3 added 7 characters in body
source | link

J (REPL) - 20 (16?) char

Seems we're missing a J entry. Trivially, any sentence that doesn't evaluate gets itself printed in the REPL, so 1 or + or +/ % # are all quines in that sense. A non-trivial quine would be one that produces specifically a string containing the source code.

',~@,~u:39',~@,~u:39

u:39 is the ASCII character 39, i.e. the single quote, and ',~@,~u:39' is a string. , is the append verb. The main verb ,~@,~ evaluates as follows:

x ,~@,~ y      
y ,~@, x       NB. x f~ y => y f x       "Passive"
,~ (y , x)     NB. x f@g y => f (x g y)  "At"
(y,x) , (y,x)  NB. f~ y => y f y         "Reflex"

So the result is 'string'string when x is string and y is the single quote, and thus this is a quine when x is ,~@,~u:39.

If we're allowed the J standard library as well, then we can write the 16 character

(,quote)'(,quote)'

which appends the quote of the string (,quote) to itself.

J - 20 (16?) char

Seems we're missing a J entry. Trivially, any sentence that doesn't evaluate gets itself printed in the REPL, so 1 or + or +/ % # are all quines in that sense. A non-trivial quine would be one that produces specifically a string containing the source code.

',~@,~u:39',~@,~u:39

u:39 is the ASCII character 39, i.e. the single quote, and ',~@,~u:39' is a string. , is the append verb. The main verb ,~@,~ evaluates as follows:

x ,~@,~ y      
y ,~@, x       NB. x f~ y => y f x       "Passive"
,~ (y , x)     NB. x f@g y => f (x g y)  "At"
(y,x) , (y,x)  NB. f~ y => y f y         "Reflex"

So the result is 'string'string when x is string and y is the single quote, and thus this is a quine when x is ,~@,~u:39.

If we're allowed the J standard library as well, then we can write the 16 character

(,quote)'(,quote)'

which appends the quote of the string (,quote) to itself.

J (REPL) - 20 (16?) char

Seems we're missing a J entry. Trivially, any sentence that doesn't evaluate gets itself printed in the REPL, so 1 or + or +/ % # are all quines in that sense. A non-trivial quine would be one that produces specifically a string containing the source code.

',~@,~u:39',~@,~u:39

u:39 is the ASCII character 39, i.e. the single quote, and ',~@,~u:39' is a string. , is the append verb. The main verb ,~@,~ evaluates as follows:

x ,~@,~ y      
y ,~@, x       NB. x f~ y => y f x       "Passive"
,~ (y , x)     NB. x f@g y => f (x g y)  "At"
(y,x) , (y,x)  NB. f~ y => y f y         "Reflex"

So the result is 'string'string when x is string and y is the single quote, and thus this is a quine when x is ,~@,~u:39.

If we're allowed the J standard library as well, then we can write the 16 character

(,quote)'(,quote)'

which appends the quote of the string (,quote) to itself.

2 standard library woohoo (updating for posterity)
source | link

J - 20 (16?) char

Seems we're missing a J entry. Trivially, any sentence that doesn't evaluate gets itself printed in the REPL, so 1 or + or +/ # % # are all quines in that sense. A non-trivial onequine would be a quineone that produces specifically a string containing the source code.

',~@,~u:39',~@,~u:39

u:39 is the ASCII character 39, i.e. the single quote, and ',~@,~u:39' is a string. , is the append verb. The main verb ,~@,~ evaluates as follows:

x ,~@,~ y      
y ,~@, x       NB. x f~ y => y f x       "Passive"
,~ (y , x)     NB. x f@g y => f (x g y)  "At"
(y,x) , (y,x)  NB. f~ y => y f y         "Reflex"

So the result is 'string'string when x is string and y is the single quote, and thus this is a quine when x is ,~@,~u:39.

If we're allowed the J standard library as well, then we can write the 16 character

(,quote)'(,quote)'

which appends the quote of the string (,quote) to itself.

J - 20 char

Seems we're missing a J entry. Trivially, any sentence that doesn't evaluate gets itself printed in the REPL, so 1 or + or +/ # % are all quines in that sense. A non-trivial one would be a quine that produces a string containing the source code.

',~@,~u:39',~@,~u:39

u:39 is the ASCII character 39, i.e. the single quote, and ',~@,~u:39' is a string. , is the append verb. The main verb ,~@,~ evaluates as follows:

x ,~@,~ y      
y ,~@, x       NB. x f~ y => y f x       "Passive"
,~ (y , x)     NB. x f@g y => f (x g y)  "At"
(y,x) , (y,x)  NB. f~ y => y f y         "Reflex"

So the result is 'string'string when x is string and y is the single quote, and thus this is a quine when x is ,~@,~u:39.

J - 20 (16?) char

Seems we're missing a J entry. Trivially, any sentence that doesn't evaluate gets itself printed in the REPL, so 1 or + or +/ % # are all quines in that sense. A non-trivial quine would be one that produces specifically a string containing the source code.

',~@,~u:39',~@,~u:39

u:39 is the ASCII character 39, i.e. the single quote, and ',~@,~u:39' is a string. , is the append verb. The main verb ,~@,~ evaluates as follows:

x ,~@,~ y      
y ,~@, x       NB. x f~ y => y f x       "Passive"
,~ (y , x)     NB. x f@g y => f (x g y)  "At"
(y,x) , (y,x)  NB. f~ y => y f y         "Reflex"

So the result is 'string'string when x is string and y is the single quote, and thus this is a quine when x is ,~@,~u:39.

If we're allowed the J standard library as well, then we can write the 16 character

(,quote)'(,quote)'

which appends the quote of the string (,quote) to itself.

1
source | link

J - 20 char

Seems we're missing a J entry. Trivially, any sentence that doesn't evaluate gets itself printed in the REPL, so 1 or + or +/ # % are all quines in that sense. A non-trivial one would be a quine that produces a string containing the source code.

',~@,~u:39',~@,~u:39

u:39 is the ASCII character 39, i.e. the single quote, and ',~@,~u:39' is a string. , is the append verb. The main verb ,~@,~ evaluates as follows:

x ,~@,~ y      
y ,~@, x       NB. x f~ y => y f x       "Passive"
,~ (y , x)     NB. x f@g y => f (x g y)  "At"
(y,x) , (y,x)  NB. f~ y => y f y         "Reflex"

So the result is 'string'string when x is string and y is the single quote, and thus this is a quine when x is ,~@,~u:39.