Post Made Community Wiki by Dennis
11 added 166 characters in body
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5 Chars:

{:x:y}

Simple for loop, for i (that's i for Implied Imaginary) in x do y. More colons can expand this into a first, second, third C-style loop.

5 Chars:

{:x:y}

Simple for loop, for i (that's i for Implied Imaginary) in x do y. More colons can expand this into a first, second, third C-style loop.

10 added 332 characters in body
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4 Chars

#0(y

Calls the first defined anonymous function in a file with y as an argument. functions are defined like $foo(args{body} but if you leave out the function name foo, it becomes anonymous, is put into a numbered list, and you must call it as above. normal functions are called with their name as expected: foo(args.

4 Chars

#0(y

Calls the first defined anonymous function in a file with y as an argument. functions are defined like $foo(args{body} but if you leave out the function name foo, it becomes anonymous, is put into a numbered list, and you must call it as above. normal functions are called with their name as expected: foo(args.

9 i'm so tired, excuse my english
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3 Chars:

1~B

Finally something unique! Take a guess as to what this does... If you guessed that it results in the second last (zero-indexed) history index of B, then you would be right!
History indicies allow direct access to a given variable's given 0 (represented by a solo tilde preceding a var) - Fh-th previous value.
What, you may ask, is the point? Well, as an example, when you use a similar statement ~1B, the result is the two (0 & 1) previous variables and B's current value concatenated based on their types. EGSHEL is dynamically typed and object-oriented thus it's up to the programmer to explicitly cast otherwise implicit types when needed. ~*B results in all previous values of B concatenated, incidentally.

3 Chars:

1~B

Finally something unique! Take a guess as to what this does... If you guessed that it results in the second last (zero-indexed) history index of B, then you would be right!
History indicies allow direct access to a given variable's given 0 (represented by a solo tilde preceding a var) - Fh-th previous value.
What, you may ask, is the point? Well, as an example, when you use a similar statement ~1B, the result is the two (0 & 1) previous variables and B's current value concatenated based on their types. EGSHEL is dynamically typed and object-oriented thus it's up to the programmer to explicitly cast otherwise implicit types when needed. ~*B results in all previous values of B concatenated, incidentally.

8 added a link. i'll update the description when i wake up~
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7 deleted 503 characters in body
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6 added 162 characters in body
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5 added 107 characters in body
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4 added 1 character in body
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3 explanation: hyphen-bars
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2 polyglottedness
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1
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