++++.-+.+-++
++++++--+++-++
++++++--++..++
++++++--++--++
+!+!+!-!+!-!+!
=#=#=#=#=#=#=#

Try it online!

This answer quite simply increments and decrements the value in one cell. I'm pretty sure this is the shortest you can get without loops - I might look at an answer using loops later.

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Rail, 35 bytes

$ 'main'
 -[q]?3c(!!)2co\
  #oc1?n(!!)oc5?-&

Try it online!

Here's an expanded version:

 $ 'expanded'
 \
  --[any string]-?-3c-(!discard!)-2c-o\
                                       \
          #-o-c1-?n---(!discard!)-o-c5?--&

Rail works like a train track, with special 'stations' (functions) represented by characters that operate on values from the stack.

This pushes a string ("q" in the short one, "any string" in the long one), and then gets its type ("string"), which has an r in. It then cuts the string up to just get the r, and prints that to stdout.

It then creates an empty lambda, gets its type ("lambda"), which has an a in it, cuts the first 5 letters out, and prints the last a.

It then pushes nil (the empty list) to the stack, with n, gets its type ("nil"), gets the il and prints that.

The special character stations used are as follows:

  • [q], [any string]: push a literal string
  • ?: pop a value, push its type
  • 3: the literal value "3"
  • c: pop a, b; cut the string at the ath position and push back both halves
  • (!!): pop a value and store it in the variable with name in between the !s.
  • o: pop the stack and print its value to Standard Output
  • \, -: rails
  • &: push a lambda to the stack, and turn the train around a half turn
  • n: push nil to the stack.
  • #: terminate the program

Fun fact, in the expanded version, the second instance of the variable assignment to discard is actually assigning to dracsid, because the order you go through a station matters. The characters are read individually by the train as it goes through. This doesn't matter, because it's just being used to pop values off the stack and never use them again.

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