4 Syntax coloring
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Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)
puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))
# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@
3 added 5 characters in body
source | link

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)
 

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)
 

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@
2 added 955 characters in body
source | link

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)

Ruby

It is well known what you get if you multiply six by nine. This gives one solution:

puts (6 * 9).to_s(13)

Python

A variant of Tupper's self-referential formula:

# Based loosely on http://www.pypedia.com/index.php/Tupper_self_referential_formula
k = 17 * (
    (2**17)**0 * 0b11100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**1 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**2 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**3 * 0b11111000000000000 +
    (2**17)**4 * 0b00100000000000000 +
    (2**17)**5 * 0b00000000000000000 +
    (2**17)**6 * 0b01001000000000000 +
    (2**17)**7 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**8 * 0b10011000000000000 +
    (2**17)**9 * 0b01101000000000000 +
0)
# or if you prefer, k=int('4j6h0e8x4fl0deshova5fsap4gq0glw0lc',36)

def f(x,y):
    return y // 17 // 2**(x * 17 + y % 17) % 2 > 0.5
for y in range(k + 16, k + 11, -1):
    print("".join(" @"[f(x, y)] for x in range(10)))

Output:

@  @   @@ 
@  @  @  @
@@@@@    @
   @   @@ 
   @  @@@@
1
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