5 added 414 characters in body
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Smalltalk (now seriously), 123 118 118105(*)

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars) (avoids the long mask by reusing in m):

[:a :b||s c n m|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&m:=16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&m].s]

(*) By using -1 instead of 16rFFFFFFFF, we can golf better, but the code no longer works for arbitrary precision numbers, only for machine-word sized smallIntegers (the representation for largeIntegers is not defined in the Ansi standard):

[:a :b||s c n|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&-1.s:=s&-1].s]

this brings the code size down to 105 chars.

Smalltalk (now seriously), 123 118

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars) (avoids the long mask by reusing in m):

[:a :b||s c n m|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&m:=16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&m].s]

Smalltalk (now seriously), 123 118 105(*)

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars) (avoids the long mask by reusing in m):

[:a :b||s c n m|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&m:=16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&m].s]

(*) By using -1 instead of 16rFFFFFFFF, we can golf better, but the code no longer works for arbitrary precision numbers, only for machine-word sized smallIntegers (the representation for largeIntegers is not defined in the Ansi standard):

[:a :b||s c n|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&-1.s:=s&-1].s]

this brings the code size down to 105 chars.

4 reuse constant to save 5bytes
source | link

Smalltalk (now seriously), 123123 118

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars) (avoids the long mask by reusing in m):

[:a :b||s c n|sn m|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&16rFFFFFFFF=c&m:=16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&16rFFFFFFFF]=s&m].s]

Smalltalk (now seriously), 123

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars):

[:a :b||s c n|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&16rFFFFFFFF].s]

Smalltalk (now seriously), 123 118

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars) (avoids the long mask by reusing in m):

[:a :b||s c n m|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&m:=16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&m].s]
3 added 178 characters in body
source | link

Smalltalk (now seriously), 123

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars):

[:a :b||s c n|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&16rFFFFFFFF].s]

Smalltalk (now seriously)

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s):

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

Smalltalk (now seriously), 123

Sorry for answering twice, but consider this a serious answer, while the other one was more like humor. The following is actually executed right at this very moment in all of our machines (in hardware, though). Strange that it came to no one else's mind...

By combining two half-adders, and doing all bits of the words in parallel, we get (inputs a,b; output in s) readable version:

  s := a bitXor: b.            
  c := (a & b)<<1.             

  [c ~= 0] whileTrue:[        
     cn := s & c.
     s := s bitXor: c.
     c := cn<<1.
     c := c & 16rFFFFFFFF.
     s := s & 16rFFFFFFFF.
  ].
  s           

The loop is for carry propagation. The masks ensure that signed integers are handled (without them, only unsigned numbers are possibe). They also define the word length, the above being for 32bit operation. If you prefer 68bit addition, change to 16rFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

golf version (123 chars):

[:a :b||s c n|s:=a bitXor:b.c:=(a&b)<<1.[c~=0]whileTrue:[n:=s&c.s:=s bitXor:c.c:=n<<1.c:=c&16rFFFFFFFF.s:=s&16rFFFFFFFF].s]
2 added 47 characters in body
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1
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