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Your task, if you wish to accept it, is to write a program that outputs a positive integer (higher than 0). If the source code is duplicated the output must remain the same. The tricky part is that if the source code is typed three times (triplicated?) the output will be multiplied by 3.

Rules

  • You must build a full program. That is, your output has to be printed to STDOUT.

  • The initial source must be at least 1 byte long.

  • Both the integers must be in base 10 (outputting them in any other base or with scientific notation is forbidden).

  • Your program must not take input (or have an unused, empty input).

  • Outputting the integers with trailing / leading spaces is allowed.

  • Leading Zeroes are allowed only if the numbers of digits is consistent eg: 001 - 001 - 003 or 004 - 004 - 012

  • You may not assume a newline between copies of your source.

  • This is , so the shortest (original) code in each language wins!

  • Default Loopholes apply.

Example

Let's say your source code is Abc and its corresponding output is 4. If I write AbcAbc instead and run it, the output must still be 4. However if I write AbcAbcAbc and run it, the output must be 12.


Shamelessly stolen Derived from Mr. Xcoder's challenge

Your task, if you wish to accept it, is to write a program that outputs a positive integer (higher than 0). If the source code is duplicated the output must remain the same. The tricky part is that if the source code is typed three times (triplicated?) the output will be multiplied by 3.

Rules

  • You must build a full program. That is, your output has to be printed to STDOUT.

  • The initial source must be at least 1 byte long.

  • Both the integers must be in base 10 (outputting them in any other base or with scientific notation is forbidden).

  • Your program must not take input (or have an unused, empty input).

  • Outputting the integers with trailing / leading spaces is allowed.

  • You may not assume a newline between copies of your source.

  • This is , so the shortest (original) code in each language wins!

  • Default Loopholes apply.

Example

Let's say your source code is Abc and its corresponding output is 4. If I write AbcAbc instead and run it, the output must still be 4. However if I write AbcAbcAbc and run it, the output must be 12.


Shamelessly stolen Derived from Mr. Xcoder's challenge

Your task, if you wish to accept it, is to write a program that outputs a positive integer (higher than 0). If the source code is duplicated the output must remain the same. The tricky part is that if the source code is typed three times (triplicated?) the output will be multiplied by 3.

Rules

  • You must build a full program. That is, your output has to be printed to STDOUT.

  • The initial source must be at least 1 byte long.

  • Both the integers must be in base 10 (outputting them in any other base or with scientific notation is forbidden).

  • Your program must not take input (or have an unused, empty input).

  • Outputting the integers with trailing / leading spaces is allowed.

  • Leading Zeroes are allowed only if the numbers of digits is consistent eg: 001 - 001 - 003 or 004 - 004 - 012

  • You may not assume a newline between copies of your source.

  • This is , so the shortest (original) code in each language wins!

  • Default Loopholes apply.

Example

Let's say your source code is Abc and its corresponding output is 4. If I write AbcAbc instead and run it, the output must still be 4. However if I write AbcAbcAbc and run it, the output must be 12.


Shamelessly stolen Derived from Mr. Xcoder's challenge

    Tweeted twitter.com/StackCodeGolf/status/973509769519685632
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Third time the charm

Your task, if you wish to accept it, is to write a program that outputs a positive integer (higher than 0). If the source code is duplicated the output must remain the same. The tricky part is that if the source code is typed three times (triplicated?) the output will be multiplied by 3.

Rules

  • You must build a full program. That is, your output has to be printed to STDOUT.

  • The initial source must be at least 1 byte long.

  • Both the integers must be in base 10 (outputting them in any other base or with scientific notation is forbidden).

  • Your program must not take input (or have an unused, empty input).

  • Outputting the integers with trailing / leading spaces is allowed.

  • You may not assume a newline between copies of your source.

  • This is , so the shortest (original) code in each language wins!

  • Default Loopholes apply.

Example

Let's say your source code is Abc and its corresponding output is 4. If I write AbcAbc instead and run it, the output must still be 4. However if I write AbcAbcAbc and run it, the output must be 12.


Shamelessly stolen Derived from Mr. Xcoder's challenge