4 added 3 characters in body
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Mathematica/Ruby, 115 106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c-1).chr}#*)

Ruby works, because the two # comment out everything that's Mathematica. The reason why Mathematica works is a bit more interesting. The code I want to execute is:

If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"

But that's not valid Ruby, so I need to add a # somewhere. # is Mathematica's argumentparameter for anonymous functions. So I put # at the front, which multiplymultiplies the argument with the result of the If. Yes, it will multiply that with a string, whatever that means. Then I turn this into an anonymous function with & and call it immediately with argument 1. Well, Mathematica is clever enough to know that multiplication by 1 is always the identity and only outputs the string. Afterwards, the Ruby code is simply put in a block comment.

Mathematica/Ruby, 115 106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c-1).chr}#*)

Ruby works, because the two # comment out everything that's Mathematica. The reason why Mathematica works is a bit more interesting. The code I want to execute is:

If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"

But that's not valid Ruby, so I need to add a # somewhere. # is Mathematica's argument for anonymous functions. So I put # at the front, which multiply the argument with the result of the If. Yes, it will multiply that with a string, whatever that means. Then I turn this into an anonymous function with & and call it immediately with argument 1. Well, Mathematica is clever enough to know that multiplication by 1 is always the identity and only outputs the string. Afterwards, the Ruby code is simply put in a block comment.

Mathematica/Ruby, 115 106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c-1).chr}#*)

Ruby works, because the two # comment out everything that's Mathematica. The reason why Mathematica works is a bit more interesting. The code I want to execute is:

If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"

But that's not valid Ruby, so I need to add a # somewhere. # is Mathematica's parameter for anonymous functions. So I put # at the front, which multiplies the argument with the result of the If. Yes, it will multiply that with a string, whatever that means. Then I turn this into an anonymous function with & and call it immediately with argument 1. Well, Mathematica is clever enough to know that multiplication by 1 is always the identity and only outputs the string. Afterwards, the Ruby code is simply put in a block comment.

3 deleted 4 characters in body
source | link

Mathematica/Ruby, 115 106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c-1).chr}#*)

Ruby works, because the two # comment out everything that's Mathematica. The reason why Mathematica works is a bit more interesting. The code I want to execute is:

If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"

But that's not valid Ruby, so I need to add a # somewhere. # is Mathematica's argument for anonymous functions. So I put # at the front, which multiply the argument with the result of the If. Yes, it will multiply that with a string, whatever that means. Then I turn this into an anonymous function with & and call it immediately with argument 1. Well, Mathematica is clever enough to know that multiplication by 1 is always the identity and only outputs the string. Afterwards, the Ruby code is simply put in a block comment.

Mathematica/Ruby, 115 106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c-1).chr}#*)

Mathematica/Ruby, 115 106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c-1).chr}#*)

Ruby works, because the two # comment out everything that's Mathematica. The reason why Mathematica works is a bit more interesting. The code I want to execute is:

If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"

But that's not valid Ruby, so I need to add a # somewhere. # is Mathematica's argument for anonymous functions. So I put # at the front, which multiply the argument with the result of the If. Yes, it will multiply that with a string, whatever that means. Then I turn this into an anonymous function with & and call it immediately with argument 1. Well, Mathematica is clever enough to know that multiplication by 1 is always the identity and only outputs the string. Afterwards, the Ruby code is simply put in a block comment.

2 deleted 4 characters in body
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Mathematica/Ruby, 115 110106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c.ord-1).chr}#*)

Mathematica/Ruby, 115 110 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c.ord-1).chr}#*)

Mathematica/Ruby, 115 106 bytes

The Mathematica part was slightly inspired by Peter Olson's submission, but the polyglotting with Ruby is a bit more elaborate here.

#If[PrimeQ@Input[],"","not "]<>"prime"&@1(*
"Jg!uif!cptt!gjoet!uijt-!J!rvju/".bytes{|c|print (c-1).chr}#*)
1
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