3 added 30 characters in body
source | link

AppleScript, 6868 37

Alright, if you can call ImageMagick in zsh then this too is valid. I'm still hacking at something more elegant and of-the-quine-spirit for my own satisfaction, but for pure golfiness, here we are:

New version

do shell script "screencapture q.jpg"

Old version

tell application "System Events" to keystroke "#" using command down

I imagine this will still be beaten, but verbose old AppleScript does an admirable imitation of succinctness for this one.

stop your quine

Also, this would be a more succinct approach at 34 bytes, but since it relies on calling an independent command-line application I consider it less quine-like than the above, even if technically the net effect is the same: instruct the OS that you want a screen shot.

do shell script "screencapture -c"

AppleScript, 68

tell application "System Events" to keystroke "#" using command down

I imagine this will still be beaten, but verbose old AppleScript does an admirable imitation of succinctness for this one.

stop your quine

Also, this would be a more succinct approach at 34 bytes, but since it relies on calling an independent command-line application I consider it less quine-like than the above, even if technically the net effect is the same: instruct the OS that you want a screen shot.

do shell script "screencapture -c"

AppleScript, 68 37

Alright, if you can call ImageMagick in zsh then this too is valid. I'm still hacking at something more elegant and of-the-quine-spirit for my own satisfaction, but for pure golfiness, here we are:

New version

do shell script "screencapture q.jpg"

Old version

tell application "System Events" to keystroke "#" using command down

I imagine this will still be beaten, but verbose old AppleScript does an admirable imitation of succinctness for this one.

stop your quine

do shell script "screencapture -c"
2 added 312 characters in body
source | link

AppleScript, 68

tell application "System Events" to keystroke "#" using command down

I imagine this will still be beaten, but verbose old AppleScript does an admirable imitation of succinctness for this one.

stop your quine

Also, this would be a more succinct approach at 34 bytes, but since it relies on calling an independent command-line application I consider it less quine-like than the above, even if technically the net effect is the same: instruct the OS that you want a screen shot.

do shell script "screencapture -c"

AppleScript, 68

tell application "System Events" to keystroke "#" using command down

I imagine this will still be beaten, but verbose old AppleScript does an admirable imitation of succinctness for this one.

stop your quine

AppleScript, 68

tell application "System Events" to keystroke "#" using command down

I imagine this will still be beaten, but verbose old AppleScript does an admirable imitation of succinctness for this one.

stop your quine

Also, this would be a more succinct approach at 34 bytes, but since it relies on calling an independent command-line application I consider it less quine-like than the above, even if technically the net effect is the same: instruct the OS that you want a screen shot.

do shell script "screencapture -c"
1
source | link

AppleScript, 68

tell application "System Events" to keystroke "#" using command down

I imagine this will still be beaten, but verbose old AppleScript does an admirable imitation of succinctness for this one.

stop your quine