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4 added 49 characters in body
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Powershell, 7373 55 bytes

Huge thanks to TimmyD for shaving off 18 bytes!

Code:

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)};$A

for($A=1111;$args[0]---1;$A=-join"$(+$A*$A)"[0..3]){}$A

$A=1111;1..($n=2)|%{[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)};$A

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}
$A                             #print $A

Some notes:

  • Powershell lets you assign variables in the same statements where you reference them. For example, 1..($n=4)|% will set $n to 4 and then start a loop that runs $n times. 1 can be changed to any integer and it will loop $n-[your integer]+1 times.
  • The default data type when using [math]:: in Powershell is a double. In the code above, we have to explicitly cast $B to a string so that we can call .substring() on it because there is no .substring() function for doubles in Powershell.

Powershell, 73 bytes

Code:

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)};$A

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}
$A                             #print $A

Some notes:

  • Powershell lets you assign variables in the same statements where you reference them. For example, 1..($n=4)|% will set $n to 4 and then start a loop that runs $n times. 1 can be changed to any integer and it will loop $n-[your integer]+1 times.
  • The default data type when using [math]:: in Powershell is a double. In the code above, we have to explicitly cast $B to a string so that we can call .substring() on it because there is no .substring() function for doubles in Powershell.

Powershell, 73 55 bytes

Huge thanks to TimmyD for shaving off 18 bytes!

Code:

for($A=1111;$args[0]---1;$A=-join"$(+$A*$A)"[0..3]){}$A

$A=1111;1..($n=2)|%{[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)};$A

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}
$A                             #print $A

Some notes:

  • Powershell lets you assign variables in the same statements where you reference them. For example, 1..($n=4)|% will set $n to 4 and then start a loop that runs $n times. 1 can be changed to any integer and it will loop $n-[your integer]+1 times.
  • The default data type when using [math]:: in Powershell is a double. In the code above, we have to explicitly cast $B to a string so that we can call .substring() on it because there is no .substring() function for doubles in Powershell.
3 added 528 characters in body
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Powershell, 73 bytes

Code:

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{$A;[string]$B=[math][string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)};$A

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    $A                             #print $A
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}
$A                             #print $A

Some notes:

  • Powershell lets you assign variables in the same statements where you reference them. For example, 1..($n=4)|% will set $n to 4 and then start a loop that runs $n times. 1 can be changed to any integer and it will loop $n-[your integer]+1 times.
  • The default data type when using [math]:: in Powershell is a double. In the code above, we have to explicitly cast $B to a string so that we can call .substring() on it because there is no .substring() function for doubles in Powershell.

Powershell, 73 bytes

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{$A;[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)}

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    $A                             #print $A
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}

Powershell, 73 bytes

Code:

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)};$A

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}
$A                             #print $A

Some notes:

  • Powershell lets you assign variables in the same statements where you reference them. For example, 1..($n=4)|% will set $n to 4 and then start a loop that runs $n times. 1 can be changed to any integer and it will loop $n-[your integer]+1 times.
  • The default data type when using [math]:: in Powershell is a double. In the code above, we have to explicitly cast $B to a string so that we can call .substring() on it because there is no .substring() function for doubles in Powershell.
2 added 403 characters in body
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Powershell, 73 bytes

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{$A;[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)}

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and further golfing forthcoming.exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    $A                             #print $A
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}

Powershell, 73 bytes

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{$A;[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)}

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and further golfing forthcoming.

Powershell, 73 bytes

$A=1111;1..($n=4)|%{$A;[string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2);$A=$B.substring(0,4)}

$n is n in xn-1

Explanation and exploded code:

$A=1111                            #starting number
$n=4                               #n in formula
for($i=0; $i -lt $n;$i++)          #loop n times
{
    $A                             #print $A
    [string]$B=[math]::pow($A,2)   #create a new string $B and set it to $A raised to the power of 2
    $A=$B.substring(0,4)           #set $A to the first 4 characters of $B
}
1
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