5 added 6 characters in body
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Windows PowerShell, 67 64 63 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++}'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 bytes 4 bytes (thanks Cows quack) bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

PreviousOriginal Version


Windows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

Windows PowerShell, 67 64 63 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++}'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 4 (thanks Cows quack) bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Previous Version


Windows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

Windows PowerShell, 67 64 63 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++}'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 bytes 4 bytes (thanks Cows quack) by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Original Version


Windows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

4 added 110 characters in body
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Windows PowerShell, 67 6464 63 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++};'Christmas'+''Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!Try it online!

Managed to shave off 33 4 (thanks Cows quack) bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Previous Version


Windows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

Windows PowerShell, 67 64 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Previous Version


Windows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

Windows PowerShell, 67 64 63 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++}'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 4 (thanks Cows quack) bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Previous Version


Windows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

3 added 32 characters in body
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PowerShellWindows PowerShell, 67 64 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Previous Version


PowerShellWindows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

PowerShell, 67 64 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Previous Version


PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

Windows PowerShell, 67 64 bytes

for(;1225-'{0:Md}'-f(date|% *ys $i)){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Managed to shave off 3 bytes by using the -format operator instead of .ToString(), and then subtracting the date string from the numerical value 1225 instead of doing a comparison with -ne. The resulting integer will be interpreted as a boolean for the conditional where 0 (which will happen on Christmas) is interpreted as False (don't enter the loop), and any other value is interpreted as True (enter the loop).

Since the integer is on the left now, the date string will be converted to the integer and math will be done, as opposed to the previous version where the 1225 integer was converted to string for the comparison.

Previous Version


Windows PowerShell, 67 bytes

for(;(date|% *ys $i|% tost* Md)-ne1225){$i++};'Christmas'+' eve'*$i

Try it online!

Using a for loop as a while loop basically, because it's shorter. In the loop condition we check the current date (date, a shortened form of Get-Date), piped to ForEach-Object's alias %, using the form that can invoke a method by wildcarded name; in this case the method is AddDays() on the DateTime object, and the value we give it is $i.

This gets piped to ForEach-Object again to invoke the ToString() method, with format string Md (month, then day, minimal digits since we don't care for what comes next). This string is then tested to see if it's not equal -ne to the number 1225, which will be converted to a string for the comparison, saving me the quotes.

This is why it doesn't matter that the months and days are single digits, it will never be ambiguous because there's no other day of the year that would stringify to 1225.

The loop continues until the string is 1225. At the beginning of the program, $i will be zero so it will be comparing today's date, and the loop will never execute, but for any other day $i gets incremented in the loop body, so that we will have a count of how many days until the next Christmas, automatically accounting for leap years and whether or not Christmas passed this year.

After the loop we just output the string Christmas concatenated with the result of multiplying the string eve times the value of $i (which, on Christmas day, will be 0, resulting in no eves).

2 added 1117 characters in body
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