2 added 535 characters in body
source | link

J, 17 bytes

#=1#.1#.{.@E.&>/~

Try it online!

Note: I actually wrote this before looking at the APL answer, to approach it without bias. Turns out the approaches are almost identical, which is interesting. I guess this is the natural "array thinknig" solution

Take boxed input because the strings are of unequal length.

Create a self-function table /~ of each element paired with each element and see if there is a match at the start {.@E.. This will produce a matrix of 1-0 results.

Sum it twice 1#.1#. to get a single number representing "all ones in the matrix", and see if that number is the same as the length of the input #=. If it is, the only prefix matches are self matches, ie, we have a prefix code.

sorting solution, 18 bytes

0=1#.2{.@E.&>/\/:~

Attempt at different approach. This solution sorts and looks at adjacent pairs.

Try it online!

J, 17 bytes

#=1#.1#.{.@E.&>/~

Try it online!

Note: I actually wrote this before looking at the APL answer, to approach it without bias. Turns out the approaches are almost identical, which is interesting. I guess this is the natural "array thinknig" solution

Take boxed input because the strings are of unequal length.

Create a self-function table /~ of each element paired with each element and see if there is a match at the start {.@E.. This will produce a matrix of 1-0 results.

Sum it twice 1#.1#. to get a single number representing "all ones in the matrix", and see if that number is the same as the length of the input #=. If it is, the only prefix matches are self matches, ie, we have a prefix code.

J, 17 bytes

#=1#.1#.{.@E.&>/~

Try it online!

Note: I actually wrote this before looking at the APL answer, to approach it without bias. Turns out the approaches are almost identical, which is interesting. I guess this is the natural "array thinknig" solution

Take boxed input because the strings are of unequal length.

Create a self-function table /~ of each element paired with each element and see if there is a match at the start {.@E.. This will produce a matrix of 1-0 results.

Sum it twice 1#.1#. to get a single number representing "all ones in the matrix", and see if that number is the same as the length of the input #=. If it is, the only prefix matches are self matches, ie, we have a prefix code.

sorting solution, 18 bytes

0=1#.2{.@E.&>/\/:~

Attempt at different approach. This solution sorts and looks at adjacent pairs.

Try it online!

1
source | link

J, 17 bytes

#=1#.1#.{.@E.&>/~

Try it online!

Note: I actually wrote this before looking at the APL answer, to approach it without bias. Turns out the approaches are almost identical, which is interesting. I guess this is the natural "array thinknig" solution

Take boxed input because the strings are of unequal length.

Create a self-function table /~ of each element paired with each element and see if there is a match at the start {.@E.. This will produce a matrix of 1-0 results.

Sum it twice 1#.1#. to get a single number representing "all ones in the matrix", and see if that number is the same as the length of the input #=. If it is, the only prefix matches are self matches, ie, we have a prefix code.